10

votes

Can Paleo MAKE You Gluten-Intolerant?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 26, 2012 at 12:58 AM

This may be a really dumb question but a co-worker got REALLY upset with me when I told her about how I ate a little gluten last night and became incredibly ill. She told me that I had chosen to make my self gluten intolerant by choosing this life style and basically called me an elitist, as I was choosing to make myself sick while hundreds of others suffered without a choice.

It was insulting and I want to think non-sensical but I need to make sure: Can eating clean bring about gluten sensitivity?

Thanks!

Kate

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 19, 2013
at 04:32 PM

You do not need approval from others to feel or to be awesome. Remove the downers in your life and cultivate those who appreciate you and want you to succeed - life's too short to worry about what one ignorant a-hole thinks, or rather, how she isn't capable of cogent thought.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 19, 2013
at 04:30 PM

There's always a choice, IFF you are informed about the truth. Media and advertising prevent that. Even when mainstream media says something interesting, they always add in weasel statements like "a balanced diet" or "you shouldn't take vitamin D3 even though we just told you how awesome it is", or "taking out grains isn't necessary..." etc. It's a perversion of the truth.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 18, 2013
at 11:53 AM

A slap across the face would have been appropriate - "That's for your comment."

Then a punch to the gut with "and now you know how it felt."

Violence, even if, just a fantasy, is always paleo. :)

Medium avatar

(624)

on December 16, 2013
at 05:55 PM

I think it a bit unfair to compare gluten to cyanide - or even "poison" - but it's clear that we can be made to tolerate this mild toxin and then lose that tolerance.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:29 PM

This is just my own thought process, certainly makes as much (more really) logical sense to me as the idea that cavemen who didn't consume grains were simply unable to.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:27 PM

A healthy gut shouldn't ever expose the immune system to these foreign proteins. Generations of folks have been eating wheat, dairy, various lectin-rich plants with no ill effect, the idea that only now we have an explosion of intolerance to these proteins suggests that it's not the proteins themselves that are problematic, but likely something else that has weakened our natural defense to such things.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:24 PM

All our food has cross reactivity in our bodies, not just gluten/caesin/lectins, whatever. Our bodies have evolved to deal with a variety of foreign proteins passing through our digestive systems. It makes no logical sense that we'd be so defenseless against a certain protein, particuarly proteins that aren't defensive by design. Gluten is not some toxin, it's a storage protein. The same goes for caesin. Lectins are there for recognition processes. All these "baddies" are only bad when something else is amiss.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:22 PM

The problem with gluten and caesin lies in leaky gut in my opinion. Not that they cause gut irritation in and of themselves, but rather leaky gut lets them out where they don't belong, we develop antibodies to them and that's the long road to degenerative disease.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 15, 2012
at 08:04 PM

I wonder about why there is such a difference between protein sources. All proteins are difficult to digest, but something sets casein and gluten apart. I wonder whether your gluten tolerance improved because eating a high meat Paleo diet improved your proteases in general.

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:27 PM

that process will reveal to you who your allies are.

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:27 PM

p.s. I think that people who make transformative life changes can cause people to get defensive. Food is personal. It's an ideology. To challenge it can provoke anger. My diet has angered a lot of friends who don't appreciate having my clean eating habits occurring right next to their beer battered mushrooms. I don't judge or say anything. I don't have to. People see your behavior and it illuminates what they perceive to be their own insufficiencies. You will always come up against this when doing something that others are not. It will either inspire or anger people, I have found and

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:13 PM

That's interesting that you say that. When I first quit gluten, my gut was a mess. I wasn't digesting food properly and despite a relatively healthy diet, I was suffering from nutrient deficiencies. After going gluten, grain and diary free, I noticed that as the years passed, if I accidentally got glutened -- the reaction was far less than it used to be. What used to be hellacious bloating, gas and acne is now a dull ache and it goes away quickly. I think my gut has healed. I'm afraid to try the things I gave up though, even though I think I might tolerate them a little better now.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on April 30, 2012
at 10:57 PM

Gluten makes me feel like I'm living in a fog. I was used to this fog my whole life until giving it up recently. Now the fog is much more noticeable. It's all relative!

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 28, 2012
at 10:46 AM

WOW!! This entry blows my mind!!! THANK YOU, Lisa!

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 27, 2012
at 05:01 PM

I think gluten is bad newz for loads of people, but there's a lot more to wheat than gluten. Fructans, wheat germ agglutenin, insoluble fiber, etc. These could also contribute to the upswing in health people feel when cutting out wheat. And honestly, some people don't feel miraculously better when they stop eating pizza. Gluten isn't the gut grenade to them like it is to me.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 27, 2012
at 04:34 PM

@DrChrista-That mechanism is only proven in people with celiac disease. If you know of evidence that gluten (or any prolamin) upregulates zonulin in anyone else, I'd love to see it, but to my knowledge there isn't any. Also, gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity are commonly referred to as the same thing.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 27, 2012
at 01:52 PM

There is always a choice.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 27, 2012
at 01:51 PM

NIcely done, Lisa. There is indeed a lot of information out there that gluten is associated with inflammation, whether or not you exhibit any "symptoms". It might not kill you fast if you're not intolerant or sensitive to it, but it certainly isn't doing you any good. Why not eat something with more nutritional bang for its buck?

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 27, 2012
at 01:40 PM

Down, boys... we're here to help each other...

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on April 27, 2012
at 12:42 AM

So true. I can't smoke cigarettes or eat bread anymore.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 26, 2012
at 10:51 PM

In the long run, if you radiate robust health and high energy she'll probably re-think her reaction. People who scoffed or were negative about my eating change now ask interested questions because they can see how well I've done compared to before.

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:56 PM

I dont know how gluten affects me negatively, if it does at all..but just because you dont feel any bad effects doesn't mean its not bad for you. I am trying to remain gluten free for 30+ days , then try to eat some and see what it does to me. If it is bad, i won't blame paleo, it means I am INTOLERANT...there is no "downside" to discovering you are gluten intolerant...

