2

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Allergens and sharing cookware

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 15, 2011 at 1:46 AM

So I recently moved out with roommates, and since I cook so much, I bought a real nice set of new cookware for the house. Something just occured to me as none of my roommies are paleo. If they use my cookware to cook non-paleo foods, do I need to be worried? One maily cooks mostly gluten containing foods so this has potential to be bad.

Any thoughts?

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on January 16, 2011
at 09:25 PM

I meant 20 ppm - sorry about that! Here is a link to the FDA's proposals from 2007 about gluten-free labeling where they recommend 20 ppm. However, in my opinion, I think the threshold is even lower and I find that I can have reactions (migraines, muscle and joint pain) to certain foods labeled GF. I avoid most GF foods these days since most are just vehicles for sugar and non-GF grains.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

At least he is understanding about it, ya know.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Awesome, Thank you , Laurie. I had a talk with him, and he's going to pick up an extra set. I think I might have gotten a reaction last night post dinner. Eyes started burning, spend a fair amount of time in the restroom.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 15, 2011
at 06:41 PM

Excellent points. Do you have a reference for the 2 ppm gluten threshhold for provoking a response?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 03:04 AM

I sure am! Unfortunately for him, he has really bad allergies, and digestion issues. I have tried to plant the paleo seed, but he is not open to it. It's hard to watch.

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4 Answers

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3
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on January 15, 2011
at 02:05 AM

Don't worry. Just be sure to wash the pots and pans before using.

One thing to watch out for is any residual gluten on a wood cutting board. It also harbors bacteria from previous use. Be sure to throughly wash with hot water and soap and then weekly, wet the surface and cover the board with a liberal amount of salt to kill anything hiding in the carving groves. Let it sit overnight.

I bet you are slimmer than your gluten eating roommate!

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 03:04 AM

I sure am! Unfortunately for him, he has really bad allergies, and digestion issues. I have tried to plant the paleo seed, but he is not open to it. It's hard to watch.

2
3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

on January 15, 2011
at 05:17 PM

I, personally, would not share cookware with someone who cooks with gluten foods. Gluten is a very persistent protein and is not easily washed away and does not denature with ordinary cooking temps or with soap and water. Get him his own cheap cookware. It only takes about 2 ppm of gluten to provide a reaction if you are gluten sensitive. Why take the risk? Luckily I do all the cooking at my house so I do not cook any gluten-containing food. When my husband eats crackers, bread, etc. he is careful to clean up any crumbs and not contaminate the non-gluten food. I'm working on getting him primal/paleo as well, so his gluten days are numbered. :) When I first went gluten-free, I thought I could occasionally pick off croutons from a salad or meat off a sandwich and be OK. I soon found out how little gluten is needed to cause a reaction. The worst part is that is might be three days later so it is hard to connect the dots until you finally realize what is happening. I am three years gluten-free now!

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 15, 2011
at 06:41 PM

Excellent points. Do you have a reference for the 2 ppm gluten threshhold for provoking a response?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Awesome, Thank you , Laurie. I had a talk with him, and he's going to pick up an extra set. I think I might have gotten a reaction last night post dinner. Eyes started burning, spend a fair amount of time in the restroom.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

At least he is understanding about it, ya know.

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on January 16, 2011
at 09:25 PM

I meant 20 ppm - sorry about that! Here is a link to the FDA's proposals from 2007 about gluten-free labeling where they recommend 20 ppm. However, in my opinion, I think the threshold is even lower and I find that I can have reactions (migraines, muscle and joint pain) to certain foods labeled GF. I avoid most GF foods these days since most are just vehicles for sugar and non-GF grains.

1
Fe33d1321dad116f6fedd60266d0498b

on January 17, 2011
at 03:18 AM

I would venture that it likely depends on the cookware and the cleaning methods. I wouldn't be too inclined to share cutting boards, cast iron, enamelware, non-stick stuff (inevitably scratches), stoneware, metal pans, or anything with "nooks and crannies." (the cast iron & enamelware I'd be protective of just because they'll well outlast the roomies!) So, about the only shareable thing- glass. Whoops.

Since realistically it's unlikely that the roomie will consistently distinguish between these classes of goods (your roomie may be better than those I have/have had), I'd probably just flat-out ban them if I had, say, celiac. If I could tolerate small amounts of contamination- I'd probably still ban them but be less of a hard-nose about it (meaning- less likely to keep my cookware in my room after the first time I see them using it).

Roomies are weird; it's ok to be the weird one.

Oh! You might want to look into resources about keeping kosher- I'm thinking there may be some way out there (a superhandy non-toxic way, unlike, say, sharpie-markering things) to mark GF cookware, since those who keep kosher might have to mark their cookware in similar situations.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 17, 2011
at 02:58 AM

Over at celiac.com, there seems to be a wide range in sensitivity. most can eat the 20ppm stuff. One group, GIG, certifies products that test to 10 ppm, and the CSA certifies products that test to 5 ppm. I have heard of tests that Can detect down to 1ppm but detecting gluten peptides at 1 ppm is not the same as 1ppm gluten, apparently. This article on marmite tries to explain this. http://thepersonalitydiet.com/dietblogs/read_blog.php?title=Is+Marmite+Gluten+Free%3F&blid=18530

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