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Does (slow) cooking with beer change the possible harmful effects of beer?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 17, 2010 at 5:44 PM

In Belgium, as everybody knows, we have the best beer in the world! Literally hundreds of them, all sorts and all kinds.

Now, I really don't drink much of them, almost none lately. Not that I have noted any adverse effects, but I actually prefer a glass of wine...

There is, however, one really good recipe I like to cook: a stew of beef (or rabbit) with onion, dried plum and brown beer. Really ease, really delicious.

My question: does the long and slow cooking change the possible harmful effects of the beer?

Thanks

[Maybe, in short the recipe: fry some onions in a good amount of fat (you can always add more if you like). Put in the meat and brown it on all sides. Then put on the lowest fire you have and add some aceto balsamico (not too much, I have no idea how many teaspoons), a bottle (25cl to 33cl) of beer, preferably brown. Add some salt and pepper, a laurel leaf, some thyme and the dried plums (amount of plums depends on how much carbs you want, and how many your gut can handle!). Let simmer for about 3 hours (just check the beef for tenderness). Usually, people would use some flower to bind the sauce, just skip that part. Today we had some with cauliflower-mash (cauliflower, eggs, butter).]

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 25, 2011
at 04:36 PM

this sounds so good. mmmm...wabbit!

499f188c87c6980742b9ba98caa6f563

(683)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:46 AM

Very good reference by Krish. Pieter D says above that he simmers for 3 hours, so in this recipe, definitely the alcohol is almost all gone (<5%).

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:15 AM

GI is not really a big issue in my recipe, especially since I include dried plums. They surely have a high GI. Now, generally at home, we're not scared of some carbs (tubers, fruits) now and then

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:12 AM

now, alcohol is the least of worries, but the reference Krish cites is nice. thanks

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on August 18, 2010
at 02:50 AM

yep beer has a really low GI, most sources publish under 15

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on August 18, 2010
at 02:50 AM

myth in most uses of alcohol in cooking see table at: http://www.ochef.com/165.htm

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 18, 2010
at 12:55 AM

I wish...........

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 17, 2010
at 10:15 PM

might be a silly add-on question, but would the cooking process at all ameliorate the carbohydrate load of the beer? thanks

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 17, 2010
at 06:57 PM

It's worth nothing that there is a gluten-free Belgian ale brand -- Green's. They do a dubbel and a tripel, even. It's surprisingly good.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 17, 2010
at 06:51 PM

Oh, but in Belgium, and I guess, in other European countries, rabbit is readily available (butcher, supermarket).

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4 Answers

5
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 17, 2010
at 06:22 PM

Fermentation does not eliminate gluten. Cooking won't eliminate it, either. (Distillation will.) I can't speak to what would happen to the other nasties in grain, but as someone with celiac, beer (excepting special gluten-free varieties) is off-limits, period.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 17, 2010
at 06:57 PM

It's worth nothing that there is a gluten-free Belgian ale brand -- Green's. They do a dubbel and a tripel, even. It's surprisingly good.

1
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 17, 2010
at 07:21 PM

GO for it - As a diabetic, I find beer to have little effect on my numbers ( I drink Guinness 99 % of the time) but very big Hop beers like Serra Nevada, etc I can't drink. Fermented grains is the key to why it is okay.

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on August 18, 2010
at 02:50 AM

yep beer has a really low GI, most sources publish under 15

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:15 AM

GI is not really a big issue in my recipe, especially since I include dried plums. They surely have a high GI. Now, generally at home, we're not scared of some carbs (tubers, fruits) now and then

0
499f188c87c6980742b9ba98caa6f563

(683)

on August 17, 2010
at 10:16 PM

Doesn't boiling drive off all the alcohol?

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on August 18, 2010
at 02:50 AM

myth in most uses of alcohol in cooking see table at: http://www.ochef.com/165.htm

499f188c87c6980742b9ba98caa6f563

(683)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:46 AM

Very good reference by Krish. Pieter D says above that he simmers for 3 hours, so in this recipe, definitely the alcohol is almost all gone (<5%).

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 18, 2010
at 07:12 AM

now, alcohol is the least of worries, but the reference Krish cites is nice. thanks

0
D628a7339e8567f7246fc0cf652acacf

on August 17, 2010
at 06:13 PM

I've actually been assuming that beer is not that bad in general, as it's fermented grains, and fermentation is supposed to be the way to make grain edible. But I haven't seen the "expert" paleo bloggers comment on it one way or the other.

And your recipe sounds delicious, I will have to try it. But with beef, as I have no idea where to get rabbit meat. I definitely won't be attempting to eat the cute little bunnies that live around my condo.

(Also, I agree that Belgian beer really is great.)

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on August 17, 2010
at 06:51 PM

Oh, but in Belgium, and I guess, in other European countries, rabbit is readily available (butcher, supermarket).

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