1

votes

Japanese celiacs and soy sauce

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 25, 2013 at 3:32 PM

So I was reading a guide on Japanese soy sauces and apparently Japanese celiacs observe no ill effects from having soy sauce that was brewed with wheat in it:

"*A note about gluten intolerance and soy sauce. Much of the wheat gluten is broken down and basically consumed by the yeast during the long fermentation process. I???ve looked at the blogs of many Japanese celiacs, and they all say they don???t worry about consuming small amounts of soy sauce."

(http://justhungry.com/handbook/just-hungry-handbooks/basics-japanese-soy-sauce-all-you-need-know)

While soy is not paleo I'm not strictly paleo and allow a small amount of soy in my diet, personally I don't see a detrimental effect on my health.

So if you've cut out grains it seems alright to have a small amount of soy sauce in your food and you won't get the ill effects? These days I've stuck to tamari but it seems like the other varieties aren't harmful

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 26, 2013
at 11:49 AM

I'd wager even non-traditionally prepared soy sauce is effectively gluten-free as well. They won't bother claiming it or testing it because there's just so few wheat-free goofballs out there. I ran across some test results for some standard brand soy sauces (was in Dutch) but it was clear that they were effectively gluten-free, below the limit of detection.

33266cca338ab54cee9a2aa160f5bdb6

(502)

on July 26, 2013
at 02:48 AM

Exactly right, VB. If you can verify that your soy sauce is brewed thoroughly/traditionally/naturally then it's pretty likely that the gluten is broken down well. That being said, I like the taste of tamari better as well.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 25, 2013
at 09:37 PM

Not all brands of soy sauce are created equal. The way they used to do it before minimized gluten (almost like in Weston Price diet) but now they just add chemicals and additives without the actual fermentation, to speed up the process so... no, it is not safe. Unfortunately.

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2 Answers

1
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on July 25, 2013
at 04:17 PM

My experience has been different. I had a chicken sausage that had soy sauce listed as one of the ingredients, albeit at the end of the ingredient list. I developed a migraine after a week of eating those. Since nothing else in my diet changed I assume the migraine resulted from the gluten in the soy sauce. I guess it just depends on how sensitive you are to gluten.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 25, 2013
at 03:52 PM

Yep, soy sauce, even made with wheat, is essentially gluten-free. I have no need to avoid wheat that stringently, but I actually prefer tamari to soy sauce.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 25, 2013
at 09:37 PM

Not all brands of soy sauce are created equal. The way they used to do it before minimized gluten (almost like in Weston Price diet) but now they just add chemicals and additives without the actual fermentation, to speed up the process so... no, it is not safe. Unfortunately.

33266cca338ab54cee9a2aa160f5bdb6

(502)

on July 26, 2013
at 02:48 AM

Exactly right, VB. If you can verify that your soy sauce is brewed thoroughly/traditionally/naturally then it's pretty likely that the gluten is broken down well. That being said, I like the taste of tamari better as well.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 26, 2013
at 11:49 AM

I'd wager even non-traditionally prepared soy sauce is effectively gluten-free as well. They won't bother claiming it or testing it because there's just so few wheat-free goofballs out there. I ran across some test results for some standard brand soy sauces (was in Dutch) but it was clear that they were effectively gluten-free, below the limit of detection.

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