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:49 PM

It has plenty to do with understanding why they were sharing what they ate if you accept Deborah Tannen's theories on gender and discourse (not sayin' I do). She argues, to be extremely reductive, that women "share" in conversation, while men "one-up" each other.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:38 PM

... wrong with me. Until one doctor suggested I would go gluten free. And then I got lactose intolerant, soy intolerant, grain intolerant, legume intolerant, developed a bleeding gastric erosion (caused by autoimmune) , leaky gut and now my body is attacking my liver. I would not wish it to my worst enemy. Some days I have troubles getting up in the morning. This is what gluten did to me. I hope you never experience this in your life. And people need to know this. If somebody would warned me years ago, I would not in the condition I am in now.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:33 PM

You are right, I cannot predict longevity. But consuming gluten does not increase longevity - this is something I know for sure. That was a figure of speech. You cannot take words directly. As for me having an adverse reaction for gluten - all my life I ate bread (my culture is based on bread - we eat bread with every meal), pies, cakes with no bad reaction whatsoever. Till I got so sick that I had to quit my job and I am still in no condition to work. Because my symptoms were atypical (my blood test came back negative and I did not have any GI symptoms) nobody could figure out what was

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Also, while I agree that some people with celiac do this, I think it makes about as much sense for celiacs to begrudge non-celiacs from gluten-free diets as it does for me, as a celiac who is sensitive to below 10ppm, to begrudge celiacs who are much less sensitive and can tolerate closer to 200ppm.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:45 PM

Has it been shown that gluten-sensitivity isn't just pre-celiac? Celiac disease is thought to require a genetic predisposition plus a triggering event. But before the triggering event, is there still damage being done to the gut lining, enough to cause more subtle symptoms like mental health disorders (as opposed to diarrhea for 2 years, which is decidedly not subtle)? I think it's possible, and as far as I can tell, hasn't been looked at.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:42 PM

I pay a lot of attention to my parent's health VB, because their lives will predict my outcome better than an anonymous caveman. They've outlived their parents by 10 years, and what I see is better physical condition by staying active and not being as overweight. Would paleo get them to 106? Maybe, but maybe Med diet or living like Jack Lalanne would too. My family traditionally dies from stroke and heart disease, and my ancestors ate lots of fat AND carbs. You're in no position to make an intelligent prediction of anyone's longevity IMO.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Read the question again VB. The question is whether you as a paleo dieter have adverse reactions from eating gluten. You provide plenty of rebuttal testimony to the co-worker, but no mention of what gluten does to you. This interests me because I do not avoid gluten and would like to know what would happen to me if I did. Apparently there's a downside.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:57 PM

@Dr.Christa. I have already converted at least 20 people to go gluten free. Nobody is ready for Paleo yet (too drastic) but telling them about how I got sick always works. ALWAYS. Especially when I tell them about complication of having celiac disease, gastric erosion, leaky gut and my liver problems. Works like a charm. So don't worry about disordered eating. People have the right to know.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:54 PM

@thhg - yes, I did answer the question. When your parents were growing up, there was no gluten in their facial cream, toothpaste or canned foods. Bread had less gluten. Wheat had less gluten. They had less exposure to gluten. If you want your parents to live till 106, please tell them to eat vegetables and fish, as well as berries.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:51 PM

@thhg - are your parents healthy?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:24 PM

Drchrista had an excellent response. Most of the rest of the responses here are rebuttals to the co-worker, which do nothing to answer the question of whether paleo causes gluten intolerance.

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:09 PM

I think gluten sensitivity is being confused with gluten intolerance. We are not all intolerant, but there is a proven mechanism by which many of us are gluten sensitive. In gluten sensitivity, gluten up regulates a protein zonulin in the gut which dissolves the tight junctions between enterocytes. This allows pieces of indigested protein, LPSs and other things to cross the gut and incite an immune reaction by the GALT (gut-associated lymphoid tissue). This process appears to be promoted by prolamines that can be found in all grains and is thought to be one of the reasons Paleo 'works.'

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Thanks. I don't see anything in the question that indicates that the co-worker was gluten intolerant. Over on non-paleo diet boards I see a lot of the "I wish" thinking of true celiacs, as well as the militant gluten-free faddists. I would hope that true paleos would not link arms with the faddists in calling gluten evil.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Also, lots of people are answering the question, just not in the way that you agree with and like. ;P

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:22 PM

thhq, you really don't think these people had a susceptibility/sensitivity to gluten beforehand? The whole notion that going gluten-free can *cause* gluten intolerance just adds more fuel to the people who advise against trying a gluten-free diet. I just don't see any evidence that it can cause a sensitivity where there was none. And the only mechanism I can think of is something like what Dave S. mentions above. But since we have a large population who is genetically likely to be sensitive to gluten, the bacteria things seems like less powerful an explanatory factor.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Yeah, I don't think you really know unless you try it out for a month (or however long), or if you have genetic markers that make you susceptible.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Yeah, that's what I'm saying, I don't think you really know unless you try it out for a month (or however long), or if you have genetic markers that make you susceptible.

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:14 PM

While I do think its really important to educate people about the potential dangers of gluten, I think creating anxiety over it to the point where people are hiding it from you is counterproductive and could induce disordered eating. Perhaps it would be more productive to show your friends and family how delicious food can be even without gluten by teaching them to cook gluten-free or cooking gluten-free meals for them.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:39 PM

People are afraid of what they don't know. They also believe whatever they are spoon fed, whether they want to admit it or not. For many years, I believed that whole wheat was important and taking it out of your diet was insane. Obviously, I have seen the light! I also never read labels before, and am very thankful that there are more and more gluten free options out there. I even see restaurants starting to cater more to gluten free.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:18 PM

Stephan Guyenet did an experiment with many of his readers where they gave up gluten for one month. About half reported feeling better and the other half reported no difference. Very unscientific (non-random uncontrolled etc.) - but interesting all the same.

90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on April 26, 2012
at 02:15 PM

I felt fine when I ate gluten. I feel better without it. I'm in no place to say what works for everyone, but I suspect that anyone who eliminates gluten from their diet will benefit to some degree.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:15 PM

There is a plausible alternative explanation, but you might have to dig through Lucas Tarfur's blog a bit. There is a bacterium that can break down gluten proteins. It exists in saliva and the duodenum. Perhaps not eating gluten causes a die-off and then reintroducing it gives all the well established problems. Just a weak hypothesis...

