4

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Wheat-free soy sauce - exercise in futility?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 02, 2012 at 1:27 AM

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Thought the comics were funny. But the accompanying link with them was interesting. They took run of the mill soy sauce and analyzed it for gluten content. Less than 5 ppm - lower than the 20 ppm threshold for calling something gluten-free.

Now I've never been sensitive to gluten, but I do use wheat-free tamari. Guess I didn't bother looking through the wool pulled over my eyes. I do prefer my wheat-free tamari flavor-wise versus crappy run-of-the-mill soy sauce, might just stick to premium soy sauce and ditch the wheat-free hype.

Of course, the fact that wheat-proteins do not survive the fermentation process probably means that soy proteins are also unlikely to survive it. Maybe it's time to deflate the coconut amino bubble as well?

See: http://www.soya.be/gluten-free-soy-sauce.php And the report itself (it's in Dutch): http://www.soya.be/reports/gluten-free-soy-sauce.pdf

3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:29 PM

Plus those coconut aminos taste awful. Tamari should never have wheat in it. Shoyu does have wheat.

Medium avatar

(2432)

on April 03, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Yeah, wheat AND soy, but wheat is the ingredient listed first. It used to be only soy traditionally.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 02, 2012
at 12:30 PM

You mean soy sauce is made with wheat AND soy, right?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:35 AM

1 teaspoon is 4 grams, that's really nothing when it comes to a dose of sugar.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:20 AM

love the toons !

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4 Answers

2
Medium avatar

on April 02, 2012
at 09:29 AM

Well, almost all the soy sauce out there is made from wheat, not soybeans. Unless it says wheat free, its made from wheat. ANYWHERE you get regular asian food out, its wheat. Perhaps the fermentation and filtration process removes the gluten, but its still wheat.

Here in Japan, ironically, you can't buy wheat free or soybean made soysauce anywhere. All the food out, and in fine sushi bars, uses wheat 'soy' sauce. You can order a few online at specialty stores, but they are hard to find. The big companies that make organic wheat free tamari for sale in the west dont even sell it here.

I love to show Japanese people that their beloved shouyu is now made from wheat, not soy, as it was always traditionally. They always insist vehemently its soy, until I show them the Kanji on the ingredients list on the bottle. Gaijin brought wheat, and they ought to call it gaijin sauce now! LOL!

Whether or not it actually has gluten in it, when I eat any sauce that uses it, My gut reacts with irritation. I'm allergic to gluten, but as you point out, there's no gluten in there. So why does my gut react?

So I guess it IS futile.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 02, 2012
at 12:30 PM

You mean soy sauce is made with wheat AND soy, right?

Medium avatar

(2432)

on April 03, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Yeah, wheat AND soy, but wheat is the ingredient listed first. It used to be only soy traditionally.

2
2a0f1afde303eadc422d015fc22f7512

(1118)

on April 02, 2012
at 04:40 AM

Try coconut aminos...fermented coconut sap. GREAT soy replacement.

1
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:48 AM

I feel just as bad eating "gluten-free" soy sauce as I do eating regular soy sauce. So I would say the answer to your title question is yes, though probably not for the reasons you state. (and no, I wouldn't freak out over a "splash" but I surely won't dip my sushi in it).

I don't feel bad after consuming coconut aminos, though.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:16 AM

Do you really use that much of it? A splash here or there- im more concern about the amount of sugar in asian food. I have a recipe for a simple omelet that calls for a teaspoon of sugar per four eggs. go premium and trust the fermentation.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:35 AM

1 teaspoon is 4 grams, that's really nothing when it comes to a dose of sugar.

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