4

votes

Can gluten sensitivity be "cured"?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 24, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Last year I found out that I had a gluten intolerance/sensitivity by eliminating it for a month and then reintroducing it. It made me feel bloated within a couple hours and turned me into a stinkbomb. Then a month or two later I accidentally had gluten without knowing, felt uncomfortable/gassy, then realized something I ate had gluten in it (which cleared my suspicion of a potential "placebo" effect of being intolerant). Something along these lines happened twice.

About a week ago, after being 100% gluten free for at least 6-7 months (since the last accidental glutening) I knowingly had some gluten, but found that it didn't have that effect on me. I had maybe a tiny amount of flatulence the next day, but I couldn't tell if it was related to the gluten or not. I found this odd, because I always thought that the more I avoid gluten, the more sensitive I would get.

Now my mother, who I convinced to go gluten free shortly after I did ( though she still occasionally had some and dealt with the discomfort ) said she experienced a similar thing after a longer time without gluten.

So have we "cured" the intolerance or decreased sensitivity somehow? Any ideas why this might happen?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 25, 2013
at 06:52 PM

I did not downvote myself. Most people don't think that it can be cured, they think it is hereditary. I thought so too when I became gluten-intolerant. Stacey, don't worry about my answers being downvoted - I do not mind. I don't have any testosterone in me, so to me it is kind of funny.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:55 PM

Why the downvote? Please comment if you downvote, people!

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 24, 2012
at 09:30 PM

I did have the "among other things" in there. If the OP was "eating clean" whatever it was that was causing leaky gut stopped causing the gut to leak. And whether or not your have gluten sensitivity, if you have a leaky gut (from anything) then the gluten proteins can get into your blood and start an autoimmune response to transglutaminase.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on September 24, 2012
at 06:39 PM

How about remember that gluten is falsely believed to increase intestinal permeability among people without gluten intolerance. The evidence for this has yet to surface. There's a difference between celiacs, people who react badly to gluten, and people who don't react to it at all. Your answer seems to ignore the latter group.

8c8e71eb729c0edb4786c6f3ba8614e4

(568)

on September 24, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Thanks, I kind of guessed it might be something along those lines. I don't intend to keep exposing myself, but its good to know that I won't end up ridiculously sensitive and have to worry about the tiniest cross contamination when travelling, etc.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 24, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Yeah. I often find that with food sensitivities like that, if I have it once, I'm fine, but if I have it twice or more, symptoms return.

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4 Answers

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9
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 24, 2012
at 04:34 PM

I wouldn't say that you're "cured" but that you've healed and now can handle it occasionally.

Remember, gluten (among other things) irritates your gut lining and lets proteins directly into your blood because of the leaky gut (that's the autoimmune portion of gluten problems). So if you have constant gluten exposure then your gut is always irritated and inflamed and that's the problems that people don't even realize they have. If you go gluten free long enough to have complete healing of the gut (somewhere in the 6 month range), then basically you're starting with a clean slate. If your gut is healed, it's doing its job of keeping the bad stuff out. So a small gluten exposure should be handled properly because your gut is fixed. It will still cause a small amount of damage, but it should be easily fixed. However, if you keep exposing yourself to gluten, you'll get the cumulative damage again and be back where you started.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 24, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Yeah. I often find that with food sensitivities like that, if I have it once, I'm fine, but if I have it twice or more, symptoms return.

8c8e71eb729c0edb4786c6f3ba8614e4

(568)

on September 24, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Thanks, I kind of guessed it might be something along those lines. I don't intend to keep exposing myself, but its good to know that I won't end up ridiculously sensitive and have to worry about the tiniest cross contamination when travelling, etc.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on September 24, 2012
at 06:39 PM

How about remember that gluten is falsely believed to increase intestinal permeability among people without gluten intolerance. The evidence for this has yet to surface. There's a difference between celiacs, people who react badly to gluten, and people who don't react to it at all. Your answer seems to ignore the latter group.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 24, 2012
at 09:30 PM

I did have the "among other things" in there. If the OP was "eating clean" whatever it was that was causing leaky gut stopped causing the gut to leak. And whether or not your have gluten sensitivity, if you have a leaky gut (from anything) then the gluten proteins can get into your blood and start an autoimmune response to transglutaminase.

1
75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on November 11, 2012
at 08:47 PM

As others have stated, if you can clear up gut issues (bacterial imbalance, leaky gut) then you might find yourself being able to tolerate gluten to a certain degree. However if you have anti-gliadin antibodies present (that is, you suffer from celiac disease) I suspect gluten is off your menu for life.

I think for most the best one can hope for is gaining the ability to consume a modest amount of gluten infrequently without suffering severe consequences ... but not consume a full gluten-based meal. For example, nibbling on pretzels is okay but eating a bowel of spaghetti is not.

_Lazza

0
665c30b43694bae5ec5f32ab105e4aa4

on July 25, 2013
at 04:14 AM

I'm in the same situation, I had bad inflammation in intestine, I was reacting to gluten/wheat getting sick the next day for a few days.

I ate gluten by mistake and I got sick the next day, sores in the mouth etc...

I took a celiac blood panel and came negative, I took the biopsy and came negative but I had Helicobacter Pilory making ulcers.

After a few months gluten free, looks like I can eat a little without any issue (I don't try with more.. but I'll do under medical supervision)

Looks like Helicobacter can create a leaky gut and once this is healed gluten shouldn't be an issue, at least in small occasional portions.

0
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 11, 2012
at 07:56 PM

Yes, I believe that gluten sensitivity can be cured with time. Cured is not the right term. Rather, your sensitivity will diminish if you reduce your overall inflammatory response.

Gluten sensitivity is just a symptom, among many others. Remember, it is not a diagnosis.

The underlying issues are:

  1. gut dysbiosis/ gut flora imbalance/ leaky gut

  2. inflammation

The only solution to this is eating low-carb sugar-free grain-free nutritionally-rich diet. There are no other options.

Once your inflammation goes down and your gut is less inflamed, your gluten sensitivity will be greatly reduced. And that's what GAPS and similar diets help you to achieve.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:55 PM

Why the downvote? Please comment if you downvote, people!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 25, 2013
at 06:52 PM

I did not downvote myself. Most people don't think that it can be cured, they think it is hereditary. I thought so too when I became gluten-intolerant. Stacey, don't worry about my answers being downvoted - I do not mind. I don't have any testosterone in me, so to me it is kind of funny.

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