A291bb4545000cb0ffdfd0ba8efe322d

on April 26, 2012
at 01:52 PM

@DanielleNo812 You must be a feminist, why would you bring gender into a food topic? whats that have to do with her question?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:06 PM

Sorry I missed the point. I didn't realize that it was just hyperbole.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:02 PM

Yeah and so what. Telling someone that gluten made you sick is a gender-neutral bad way to recommend paleo to anyone who likes eating bread and cupcakes. Stick with the positives: more meat, more activity.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:48 PM

@Thhq, you must be a man. Women talk. It's what they do. How about offering a solution instead of critisizing Kate's choices to discuss her life with a co-worker.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:47 PM

I can understand this to a point. I seriously doubt I am gluten intolerant, but back in the day when I did eat SAD, my stmoach would bloat and I would feel like CRAP if I ate too much bread - flash back to Macaroni Grill's bread dipped in olive oil + pasta for dinner. I never feel like that anymore since eating Paleo.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:46 PM

You've just insulted my 86 year old parents, still happily eating their cookies and sandwiches. And you've not answered the question, just thrown gasoline onto the fire.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:45 PM

@Thhq, this is supposed to be a place where we help eachother and answer questions, not insult people and give smart ass comments.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:44 PM

@Thhq, I think we all know gluten is not cyanide. PrimalSteve was maknig a point.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:43 PM

Well said, Caveman.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:40 PM

I healed my body by eating less and getting out of my chair.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:33 PM

+1 for being the only person who answered the original question. Many people report effects like you have seen on Paleohacks. Whether gluten avoidance produces a health benefit or not is another question, but avoidance does appear to sensitize a lot of people to it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:26 PM

Why did you even bring up what you ate last night? If you talk about getting sick, don't be ungrateful if someone suggests a remedy. Even if you don't like it.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:50 AM

Okay... maybe not ALL people are gluten sensitive. I wouldn't have called myself gluten sensitive before I took it out of my diet. But now that I have removed it, I have noticed positive health effects and a loss of negative symptoms I didn't even notice. I was a healthy young adult on a SHAD and assumed that my back pain and regular discomfort was just a sign of getting older. Now, I feel fantastic... I don't know, that's just my opinion about it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:42 AM

Now THAT'S elitism. Me vs you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:40 AM

Gluten is not cyanide.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:40 AM

All well and good, but if you eat gluten and feel fine why ever stop eating it? People smoke because they enjoy it, but there's major health risk. Eating gluten doesn't pose any major health risk to most people.

016de26fe61daf799662d3b7b2468324

(688)

on April 26, 2012
at 06:09 AM

I have a friend who is very touchy about this also. From what I've observed, I think she's just upset that she struggles so much and doesn't feel it's "fair" that people like me can opt in or out of gluten without noticing virtually any side effects. She feels frustrated, and often left out of social events b/c of her food limitations. Usually when people are mad at you, it's about them, not you.

90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on April 26, 2012
at 04:31 AM

Well, I don't know your co-worker, maybe she has her good points. One of my good friends (and roommate!) is a dietician with pretty mainstream views. We generally avoid the topic of diet so as not to offend/annoy one another, but sometimes she has come off as a super-arrogant know-it-all. And I probably do too. So we forgive and forget.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:28 AM

We are not all gluten sensitive. There is no evidence to support that.

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:25 AM

see my comment above...it applies.... taking small dosed of poison to become tolerant doesn't mean its still not poison....you can't make yourself intolerant to something that you were always intolerant of and just didn't know it...

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:20 AM

seemy comment above...it applies.... taking small dosed of poison to become tolerant doesn't mean its still not poison....you can't make yourself intolerant to something that you were always intolerant of and just didn't know it...

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:11 AM

brilliant. if i really cared to carry this conversation forward, i would share this with her. i agree about what you've said about awareness on so many levels: i read labels, i ask questions i never did. i too see signs from my past and wish i was aware 10 years ago. but yes, there ARE people against this. i have no idea why.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:50 AM

you know, she is weight obsessed (though she doesn't need to be it seems to me). i wouldn't mind losing a few but honestly, i am doing this purely for health reasons at this point. to put it in short form:she probably does lust after them but as a calorie-counter, she deprives herself. i don't lust. i know if i eat one, i will be sick. i don't feel deprived. i feel liberated.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:48 AM

I have a friend with the same situation - she cut it but when she adds it in she has no serious illness (though she gets a lot of bloating and weight gain). However, I have heard the number closer to 80% for people who are sensitive to it but much smaller for celiacs (which is a much stronger version of the sensitivity and autoimmune, I believe?). Regardless, gluten has a tendency to be pro-inflammatory, which means that if you have inflammation from other things gluten tends to make it worse.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:47 AM

good point; i smoked once too but i can't even take a puff now w/o feeling kind of sick. i liked this woman before but now...well, it has changed. i will be careful.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:45 AM

lol! darn if i couldn't have a comeback like this on the tip of my paleo tounge

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:30 AM

I agree, Marianna, you probably already were sensitive to gluten and just didn't realize it. I went about 30 years having no idea I was intolerant to gluten. Now, diagnosed with celiac disease, I'm so sensitive that I get sick if I walk into a bakery. Sure, it seems like I'm more sensitive than I was before, but looking back I see how awful I felt during times I ate more gluten.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:26 AM

it's not uncommon for someone who is allergic to something to appear more allergic to it once they're not being constantly exposed to it. It's the ol' story of the lady who had grown up with cats and was mildly stuffy a lot, but once she stopped having cats living with her all the time ends up having a much more violent allergic reaction to them. This is how allergy shots work... consistent low exposure. It doesn't cure it, just changes the reaction.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:24 AM

I am not sure we're all gluten sensitive. I think the 30% or so who have the genetic markers for celiac disease are sensitive to some degree, but I'm not sure that the rest of the population is. I say this because my husband, who normally eats gluten free on my behalf, has no ill effects on the rare occasion he does eat gluten.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:23 AM

people get defensive when their beliefs are called into question.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:16 AM

I'm wondering that too...but see comments above - maybe we already WERE and this just made it stand out more!

