8

votes

Gluten risks for non-celiac folks

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 21, 2011 at 7:17 PM

Challenged by my nurse-practioner sister to justify the reasons why those without celiac disease should avoid gluten, I came up empty on my first few tries through google. Does anybody have a study (not a link to somebody's blog, but an actual study) that quantifies the health risks of eating gluten for those who are otherwise not at risk (i.e. Celiac)? Thanks

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 23, 2011
at 01:27 PM

Fantastic answer.

Dbb6872f139877fe1a94aeb471baa7d1

on January 22, 2011
at 11:43 PM

Yes, it definately does. I spent a year sick until I became CONVINCED I had celiac. Had the endoscopy and went gluten-free the next day. Felt so much better -- and was SHOCKED when my gastro doc said that I did NOT have celiac. ALL of my bloodwork, and the endoscopy, came back negative. I went back on wheat -- and got sick again. I discovered Primal a few months later (trying to figure it out) and never looked back...

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 22, 2011
at 03:27 AM

excellent post Stephen!

Medium avatar

(2169)

on January 22, 2011
at 02:48 AM

thanks for compiling this! Now I can give my doctor a good response next time he asks. His wife has Celiac disease but he can't understand why I'm not eating wheat.

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on January 22, 2011
at 01:54 AM

thanks for compiling these--i know what i'm reading tonight!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 21, 2011
at 11:42 PM

What reference?

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 10:34 PM

Awesome! That's great, though the reference to Tim Ferriss almost ruined it....

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:22 PM

Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8.

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:19 PM

Thanks though, what I'd like to see is a study showing the negative effects of gluten on otherwise healthy people (no celiac, no IBS, etc). IBS seems like "low hanging fruit" if you catch my drift. Anything on people with no health complaints?

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Jae - You did read the entire first line before replying didn't you?

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:02 PM

Also, I would avoid getting into these kinds of debates with your NPs and doctors. Unless you have a significant science background, you will not be able to keep up with their arguments, and they won't think much of your credibility anyway (even if you were a doctor yourself). There's very little to gain from such a thing unless your NP is exceptionally open-minded.

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6 Answers

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26
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on January 21, 2011
at 09:16 PM

Evolvify did a nice writeup on it. http://evolvify.com/the-case-against-gluten-medical-journal-references/

Theres a start for you, by no means comprehensive, but might drive just a little bit home that its not just some keyboard jockeys internet opinion.

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 10:34 PM

Awesome! That's great, though the reference to Tim Ferriss almost ruined it....

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:22 PM

Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 21, 2011
at 11:42 PM

What reference?

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 22, 2011
at 03:27 AM

excellent post Stephen!

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on January 22, 2011
at 01:54 AM

thanks for compiling these--i know what i'm reading tonight!

Medium avatar

(2169)

on January 22, 2011
at 02:48 AM

thanks for compiling this! Now I can give my doctor a good response next time he asks. His wife has Celiac disease but he can't understand why I'm not eating wheat.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 23, 2011
at 01:27 PM

Fantastic answer.

4
07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:24 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21224837

Am J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jan 11. [Epub ahead of print] Gluten Causes Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Subjects Without Celiac Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Biesiekierski JR, Newnham ED, Irving PM, Barrett JS, Haines M, Doecke JD, Shepherd SJ, Muir JG, Gibson PR.

Monash University Department of Medicine and Gastroenterology, Box Hill Hospital, Box Hill, Victoria, Australia. Abstract OBJECTIVES: Despite increased prescription of a gluten-free diet for gastrointestinal symptoms in individuals who do not have celiac disease, there is minimal evidence that suggests that gluten is a trigger. The aims of this study were to determine whether gluten ingestion can induce symptoms in non-celiac individuals and to examine the mechanism.

METHODS: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled rechallenge trial was undertaken in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in whom celiac disease was excluded and who were symptomatically controlled on a gluten-free diet. Participants received either gluten or placebo in the form of two bread slices plus one muffin per day with a gluten-free diet for up to 6 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated using a visual analog scale and markers of intestinal inflammation, injury, and immune activation were monitored.

