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gluten intolerance?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 05, 2012 at 2:34 AM

I ate pasta today after a couple months wheat free. I "cheat" on paleo alot... but I usually eat oatmeal or rice when I cheat and have zero noticeable negative effects. I try not to do this often but I probably do have some gluten free grains around twice a week.

Anyway, today I decided to eat some pasta (it was free) and some vanilla wafers... I know, I know, horrible choices. I figured it wouldn't kill be this once though. A couple hours after eating it, I got some severe stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea, and a bad headache. 9 hours later I am still experiencing these symptoms. Do you guys experience these sort of symptoms when eating gluten or does this suggest a major/minor allergy to it?

B7646bb4582c3adfc977b57392c35a92

on December 06, 2012
at 12:55 AM

@thhq In my case with leaky gut and Hashimito's thyroiditis I suspect gluten is probably the primary vector for my current health issues. So staying on it to maintain proteases is not an option.

B7646bb4582c3adfc977b57392c35a92

on December 06, 2012
at 12:52 AM

@MathGirl72 Yes, because the immune response is more severe when your body detoxifies then reacts to a new gluten stimulus than when it adapts to dealing with an allergen all the time. This is, of course, assuming the individual is simply intolerant and not full-blown celiac.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 08:06 PM

It could be because you need the live bacterial culture rather than the extracted enzyme.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 08:04 PM

I've read that supplementing with enzymes works sometimes, but not in any reliable way. I read a long blog review and can't find it, but here's a starter: http://www.celiac.com/articles/22726/1/Can-Enzyme-Supplements-Really-Break-Down-Gluten/Page1.html

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:54 PM

True. But how do you repopulate your gut with the right bacteria?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:27 PM

IMHO it's a symptom of missing gut bacteria which contain the enzymes necessary to digest gluten. Similar to lactose and casein intolerance. If you avoid eating dairy or gluten, there's a likelihood that you'll lose the ability to eat them,until your gut repopulates with the necessary bacteria.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:18 PM

More n=1 evidence that by avoiding gluten the ability to process it is lost. Probably due to the loss of gluten-specific proteases.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on December 05, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Occasional eating is likely going to be more *painful*, although it *may be* less harmful over a longer period of time.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 05, 2012
at 01:46 PM

Really? Occasionally is worse than eating the poison all of the time? How is it more harmful when your body is constantly inflamed and you don't notice the response?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on December 05, 2012
at 02:56 AM

ditto .

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5 Answers

3
B7646bb4582c3adfc977b57392c35a92

on December 05, 2012
at 02:43 AM

Sounds similar to what I experience with gluten intolerance. Gluten is one of those things you should never cheat on. Either eat it or don't, occasional indulgences are, unfortunately, much more harmful than just eating it all the time.

B7646bb4582c3adfc977b57392c35a92

on December 06, 2012
at 12:52 AM

@MathGirl72 Yes, because the immune response is more severe when your body detoxifies then reacts to a new gluten stimulus than when it adapts to dealing with an allergen all the time. This is, of course, assuming the individual is simply intolerant and not full-blown celiac.

B7646bb4582c3adfc977b57392c35a92

on December 06, 2012
at 12:55 AM

@thhq In my case with leaky gut and Hashimito's thyroiditis I suspect gluten is probably the primary vector for my current health issues. So staying on it to maintain proteases is not an option.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on December 05, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Occasional eating is likely going to be more *painful*, although it *may be* less harmful over a longer period of time.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 05, 2012
at 01:46 PM

Really? Occasionally is worse than eating the poison all of the time? How is it more harmful when your body is constantly inflamed and you don't notice the response?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on December 05, 2012
at 02:56 AM

ditto .

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:18 PM

More n=1 evidence that by avoiding gluten the ability to process it is lost. Probably due to the loss of gluten-specific proteases.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 05, 2012
at 05:21 AM

Gluten in an industrially processed form is bad for you in a long run anyway, so welcome to the club! Not to scare you or anything, but gluten intolerance is a symptom. Gluten itself does not cause gluten intolerance, your body's reaction does. So what I am saying is gluten intolerance is a sign of inflammatory processes that go on in your body.

You better shape up and make sure not to eat any inflammatory foods. Then your body's inflammatory response will go down, and, chances are, your gluten intolerance as well. You will be able to occasionally tolerate traditionally made whole grains.

GAPS is all about lowering your body's inflammatory response. Paleo too, but you might want to switch to Autoimmune Paleo.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 08:04 PM

I've read that supplementing with enzymes works sometimes, but not in any reliable way. I read a long blog review and can't find it, but here's a starter: http://www.celiac.com/articles/22726/1/Can-Enzyme-Supplements-Really-Break-Down-Gluten/Page1.html

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:54 PM

True. But how do you repopulate your gut with the right bacteria?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 07:27 PM

IMHO it's a symptom of missing gut bacteria which contain the enzymes necessary to digest gluten. Similar to lactose and casein intolerance. If you avoid eating dairy or gluten, there's a likelihood that you'll lose the ability to eat them,until your gut repopulates with the necessary bacteria.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 05, 2012
at 08:06 PM

It could be because you need the live bacterial culture rather than the extracted enzyme.

1
3089dd0b9a8f1d24f1b08d6cc3ca84e3

(363)

on December 05, 2012
at 04:43 AM

Very very similar to what i feel as well , gluten can cause brain fog , chronic fatigue for days , headaches joint pains , and even depression @least in me it does . I literally cant cheat , u have to ask when your feelin horrible ask yourself is it really worth it ??? Cheating some times ranges from severe calorie restriction and also bland food make delicious Paleo foods and eat them in abundance and train . Look into Diane Sanfillipio she has a great book out , her website is www.balancedbites.com

1
Medium avatar

(1240)

on December 05, 2012
at 03:28 AM

Yes, that's very similar to how I felt when I tested wheat. It leaves me with a cramping feeling very low in my stomach that lasts for about five days.

0
9e45befcdc48990a38cd19e8ca988524

on January 23, 2013
at 12:35 PM

There's a chance it could be gluten intolerance, but I would suggest meeting with a physician to find out for sure. I've only JUST started eating gluten free (I buy my food online from Gluten Free Palace), but I have to say, it hasn't been easy and takes a LOT of getting used to. Needless to say, if I wasn't diagnosed with gluten intolerance, I wouldn't consider a gluten free diet. So before you embark on any diet, it's always advisable to consult with a doctor first.

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