A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:16 AM

At least in the US, I think our industrial/corporatist food system has limited the choice or, at least, perception of choice for a lot of folk. Government subsidies cause some--unhealthy--food to be far preferable from a budgetary standpoint. For a lot of families, eating a lot of fruits, vegetables, and meats is not in the budget when pasta, rice, white bread, corn products, etc., are so cheap. (Many could probably change priorities and make it work, but I can't exclude the possibility that it is not possible for some.)

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Wish I worked with you!!!! THANK YOU!!!

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Hmmmmmmm.....:)

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:14 AM

you are SO right! It made me rethink about "sharing" things like this at work though. I mean, talking about diet goals and beliefs is not a big personal thing to me; it is interesting, good walter-cooler talk. This struck an ugly nerve w/ this woman however. I won't share anything like this w/ her again.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:12 AM

Thank you! I suspected this but darn if I knew for sure!

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:11 AM

It was a very odd moment - honestly, I was not sure how to respond!

Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:07 AM

I don't understand if you're suffering, why is she upset? I think she'd feel badly for you that you didn't feel well.

  • 4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

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20 Answers

21
90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on April 26, 2012
at 01:36 AM

Paleo can make you gluten intolerant in the same way that quitting smoking can make you tobacco intolerant. Years ago, I smoked half a pack a day and "felt fine". Now if I smoke one or two, I feel like death for two days. We do get desensitized to the ill-effects of the crap we put in our bodies, including gluten.

I hate judgemental people like your co-worker. Best of luck ignoring her and surrounding yourself with positive, supportive folks!

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:47 AM

good point; i smoked once too but i can't even take a puff now w/o feeling kind of sick. i liked this woman before but now...well, it has changed. i will be careful.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on April 27, 2012
at 12:42 AM

So true. I can't smoke cigarettes or eat bread anymore.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:40 AM

All well and good, but if you eat gluten and feel fine why ever stop eating it? People smoke because they enjoy it, but there's major health risk. Eating gluten doesn't pose any major health risk to most people.

90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on April 26, 2012
at 02:15 PM

I felt fine when I ate gluten. I feel better without it. I'm in no place to say what works for everyone, but I suspect that anyone who eliminates gluten from their diet will benefit to some degree.

90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on April 26, 2012
at 04:31 AM

Well, I don't know your co-worker, maybe she has her good points. One of my good friends (and roommate!) is a dietician with pretty mainstream views. We generally avoid the topic of diet so as not to offend/annoy one another, but sometimes she has come off as a super-arrogant know-it-all. And I probably do too. So we forgive and forget.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:43 PM

Well said, Caveman.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on April 30, 2012
at 10:57 PM

Gluten makes me feel like I'm living in a fog. I was used to this fog my whole life until giving it up recently. Now the fog is much more noticeable. It's all relative!

12
5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:04 AM

If you got sick it's because your body was reacting to it all the time, but you were just used to feeling (minorly) crappy all the time. The bigger reaction would be because you weren't constantly bombarding yourself with it so you had more to give.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:12 AM

Thank you! I suspected this but darn if I knew for sure!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:15 PM

There is a plausible alternative explanation, but you might have to dig through Lucas Tarfur's blog a bit. There is a bacterium that can break down gluten proteins. It exists in saliva and the duodenum. Perhaps not eating gluten causes a die-off and then reintroducing it gives all the well established problems. Just a weak hypothesis...

8
778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

on April 26, 2012
at 01:09 AM

I think it can make our already gluten intolerant bodies more sensitive. From what I understand, we are all gluten sensitive, it's just to what degree. Feel good that you are no longer poisoning yourself with an imperfect food source we'be been brainwashed to eat practically since birth. Your co-worker can say and believe what she chooses. That doesn't make her right. Keep your chin up. All that matters is how YOU feel!

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:14 AM

you are SO right! It made me rethink about "sharing" things like this at work though. I mean, talking about diet goals and beliefs is not a big personal thing to me; it is interesting, good walter-cooler talk. This struck an ugly nerve w/ this woman however. I won't share anything like this w/ her again.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:18 PM

Stephan Guyenet did an experiment with many of his readers where they gave up gluten for one month. About half reported feeling better and the other half reported no difference. Very unscientific (non-random uncontrolled etc.) - but interesting all the same.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:23 AM

people get defensive when their beliefs are called into question.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:48 AM

I have a friend with the same situation - she cut it but when she adds it in she has no serious illness (though she gets a lot of bloating and weight gain). However, I have heard the number closer to 80% for people who are sensitive to it but much smaller for celiacs (which is a much stronger version of the sensitivity and autoimmune, I believe?). Regardless, gluten has a tendency to be pro-inflammatory, which means that if you have inflammation from other things gluten tends to make it worse.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:28 AM

We are not all gluten sensitive. There is no evidence to support that.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Yeah, I don't think you really know unless you try it out for a month (or however long), or if you have genetic markers that make you susceptible.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:50 AM

Okay... maybe not ALL people are gluten sensitive. I wouldn't have called myself gluten sensitive before I took it out of my diet. But now that I have removed it, I have noticed positive health effects and a loss of negative symptoms I didn't even notice. I was a healthy young adult on a SHAD and assumed that my back pain and regular discomfort was just a sign of getting older. Now, I feel fantastic... I don't know, that's just my opinion about it.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 27, 2012
at 04:34 PM

@DrChrista-That mechanism is only proven in people with celiac disease. If you know of evidence that gluten (or any prolamin) upregulates zonulin in anyone else, I'd love to see it, but to my knowledge there isn't any. Also, gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity are commonly referred to as the same thing.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Yeah, that's what I'm saying, I don't think you really know unless you try it out for a month (or however long), or if you have genetic markers that make you susceptible.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:24 AM

I am not sure we're all gluten sensitive. I think the 30% or so who have the genetic markers for celiac disease are sensitive to some degree, but I'm not sure that the rest of the population is. I say this because my husband, who normally eats gluten free on my behalf, has no ill effects on the rare occasion he does eat gluten.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:47 PM

I can understand this to a point. I seriously doubt I am gluten intolerant, but back in the day when I did eat SAD, my stmoach would bloat and I would feel like CRAP if I ate too much bread - flash back to Macaroni Grill's bread dipped in olive oil + pasta for dinner. I never feel like that anymore since eating Paleo.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 27, 2012
at 05:01 PM

I think gluten is bad newz for loads of people, but there's a lot more to wheat than gluten. Fructans, wheat germ agglutenin, insoluble fiber, etc. These could also contribute to the upswing in health people feel when cutting out wheat. And honestly, some people don't feel miraculously better when they stop eating pizza. Gluten isn't the gut grenade to them like it is to me.

