7

votes

Recovery from being "glutenized"

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 20, 2010 at 3:41 PM

Via an elimination diet, I figured out about a year ago that I am gluten-intolerant (tested negative for celiac though). After this discovery, I started by cutting out gluten for the most part (trace amounts don't give me symptoms, but I know I should stop eating it all together), and after learning about Paleo/Primal a few months later, I've been moving in that direction. I only buy and cook Paleo foods, but sometimes have a cupcake at work, or bread at a restaurant. It used to be that after eating these foods, my symptoms would start the next day, and would last for three days. Since going mostly Paleo, when I do "cheat," I am noticing that the symptoms start sooner (within a couple hours) and tend to resolve the same day; I was just curious if anyone else is having a similar experience?

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 02, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Wow, I am glad you're feeling better! My GI issues are a lot better when I'm about 80% compliant with avoiding gluten; I wonder how things will be after I've cut it out completely for awhile. I also have night waking, and I feel my energy level could be a lot better...

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on December 22, 2010
at 08:49 PM

BTW, DQ-HLA factors into other autoimmune diseases in ways that are not understood. There's little incentive to do research in this field. No money in it. We are the only ones who can or will advocate, experiment, and educate others. Taking the test changes everything. It gives you a diagnosis, a prognosis, information, and, not insignificantly, a label.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on December 22, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Clarity. It's one thing to identify gluten intolerance and another to know that your genotype includes a DQ-HLA 2 and/or DQ-HLA 8 allele on chromosome 6. The reason is that even one copy of either gene is associated with increased immune sensitivity to gliadin (gluten protein). Considering many doctors don't know much about celiac, if you want to help yourself you have to educate yourself (I saw a dozen doctors and got prescriptions for cortisone, antidepressants, valium...but no celiac diagnosis and/or useful advice). Plan on having kids? Important to know what genes you'll be passing on.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on December 22, 2010
at 04:02 AM

How will taking the test change anything??

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 21, 2010
at 01:18 PM

Maybe I'll start keeping a couple emergency Larabars in the desk for when I'm surrounded by sweets...

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 21, 2010
at 01:18 PM

Sometimes I do make baked goods with almond flour, and they've been great! My problem is mainly my office- I have a co-worker that has a cupcake business and brings stuff in somewhat regularly. Most of the time, I turn the stuff down, but some days it isn't so easy. I always feel so good about myself when I stick to my guns, so I need to keep that in mind when I get tempted with this stuff! When I slip up, I try not to beat myself up over it, but I really do need to stop messing around with the gluten :/

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:03 PM

i took the gluten intolerance test at this site. not as messy as you would imagine and from what i understand pretty accurate. https://www.enterolab.com/

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 20, 2010
at 05:26 PM

I had bloodwork and endoscopy, almost two years ago. I hadn't heard about the genetic test, I should look into that! I have an aunt and an uncle who are gluten-intolerant (also "non-celiac"). I do need to get with the program; the cupcake isn't worth it!

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4 Answers

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5
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on December 20, 2010
at 04:58 PM

I'd be interested to know more about your negative celiac result. Was it an endoscopy? If bloodwork, which test? The Mayo clinic does a genetic test. (Others do it too.) It tells you which alleles (gene variants) you have. There are two alleles that present with classic celiac symptoms. There are a handful of others that have not been well studied. I would advise you to re-test, if only so that you have more clarity on this. It was a relief for me to know with certainty that I carry one "classic" celiac allele and one "not normal but not well studied/understood" allele. The celiac/non-celiac diagnosis is far more nebulous than the medical establishment acknowledges. But make no mistake about it, you don't need two classic celiac genes to be celiac. This is not like Mendel's dwarf pea plants.

It's my understanding that the gluten response can occur after a threshhold exposure level that varies from person to person. Just because you can get away with certain amounts before reaching the threshhold does not mean that you are not reacting. Essentially, the response is not noticeable but it is happening. And then a trace amount puts you over the threshhold and...you're miserable for a day (or three...or more). I would advise you to eliminate all gluten and watch for hidden sources of gluten and cross-contamination.

When you reduce/eliminate gluten, subsequent exposures do tend to produce quicker responses. That your body is more effective at recovery on a paleo diet is a good sign that the paleo diet is working for you; but why hamper yourself by continuing to ingest a known toxin? For the gluten-sensitive individual, gluten exposure does not get an 80/20 "pass."