RESULTS: A total of 34 patients (aged 29-59 years, 4 men) completed the study as per protocol. Overall, 56% had human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8. Adherence to diet and supplements was very high. Of 19 patients (68%) in the gluten group, 13 reported that symptoms were not adequately controlled compared with 6 of 15 (40%) on placebo (P=0.0001; generalized estimating equation). On a visual analog scale, patients were significantly worse with gluten within 1 week for overall symptoms (P=0.047), pain (P=0.016), bloating (P=0.031), satisfaction with stool consistency (P=0.024), and tiredness (P=0.001). Anti-gliadin antibodies were not induced. There were no significant changes in fecal lactoferrin, levels of celiac antibodies, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, or intestinal permeability. There were no differences in any end point in individuals with or without DQ2/DQ8.

CONCLUSIONS: "Non-celiac gluten intolerance" may exist, but no clues to the mechanism were elucidated.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 11 January 2011; doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.487.

PMID: 21224837 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

3
630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on January 24, 2011
at 07:47 AM

Thanks for linking my article on this, Stephen.

PubMed isn't great for doing searches unless you know exactly what you're looking for, and regular Google is cluttered with so much unhelpful pontificating on gluten that it's hard to get good answers.

Google Scholar is really the way to go for this type of research. Coincidentally I just wrote a post about how to find free scientific studies so that might help.

If you just want a shortcut, here's a pre-built search query for gluten studies in non-celiac individuals on Scholar (7,270 results).

2
77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on January 21, 2011
at 08:59 PM

Good timing. Stephan just published a blog post on it today.

Eating Wheat Causes Symptoms in Some People Who Don't Have Celiac Disease

Mael??n Fontes Villalba at Lund University recently forwarded me an interesting new paper in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Dr. Jessica R. Biesiekierski and colleagues recruited 34 IBS patients who did not have celiac disease, but who felt they had benefited from going gluten-free in their daily lives*. All patients continued on their pre-study gluten-free diet, however, half were given two slices of wheat bread and one wheat muffin per day, and the other half were given the same foods made from gluten-free ingredients.

During the six weeks of the intervention, patients receiving the gluten-free food fared considerably better on nearly every symptom of IBS measured. The most striking difference was in tiredness-- the gluten-free group was much less tired on average than the gluten group. Interestingly, they found that a negative reaction to wheat was not necessarily accompanied by the presence of anti-gluten antibodies in the blood, which is a test often used to diagnose gluten sensitivity.

A previous study in 1981 showed that feeding volunteers a large dose of gluten every day for 6 weeks caused adverse gastrointestinal effects, including inflammatory changes, in relatives of people with celiac disease, who did not themselves have celiac (3). Together, these are the most solid evidence that gluten can be damaging in people without celiac disease, a topic that has not received much interest in the biomedical research community.

FWIW, I think Stephan's blog is better than any peer-reviewed journal... but anyway, the article linked in the quote above should get you started.

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Jae - You did read the entire first line before replying didn't you?

525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:19 PM

Thanks though, what I'd like to see is a study showing the negative effects of gluten on otherwise healthy people (no celiac, no IBS, etc). IBS seems like "low hanging fruit" if you catch my drift. Anything on people with no health complaints?

Dbb6872f139877fe1a94aeb471baa7d1

on January 22, 2011
at 11:43 PM

Yes, it definately does. I spent a year sick until I became CONVINCED I had celiac. Had the endoscopy and went gluten-free the next day. Felt so much better -- and was SHOCKED when my gastro doc said that I did NOT have celiac. ALL of my bloodwork, and the endoscopy, came back negative. I went back on wheat -- and got sick again. I discovered Primal a few months later (trying to figure it out) and never looked back...

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on January 21, 2011
at 09:02 PM

Also, I would avoid getting into these kinds of debates with your NPs and doctors. Unless you have a significant science background, you will not be able to keep up with their arguments, and they won't think much of your credibility anyway (even if you were a doctor yourself). There's very little to gain from such a thing unless your NP is exceptionally open-minded.

1
E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on January 22, 2011
at 03:26 AM

Anotehr large list of scholarly journal articles here: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/search/node/gluten

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