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:09 PM

I think gluten sensitivity is being confused with gluten intolerance. We are not all intolerant, but there is a proven mechanism by which many of us are gluten sensitive. In gluten sensitivity, gluten up regulates a protein zonulin in the gut which dissolves the tight junctions between enterocytes. This allows pieces of indigested protein, LPSs and other things to cross the gut and incite an immune reaction by the GALT (gut-associated lymphoid tissue). This process appears to be promoted by prolamines that can be found in all grains and is thought to be one of the reasons Paleo 'works.'

6
321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

on April 26, 2012
at 01:33 AM

you made yourslef gluten intolerant is like saying you made yourself cyanide intolerant...

you can make yourself tolerant of cyanide and gluten, doesn't make it any less poisonous....

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:06 PM

Sorry I missed the point. I didn't realize that it was just hyperbole.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:45 AM

lol! darn if i couldn't have a comeback like this on the tip of my paleo tounge

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:40 AM

Gluten is not cyanide.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:44 PM

@Thhq, I think we all know gluten is not cyanide. PrimalSteve was maknig a point.

Medium avatar

(624)

on December 16, 2013
at 05:55 PM

I think it a bit unfair to compare gluten to cyanide - or even "poison" - but it's clear that we can be made to tolerate this mild toxin and then lose that tolerance.

6
70a0c15f6d9098025b28f3b0144c9b6f

on April 26, 2012
at 01:13 AM

That co-worker is not your friend. Ignore her, forget her, her future unhealth and sickness is not your problem if shes not interested. You reacted to a poison your body was no longer used to. What exactly would she KNOW about your health? End of story.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:42 AM

Now THAT'S elitism. Me vs you.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Wish I worked with you!!!! THANK YOU!!!

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:45 PM

@Thhq, this is supposed to be a place where we help eachother and answer questions, not insult people and give smart ass comments.

5
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:53 AM

I just don't understand the attitude of your coworker. As a very sensitive celiac, I am grateful that so many people are trying gluten-free diets and raising awareness. The more people are aware, the better labeling will get.

As for whether it makes you more sensitive, Jenna hit the nail on the head. But I want to go a little further. The risk of not going gluten-free if you have celiac disease (and probably also gluten intolerance in general) is an increased risk of cancer. Even if you don't think you're gluten intolerant, the risk is still there. So uncovering it with a gluten-free diet, even if it means more hassle and being more sensitive, is a great tradeoff.

I went 30 years not realizing I am intolerant to gluten. In retrospect, I can see the signs were clear, but I had considered and discarded the issue long ago, and never went on a gluten-free diet (until this past year) because I didn't want to "follow a fad diet" or needlessly restrict what I ate... basically, because I succumbed to this negative attitude that some people (including a lot of nutritionists!) have.

I wish I had tried a gluten-free diet sooner. I wish I had learned about this stuff years ago. Maybe it would have saved my dad (who probably also had celiac disease) from cancer. Who knows. But this attitude that going gluten-free is somehow bad makes me want to scream. How many lives can we save by raising awareness? And if someone finds they aren't gluten sensitive, and they want to go back to eating gluten, no big deal. I just don't see why some people are so against it.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:11 AM

brilliant. if i really cared to carry this conversation forward, i would share this with her. i agree about what you've said about awareness on so many levels: i read labels, i ask questions i never did. i too see signs from my past and wish i was aware 10 years ago. but yes, there ARE people against this. i have no idea why.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:39 PM

People are afraid of what they don't know. They also believe whatever they are spoon fed, whether they want to admit it or not. For many years, I believed that whole wheat was important and taking it out of your diet was insane. Obviously, I have seen the light! I also never read labels before, and am very thankful that there are more and more gluten free options out there. I even see restaurants starting to cater more to gluten free.

3
3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

on April 26, 2012
at 03:03 PM

Just to be clear here, there is a difference between gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity. In a broad sense, no, eating Paleo does not make you either of these things. Celiac disease is defined as a gluten intolerance. In this case, the body makes antibodies to its own small intestine tissue as a result of exposure to gluten and this is why it is defined as an autoimmune disease. It is genetic in nature, but many factors can affect the expression of the gene. I've seen a case of Celiac disease that developed in a 46 year old woman after a course of antibiotics for a sinus infection. Until that time she denied having any symptoms related to anything she ate, so should we say that antibiotics cause gluten intolerance too? Since it is genetically based, eating Paleo can not "give" you gluten intolerance, rather by removing gut irritants it can give the gut a chance to heal. Since there is much inflammation happening in the gut mucosa in this condition, the immune system has a limited ability to react to gluten in this inflamed state. Calm down the inflammation and the immune system reacts to gluten more 'normally' if the predisposition to gluten intolerance or sensitivity is there.

In the case of gluten sensitivity, the inflammation of the gut is present as a result of gluten exposure, but there is not the autoimmune component. However, Dr. Fasano's work at the Univ of Maryland's Celiac center has shown that gluten sensitivity, by inflaming the gut and creating 'leaky gut,' can set the stage so to speak, for the development of other autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals. This is why some might develop RA, others MS, and others multiple AI diseases and subsequently why we see dramatic improvements in these folks when they adopt a Paleo diet. (Also see Robb Wolf's latest blog post for the link to works by a doc who was talking about this connection over 50 years ago.)