In my initial experiments going gluten-free, I would occasionally eat pizza or otherwise "slip up" so I won't sermonize on the cupcake issue. Suffice it to say that going bread and cupcake free, and being vigilant about contamination and hidden sources of gluten will have more tangible results than just about any other dietary change you can make, in my opinion.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on December 22, 2010
at 04:02 AM

How will taking the test change anything??

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on December 20, 2010
at 11:03 PM

i took the gluten intolerance test at this site. not as messy as you would imagine and from what i understand pretty accurate. https://www.enterolab.com/

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 20, 2010
at 05:26 PM

I had bloodwork and endoscopy, almost two years ago. I hadn't heard about the genetic test, I should look into that! I have an aunt and an uncle who are gluten-intolerant (also "non-celiac"). I do need to get with the program; the cupcake isn't worth it!

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on December 22, 2010
at 08:49 PM

BTW, DQ-HLA factors into other autoimmune diseases in ways that are not understood. There's little incentive to do research in this field. No money in it. We are the only ones who can or will advocate, experiment, and educate others. Taking the test changes everything. It gives you a diagnosis, a prognosis, information, and, not insignificantly, a label.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on December 22, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Clarity. It's one thing to identify gluten intolerance and another to know that your genotype includes a DQ-HLA 2 and/or DQ-HLA 8 allele on chromosome 6. The reason is that even one copy of either gene is associated with increased immune sensitivity to gliadin (gluten protein). Considering many doctors don't know much about celiac, if you want to help yourself you have to educate yourself (I saw a dozen doctors and got prescriptions for cortisone, antidepressants, valium...but no celiac diagnosis and/or useful advice). Plan on having kids? Important to know what genes you'll be passing on.

3
Fb17c9dcae8790443cc5fb85f47d10a7

(118)

on December 31, 2010
at 10:10 PM

From my blog:

"The other plus was discovering I was gluten intolerant. After suffering migraines for my whole life, since infancy, I was migraine free after 5 days on low carb and have never had one since. And I had the whole range of food intolerance symptoms: migraine and headaches; gastro-intestinal symptoms including stomach aches, irritable bowel, diarrhoea, urinary urgency; eczema and other itchy skin rashes; nasal congestion (stuffy or runny nose); depression, unexplained tiredness, impairment of memory and concentration,; tachycardia (fast heart beat);; irritability, restlessness, inattention, difficulty settling to sleep, night waking. All caused by gluten and modern high carb foods."

Life is so much better now! I have not had a migraine since Sept 2005, it is like being let out of prison.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 02, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Wow, I am glad you're feeling better! My GI issues are a lot better when I'm about 80% compliant with avoiding gluten; I wonder how things will be after I've cut it out completely for awhile. I also have night waking, and I feel my energy level could be a lot better...

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 21, 2010
at 04:07 AM

If it's gluten, why not cheat with an occasional gluten free cupcake? They make very tasty ones and there are gluten free bakeries as well. SOme of the paleoized baking recipies are also delicious, especially if you don't mind ingesting a bit of sugar in them. As long as it's occasional, it should be fine. I am not saying this gluten free stuff is going to be super healthy for you, but if you have a cookie made of say, almond flour, egg and sugar, it's going to be a lot better than the typical chemical loaded gluten bombs from the grocery store. Home cooked also tastes MUCH better than grocery store fodder. I don't think I really realized how bad most of the processed grocery store food tastes until I got away from it. Now, if I taste a bit of it, I am amazed at how bad it tastes and the only thing that can really tempt me is homemade product.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 21, 2010
at 01:18 PM

Sometimes I do make baked goods with almond flour, and they've been great! My problem is mainly my office- I have a co-worker that has a cupcake business and brings stuff in somewhat regularly. Most of the time, I turn the stuff down, but some days it isn't so easy. I always feel so good about myself when I stick to my guns, so I need to keep that in mind when I get tempted with this stuff! When I slip up, I try not to beat myself up over it, but I really do need to stop messing around with the gluten :/

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 21, 2010
at 01:18 PM

Maybe I'll start keeping a couple emergency Larabars in the desk for when I'm surrounded by sweets...

2
Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

on December 20, 2010
at 04:14 PM

Yes Jules the same happens to me. I am not celiac but having eliminated any gluten containing food several months ago, if I ever have one cookie or muffin (sometimes following a friends request) I can feel the difference.

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