1

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how to pass a celiac test?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 11, 2012 at 6:35 PM

Here in my country, they are talking about giving government subsidies to those with celiac. My husband for sure has it, though when he took a test (I sadly don't remember what kind it was...) he failed. I'm also fairly certain that my oldest son has it as well, though he was never tested.
But - we don't eat gluten in the house, and they haven't had any in years. Will they need to eat gluten to pass a test?

(if so, the subsidy isn't worth it...)

Thanks for any help with this. They typically do a blood test here, I know there are a few ways to test..

I've got two other kids, and I don't think I have it, and I had no noticeable effects when I ate gluten.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 14, 2012
at 10:40 PM

Those who exhibit gluten intolerance likely are "abnormal". This says nothing about grains in general. Don't forger about all the food intolerances that exist to paleo foods; "Shellfish poisoning" would be a strange way of describing a shellfish allergy, accurate though it may be.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on June 13, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Thanks so much! I appreciate it.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on June 13, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Awesome, thanks! This is really helpful.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on June 13, 2012
at 05:59 AM

@Mscott, by "pathologising" gluten intolerance we define those who exhibit the symptoms as abnormal and hence assume that eating grains is normal, i.e. something that humans should consume. A fundamental tenant of Paleo is to eat real food and avoid items that are toxic to our physiology; grains are one of those culprits and hence should be avoided in general, not by exception. Better to call gluten a poison so that we all understand the consequences than to think of it as benign for the majority and only harmful to a minority of 'special' people that suffer from a medical condition.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 12, 2012
at 05:49 PM

Weather or not gluten is a poison (I do agree that it is in some people), poisons can still cause diseases. And celiac disease is by definition an autoimmune *disease*. It's hardly lunacy to call it a disease.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on June 12, 2012
at 11:37 AM

@Mscott, why? If this isn't a definition of poisoning I don't know what is: "Celiac disease is a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents it from absorbing parts of food that are important for staying healthy. The damage is due to a reaction to eating gluten, which is found in wheat, barley, rye, and possibly oats."

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 12, 2012
at 10:35 AM

Eddieosh, that's silly talk.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on June 12, 2012
at 02:17 AM

As an aside, I think the very idea of calling it a disease is lunacy. If you ate lead you wouldn't call your reaction "lead disease" you'd say it as it is, namely lead *poisoning*!

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 11, 2012
at 08:43 PM

@Amy B. I wasn't defending it, I was just explaining their motivation. I'm not necessarily against such regulations, if only they were fair. I'm recovering from Crohn's/ulcerative colitis (which is worse than celiac disease, I believe), following a GAPS-type diet and I cannot get any subsidies for my more expensive food, because there is no 'scientific link between diet and Crohn or ulcerative colitis'.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 11, 2012
at 07:47 PM

@Ben - I have to buy more expensive food just because I want *real* and *good* food. (Then again, I guess I don't "have to," like a celiac would. It is indeed my choice.) I don't think the U.S. gov't is ever gonna subsidize my organic kale or pastured eggs, hehheh. If only! (In fact, we're doing the opposite - we're subsidizing the foods that celiacs need to *avoid.*) I understand your point, though. I just wish governments - in whatever countries - would stay the heck out of it.

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 11, 2012
at 07:42 PM

@MathGirl72 It is based on the idea that people with celiac disease have to buy more expensive food than those without celiac disease following a 'standard diet'. The $50 is meant to compensate for that.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 11, 2012
at 07:23 PM

Government run amok. Subsidies for celiac? Really? Words escape me...

1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 11, 2012
at 06:45 PM

I don't know in which country 'shunshinestarr' lives, but I do know that such a system exits in Belgium (where I live). It's not much though (about 40 EUR = about $50 a month).

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 11, 2012
at 06:42 PM

What country is that? I want to move there! :) My blood test came back negative and I am celiac FOR SURE. I had the endoscopy done and some damage was detected. GLUTEN IS THE EVIL OF ALL EVILS.

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2 Answers

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4
35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on June 11, 2012
at 07:20 PM

I was given a blood test for the HLA DQ2/DQ8 gene, which the gene that causes celiac. It's the only test that you can take after having been off of gluten for years. All of the other available tests will produce a false negative after about a month of abstaining. I was not off of gluten at the time and did not have the gene. I wish now that I had tried other avenues of diagnosis before before quitting gluten because I believe that I would have probably ended up with the diagnosis. Of course, it's not worth the suffering of being back on gluten for two months just to find out. So at this point, your best bet is the gene test if you haven't already taken it.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on June 13, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Awesome, thanks! This is really helpful.

3
1e443a3241f80129faa05125ce346e47

(734)

on June 11, 2012
at 06:44 PM

If you haven't eaten anything with gluten for a long time, they won't be able to diagnose it. Usually, they take a blood test first and see if there are any antibodies in the blood that make it LIKELY (not sure!) that you have it. Your subsidies will not be given on likelihood alone, I believe. Then they do an endoscopy, where they'll look infection resulting from celiac disease. If you haven't eaten any gluten for a while, they won't be able to detect those.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on June 13, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Thanks so much! I appreciate it.

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