As for your coworker's response, I find this somewhat common in those diagnosed with Celiac disease. Two things I believe are at play here. First, these folks have really bad reactions when they eat something contaminated with gluten. If gluten-free diets are perceived as merely a fad diet, they risk not being taken seriously by waitstaff, chefs, and other food service personnel. Its not like an anaphylaxtic reaction that can be seen immediately, so its' really important that the food service industry understand the seriousness of the consequences. If you're Paleo and going to a restaurant, and if you ask for no bun with your burger because you're "gluten- free" and then chose to cheat and order a beer, this can undermine the seriousness of gluten-free for those that really suffer from it. Also, if you have diagnosed Celiac disease, gluten-free foods are considered "medical foods" and can therefore be deducted as medical expenses for tax purposes. Potentially the "fad" of gluten-free could jeopardize this.

The second reason is as someone else already stated- for a person with a gluten intolerance, there can be a real frustration that they have no choice but to eat gluten free. They wish things could back to "normal" and they could eat all their old foods again. They are tired and frustrated with having to be so careful about everything they eat all the time. From this perspective, it can be hard for them to understand why anyone would voluntarily choose to take on that level care when eating. I think education is really important here and that practitioners can help these patients see that in the end, this is an advantage as they will be healthier, rather then a burden. If we can all agree that the end goal is being healthier, these kinds of situations may no longer arise in the future.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:45 PM

Has it been shown that gluten-sensitivity isn't just pre-celiac? Celiac disease is thought to require a genetic predisposition plus a triggering event. But before the triggering event, is there still damage being done to the gut lining, enough to cause more subtle symptoms like mental health disorders (as opposed to diarrhea for 2 years, which is decidedly not subtle)? I think it's possible, and as far as I can tell, hasn't been looked at.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Thanks. I don't see anything in the question that indicates that the co-worker was gluten intolerant. Over on non-paleo diet boards I see a lot of the "I wish" thinking of true celiacs, as well as the militant gluten-free faddists. I would hope that true paleos would not link arms with the faddists in calling gluten evil.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Also, while I agree that some people with celiac do this, I think it makes about as much sense for celiacs to begrudge non-celiacs from gluten-free diets as it does for me, as a celiac who is sensitive to below 10ppm, to begrudge celiacs who are much less sensitive and can tolerate closer to 200ppm.

2
7ee3b43736fa2ad734e85c027411e8d5

on April 27, 2012
at 02:52 AM

My recent conversation with Robb Wolf:

Lisa Miller I've gotten this stance before as well from others and would like to know how to respond :...

Re article: Can Paleo MAKE You Gluten-Intolerant? - PaleoHacks.com paleohacks.com This may be a really dumb question but a co-worker got REALLY upset with me when I told her about how I ate a little gluten last night and became incredibly ill. She told me that I had chosen to make my self gluten intolerant by choosing this life style and basically called me an elitist, as I was c...

Robb Wolf Because you REACT more strongly than with constant exposure does not make an argument for constant exposure!

Lisa Miller Yes you are right ... However I hate that they are correct to say this to me as if I am doing myself a disservice ... any more scientific comebacks would be appreciated??? jimmy Moore said you were the best resource for this .....

Robb Wolf Walk yourself through this...you are doing yourself a disservice by NOT consuming a known toxin? We can easily see C-reactive protein go DOWN!! These people are m*r*ns, we can show via Flow Cytometry and other means of testing that folks have less inflammation AND we know that many of the problems generated with gluten are far reaching, many do not even show GI issues. Lisa, you are arguing with people who have no god-damned education in these topics. It's like speaking German to non-German speakers...it is meaningless as they do not have the basic requisites to even sit at the big-kid table to discuss this.

So: 1-We can show favorable changes via blood work with gluten removal 2-We see a shocking improvement in a host of ailments with gluten removal 3-The people you are arguing with have no education on this matter to even posit a position.

Robb Wolf Feel free to post this on your timeline and link me to it.

Lisa Miller Thank you for setting this straight Robb. You're the best and the reason why I'm making changes in my life. It has taken well over a year to really commit with everything I've got. I understand that I have to set the example, talking about it and understanding it is not enough. I have to do this for me first! If it helps others as a result great. I'm not trying to take their candy away, I just want them to live healthy.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 27, 2012
at 01:51 PM

NIcely done, Lisa. There is indeed a lot of information out there that gluten is associated with inflammation, whether or not you exhibit any "symptoms". It might not kill you fast if you're not intolerant or sensitive to it, but it certainly isn't doing you any good. Why not eat something with more nutritional bang for its buck?

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 28, 2012
at 10:46 AM

WOW!! This entry blows my mind!!! THANK YOU, Lisa!

2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:22 PM

I'm with those who say "paleo" doesn't cause the sensitivity/intolerance.

I'd felt crappy much of my life but had no clue wheat was my problem until I experienced the improvement from wheat's absence and the acute symptoms from having a meal that included some. At that point, your question was highly relevant.

However, what actually happened was that as my gut continued to heal subsequent tests of eating wheat triggered reactions that were milder and milder. Finally, at about the 10-month point, I ate something with wheat and had no negative symptoms at all.

I think if avoiding wheat was causing my sensitivity, I wouldn't have seen milder and milder reactions over time. The reactions would have stayed bad or gotten even worse.

I count myself as one of the lucky ones. Despite 60+ years of gut distress I was able to recover and thrive. Now and then I eat a little corn--I like crunchy yellow taco shells/chips--but I've finally lost my taste for wheat and probably won't purposefully eat it again. At least I have hope now that accidentally ingesting wheat-adulterated food won't make me ill.

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:13 PM

That's interesting that you say that. When I first quit gluten, my gut was a mess. I wasn't digesting food properly and despite a relatively healthy diet, I was suffering from nutrient deficiencies. After going gluten, grain and diary free, I noticed that as the years passed, if I accidentally got glutened -- the reaction was far less than it used to be. What used to be hellacious bloating, gas and acne is now a dull ache and it goes away quickly. I think my gut has healed. I'm afraid to try the things I gave up though, even though I think I might tolerate them a little better now.

2
Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on April 26, 2012
at 03:11 AM

When the body is exhausted using all resources to combat multiple oppenents, many things go un-noticed. When healed, one thing seems that much more obvious.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:40 PM

I healed my body by eating less and getting out of my chair.

