1

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Thomas Keller's Cup4Cup GF Flour?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 17, 2012 at 5:15 PM

What do y'all think about Keller's GF Flour, Cup4Cup? http://cup4cup.com/

Ingredients: Cornstarch, white rice flour, brown rice flour, milk powder, tapioca flour, potato starch, Xanthum gum

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 04, 2012
at 05:18 PM

Thanks Dave. lol

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 04, 2012
at 05:17 PM

Thankyou, Dave. lol.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 04, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Love the snark!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 04, 2012
at 01:21 PM

Saying it's "just a polysaccharide" is like saying gluten is "just" a protein. Chemical configuration matters. According to Wiki, it can cause allergic reactions, intestinal bloating and diarrhea. Oooh, sounds like fun! Yet again I say, adding bacterial shit to your food is non-evolutionary and it's better to err on the side of caution. If you want to use it, and it doesn't cause problems, then fine. In no way shape or form can xanthum gum or any other bacterial feces added to a processed food product be considered "real food". We all make exceptions and I'm far from perfect myself...

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on May 03, 2012
at 12:49 AM

Xanthum gum only sounds weird -- it's actually just a sugar (polysaccharide) created by a bacteria by fermenting corn. It's a natural thickener.

65b327e053ca531a6916d43c19e1eaad

(143)

on April 17, 2012
at 07:16 PM

Still processed crap.

2fdb7a6236b04bdfc3dacaf2bc236515

(528)

on April 17, 2012
at 05:21 PM

I think most people will consider it sub-opitmal or even bad. You start with grains: corn, rice, and rice. You follow it with powdered dairy, potatoes, and xanthan gum.... I wouldn't use it :)

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7 Answers

4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Anyone with a basic grasp of what the paleo diet is shouldn't need to ask.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 04, 2012
at 05:17 PM

Thankyou, Dave. lol.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 04, 2012
at 05:18 PM

Thanks Dave. lol

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 04, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Love the snark!

3
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 17, 2012
at 07:14 PM

Knowing Kellers stuff, its propably as optimal as gluten free flour can be culinary wise. He is obsessed perfectionist, makes many paleos pale by comparison ;)

2
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 17, 2012
at 05:48 PM

I suppose if you are only concerned with gluten, then, well, it's gluten-free.

Cornstarch - not paleo, might be tolerated
white rice flour - not paleo, but acceptable under PHD (safe starch doctrine)
brown rice flour - even PHD would say to avoid
milk powder - not paleo, might be considered Primal
tapioca flour - safe starch?
potato starch - safe starch?
Xanthum gum - best to avoid weird ingredients (precautionary principle), but YMMV...

Banded Girl is correct. It's not paleo, definitely sub-optimal and possibly bad for you

What did you want to do with it? (We could probably come up with some decent alternatives)

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on May 03, 2012
at 12:49 AM

Xanthum gum only sounds weird -- it's actually just a sugar (polysaccharide) created by a bacteria by fermenting corn. It's a natural thickener.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 04, 2012
at 01:21 PM

Saying it's "just a polysaccharide" is like saying gluten is "just" a protein. Chemical configuration matters. According to Wiki, it can cause allergic reactions, intestinal bloating and diarrhea. Oooh, sounds like fun! Yet again I say, adding bacterial shit to your food is non-evolutionary and it's better to err on the side of caution. If you want to use it, and it doesn't cause problems, then fine. In no way shape or form can xanthum gum or any other bacterial feces added to a processed food product be considered "real food". We all make exceptions and I'm far from perfect myself...

1
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on April 17, 2012
at 06:09 PM

I agree that this is a suboptimal flour choice. If you really want baked goods, try learning to cook with coconut flour. Almond flour, almond butter, sunflower seed butter and pumpkin seed butter all can be used for baking also. You can find lots of fabulous recipes on many of the Paleo blogs. Here's a Paleo quick bread recipe using Sunbutter as the base from my kid-friendly low oxalate blog (mostly Paleo/WAP).

http://lowoxalateinfo.com/sunflower-spice-paleo-quick-bread/

And a recipe for Paleo pancakes using coconut flour.

http://lowoxalateinfo.com/paleo-pancakes/

Keep searching for healthier recipes for the occasional baked good. I have used a few coconut flour recipes that also contain potato starch or a little rice flour. This is a very satisfying combination and will at least keep you in the "safe starch" realm.

0
705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

on November 30, 2012
at 12:12 AM

If Keller has endorsed it, I would try for for making a rare dessert to be enjoyed by those who have not bought into Paleo but is gluten free. Or for suggesting to a family member who is trying to cook me something gluten free.

I've used an Arrowhead mix GF a few times. C4C looks similar but Arrowhead is 70% the cost. Worth the premium to me if it tastes better.

Arrowhead Mills All Purpose Gluten Free Baking Mix: Organic rice flour, whole grain sorghum flour, organic tapioca starch flour, organic whole grain sorghum flour, leavening (sodium acid pyrophosphate, baking powder, monocalcium phosphate), inulin, rice bran extract, xanthan gum

0
E691b75fd847077d3eaeb168f43b8d07

on November 29, 2012
at 07:28 PM

I'm sorry, but I have to ask. If your commitment to "paleo" is supposed to mimic a supposed ancient diet, how would using Cup4Cup, or any other "substitute" that you make from processed starches, advance that goal? I'm not against C4C or any other such product, but then again, I eat cultivated plants and processed foods.

0
80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

on May 03, 2012
at 12:47 AM

Jeanne's Gluten Free All-Purpose Flour Mix is simpler and avoids the corn. http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2009/11/the-story-behind-my-gluten-free-flour-mix/

  • 1 1/4 C (170 g) brown rice flour
  • 1 1/4 C (205 g) white rice flour
  • 1 C (120 g) tapioca flour
  • 1 C (165 g) sweet rice flour (also known as glutinous rice flour or under the brand name, Mochiko)
  • 2 scant tsp. xanthan gum

Xanthum gum is a natural sugar (polysaccharide) created by a bacteria by fermenting corn. It's a natural thickener.

If you eliminated the brown rice flour, you would have a "safe starch" flour. But not Paleo, because it is still grain-based and processed.

Making things into flours increases the rate you absorb them so there are insulin/glucose consequences beyond where the starch is derived from. Also, things made with flour tend to be carbohydrate intense and not very nutritious.

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