2
A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:38 AM

Is she gluten intolerant? Does she resent people who "could" eat it but don't? Maybe she just lusts after cupcakes.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:50 AM

you know, she is weight obsessed (though she doesn't need to be it seems to me). i wouldn't mind losing a few but honestly, i am doing this purely for health reasons at this point. to put it in short form:she probably does lust after them but as a calorie-counter, she deprives herself. i don't lust. i know if i eat one, i will be sick. i don't feel deprived. i feel liberated.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 04:07 PM

If anything I've become even more gluten tolerant than I was before. I, personally, went through a gluten-intolerant phase (or at least I convinced myself of such) after starting paleo. Now, pfft, I can gluten it up all I want, and there's zero effect. I do stay gluten-free most of the time, but deviations are not met with any discomfort.

Then again, I'm not buying into the paleo theory of gluten intolerance anymore.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:27 PM

A healthy gut shouldn't ever expose the immune system to these foreign proteins. Generations of folks have been eating wheat, dairy, various lectin-rich plants with no ill effect, the idea that only now we have an explosion of intolerance to these proteins suggests that it's not the proteins themselves that are problematic, but likely something else that has weakened our natural defense to such things.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:24 PM

All our food has cross reactivity in our bodies, not just gluten/caesin/lectins, whatever. Our bodies have evolved to deal with a variety of foreign proteins passing through our digestive systems. It makes no logical sense that we'd be so defenseless against a certain protein, particuarly proteins that aren't defensive by design. Gluten is not some toxin, it's a storage protein. The same goes for caesin. Lectins are there for recognition processes. All these "baddies" are only bad when something else is amiss.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:22 PM

The problem with gluten and caesin lies in leaky gut in my opinion. Not that they cause gut irritation in and of themselves, but rather leaky gut lets them out where they don't belong, we develop antibodies to them and that's the long road to degenerative disease.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 15, 2012
at 08:04 PM

I wonder about why there is such a difference between protein sources. All proteins are difficult to digest, but something sets casein and gluten apart. I wonder whether your gluten tolerance improved because eating a high meat Paleo diet improved your proteases in general.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 15, 2012
at 10:29 PM

This is just my own thought process, certainly makes as much (more really) logical sense to me as the idea that cavemen who didn't consume grains were simply unable to.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:34 PM

Please tell your co-worker that you chose to live longer than all other people who consume gluten on a regular basis. 30% of all people carry those genes. The amount of people who are gluten intolerant doubles every 15 years. Most people who are gluten intolerant have no idea that they are (like me). I learned about gluten intolerance when I got so sick I was bedridden.

Also tell her that if she has silent celiac disease and does not know about it, she will die way before her time from either cancer or any other complications.

Everything is fine and dandy when you are in your 20s. But once you pass the mark of 30 - life is no longer a picnic and you pay for every breadcrumb you have ever consumed.

I play food police with all my friends and relatives. I check what they eat. They are even hiding bread so I don't see it when I visit them, otherwise they know they are going to hear an hour long lecture on dangers of gluten.

Your colleague is lucky you are such a nice person. If I would be her colleague, she would be scared to look at a picture of anything even related to gluten.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:57 PM

@Dr.Christa. I have already converted at least 20 people to go gluten free. Nobody is ready for Paleo yet (too drastic) but telling them about how I got sick always works. ALWAYS. Especially when I tell them about complication of having celiac disease, gastric erosion, leaky gut and my liver problems. Works like a charm. So don't worry about disordered eating. People have the right to know.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:38 PM

... wrong with me. Until one doctor suggested I would go gluten free. And then I got lactose intolerant, soy intolerant, grain intolerant, legume intolerant, developed a bleeding gastric erosion (caused by autoimmune) , leaky gut and now my body is attacking my liver. I would not wish it to my worst enemy. Some days I have troubles getting up in the morning. This is what gluten did to me. I hope you never experience this in your life. And people need to know this. If somebody would warned me years ago, I would not in the condition I am in now.

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:56 PM

I dont know how gluten affects me negatively, if it does at all..but just because you dont feel any bad effects doesn't mean its not bad for you. I am trying to remain gluten free for 30+ days , then try to eat some and see what it does to me. If it is bad, i won't blame paleo, it means I am INTOLERANT...there is no "downside" to discovering you are gluten intolerant...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:42 PM

I pay a lot of attention to my parent's health VB, because their lives will predict my outcome better than an anonymous caveman. They've outlived their parents by 10 years, and what I see is better physical condition by staying active and not being as overweight. Would paleo get them to 106? Maybe, but maybe Med diet or living like Jack Lalanne would too. My family traditionally dies from stroke and heart disease, and my ancestors ate lots of fat AND carbs. You're in no position to make an intelligent prediction of anyone's longevity IMO.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:54 PM

@thhg - yes, I did answer the question. When your parents were growing up, there was no gluten in their facial cream, toothpaste or canned foods. Bread had less gluten. Wheat had less gluten. They had less exposure to gluten. If you want your parents to live till 106, please tell them to eat vegetables and fish, as well as berries.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Read the question again VB. The question is whether you as a paleo dieter have adverse reactions from eating gluten. You provide plenty of rebuttal testimony to the co-worker, but no mention of what gluten does to you. This interests me because I do not avoid gluten and would like to know what would happen to me if I did. Apparently there's a downside.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:46 PM

You've just insulted my 86 year old parents, still happily eating their cookies and sandwiches. And you've not answered the question, just thrown gasoline onto the fire.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:51 PM

@thhg - are your parents healthy?

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:14 PM

While I do think its really important to educate people about the potential dangers of gluten, I think creating anxiety over it to the point where people are hiding it from you is counterproductive and could induce disordered eating. Perhaps it would be more productive to show your friends and family how delicious food can be even without gluten by teaching them to cook gluten-free or cooking gluten-free meals for them.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:33 PM

You are right, I cannot predict longevity. But consuming gluten does not increase longevity - this is something I know for sure. That was a figure of speech. You cannot take words directly. As for me having an adverse reaction for gluten - all my life I ate bread (my culture is based on bread - we eat bread with every meal), pies, cakes with no bad reaction whatsoever. Till I got so sick that I had to quit my job and I am still in no condition to work. Because my symptoms were atypical (my blood test came back negative and I did not have any GI symptoms) nobody could figure out what was

1
E4848d0d7833cf974d5edfabf502dcc4

on April 26, 2012
at 01:11 AM

I believe I have made myself gluten intolerant. I was strict with Paleo my first 4 months and when I had some gluten on my 5th month I started to break out in hives. Now when I have it occasionally I break out everywhere.

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:16 AM

I'm wondering that too...but see comments above - maybe we already WERE and this just made it stand out more!

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:20 AM

seemy comment above...it applies.... taking small dosed of poison to become tolerant doesn't mean its still not poison....you can't make yourself intolerant to something that you were always intolerant of and just didn't know it...

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:30 AM

I agree, Marianna, you probably already were sensitive to gluten and just didn't realize it. I went about 30 years having no idea I was intolerant to gluten. Now, diagnosed with celiac disease, I'm so sensitive that I get sick if I walk into a bakery. Sure, it seems like I'm more sensitive than I was before, but looking back I see how awful I felt during times I ate more gluten.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 12:33 PM

+1 for being the only person who answered the original question. Many people report effects like you have seen on Paleohacks. Whether gluten avoidance produces a health benefit or not is another question, but avoidance does appear to sensitize a lot of people to it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:24 PM

Drchrista had an excellent response. Most of the rest of the responses here are rebuttals to the co-worker, which do nothing to answer the question of whether paleo causes gluten intolerance.

5f20e69b9609d29fea926e95bfbddd35

(237)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:26 AM

it's not uncommon for someone who is allergic to something to appear more allergic to it once they're not being constantly exposed to it. It's the ol' story of the lady who had grown up with cats and was mildly stuffy a lot, but once she stopped having cats living with her all the time ends up having a much more violent allergic reaction to them. This is how allergy shots work... consistent low exposure. It doesn't cure it, just changes the reaction.

321631b2e3931f601d2e9b1918b18ab4

(130)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:25 AM

see my comment above...it applies.... taking small dosed of poison to become tolerant doesn't mean its still not poison....you can't make yourself intolerant to something that you were always intolerant of and just didn't know it...

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Also, lots of people are answering the question, just not in the way that you agree with and like. ;P

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:22 PM

thhq, you really don't think these people had a susceptibility/sensitivity to gluten beforehand? The whole notion that going gluten-free can *cause* gluten intolerance just adds more fuel to the people who advise against trying a gluten-free diet. I just don't see any evidence that it can cause a sensitivity where there was none. And the only mechanism I can think of is something like what Dave S. mentions above. But since we have a large population who is genetically likely to be sensitive to gluten, the bacteria things seems like less powerful an explanatory factor.

0
58d456f4c4d551a697e65ada8c32ad4f

on May 15, 2012
at 05:13 PM

Half of life's battle seems to know your audience. I try not to talk to people about my diet/allergies/intolerances unless I know they are in the same boat. Without some sort of knowledge about it, people are really quick to judge or make assumptions.

0
35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:21 PM

Your co-worker is right. I have this friend who gave up drinking every day and now whenever she drinks one glass of wine she starts to feel drunk. She's such an elitist. If she continued to drink every day like the rest of us, then she wouldn't be in this situation. : )

"Because you REACT more strongly than with constant exposure does not make an argument for constant exposure!"

-Rob Wolf

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:27 PM

p.s. I think that people who make transformative life changes can cause people to get defensive. Food is personal. It's an ideology. To challenge it can provoke anger. My diet has angered a lot of friends who don't appreciate having my clean eating habits occurring right next to their beer battered mushrooms. I don't judge or say anything. I don't have to. People see your behavior and it illuminates what they perceive to be their own insufficiencies. You will always come up against this when doing something that others are not. It will either inspire or anger people, I have found and

35c8f0c35da258ac54165ef14195e0b8

(167)

on May 15, 2012
at 03:27 PM

that process will reveal to you who your allies are.

0
6996bca5d2417dbb2a361c50f7f687f0

on April 30, 2012
at 10:17 PM

This is like a recovering alcoholic yelling at other people for not drinking. So strange.

0
91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on April 27, 2012
at 12:35 AM

I've thought about this topic myself a lot and I'm fairly convinced that it's all to do with placebo/nocebo. I've accidentally eaten things that I much later discovered had gluten in them and felt absolutely fine. On the other hand, when I know there is gluten in something before I eat it, I tend to feel at least mildly nauseous after it. n=1 but still.

In fact, I think that it may even be a form of anxiety. Following this kind of lifestyle and constantly obsessing over nutrition with an orthorexic mentality can definitely lead to anxiety during "cheats" and that anxiety can manifest itself as any physical sensation that your brain wants it to.

0
4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

on April 26, 2012
at 10:18 PM

Thanks all...so much to think about. My co-worker and I didn't even say hello today. I feel sad about it. Didn't know dietary choices could be so offensive.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 26, 2012
at 10:51 PM

In the long run, if you radiate robust health and high energy she'll probably re-think her reaction. People who scoffed or were negative about my eating change now ask interested questions because they can see how well I've done compared to before.

0
57c466e70609e0294fd638eb9f32330f

on April 26, 2012
at 01:11 AM

Everyone has a 'choice' why are 'hundreds of others suffering without a choice'? :)

4dd2fa3cc0b04990dcf7e75c090f59a2

(95)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Hmmmmmmm.....:)

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 27, 2012
at 01:52 PM

There is always a choice.

A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on April 26, 2012
at 01:16 AM

At least in the US, I think our industrial/corporatist food system has limited the choice or, at least, perception of choice for a lot of folk. Government subsidies cause some--unhealthy--food to be far preferable from a budgetary standpoint. For a lot of families, eating a lot of fruits, vegetables, and meats is not in the budget when pasta, rice, white bread, corn products, etc., are so cheap. (Many could probably change priorities and make it work, but I can't exclude the possibility that it is not possible for some.)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 19, 2013
at 04:30 PM

There's always a choice, IFF you are informed about the truth. Media and advertising prevent that. Even when mainstream media says something interesting, they always add in weasel statements like "a balanced diet" or "you shouldn't take vitamin D3 even though we just told you how awesome it is", or "taking out grains isn't necessary..." etc. It's a perversion of the truth.

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