3

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Recipe for a Gluten Free, Sourdough, Paleo 2.0 Bread?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 24, 2012 at 8:45 PM

Does anyone have a recipe for a gluten free, sourdough, Paleo 2.0 bread? That means it does not include any sort of nuts, coconut flour, gums (xanath gum), or sweeteners. I tried one with buckwheat before and it was decent, but not great. Has anyone had success with ingredients like buckwheat or brown rice (keep in mind that soaking and sourdough fermentation reduces a lot of their toxic properties)? Is it even possible to make a decent raised bread without gluten?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:32 AM

Here's a more reputable source, where they were testing on real live celiacs (eek!) apparently the gluten does get digested by the bacteria, or at least changed enough to be rendered non-damaging and not affect intestinal permeability or bloodwork after 60 days. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975578 "selected lactobacilli and fungal proteases, routinely used in bakeries, degraded gluten to <10 ppm during sourdough fermentation."

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:29 AM

Here's a more reputable source, apparently the gluten does get digested or at least changed enough to be rendered less damaging-- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975578 "selected lactobacilli and fungal proteases, routinely used in bakeries, degraded gluten to <10 ppm during sourdough fermentation."

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:23 AM

I don't know how reputable the sources, but I have heard the "gluten is digested by fermentation" theory bandied around WAPF stuff, and in a few cookbooks.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:59 AM

I've NEVER heard from a reputable source that gluten is consumed in the fermentation process. Lactose, sure. Gluten? Proteins don't disappear.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:58 AM

It's higher protein content you need to shoot for in GF bread, yes. If you want a GF cheat, the Gluten Free Doctor has a great blog and she teaches you how to do this. I've had her sourdough - it's great - mine (was, sniff) better.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:56 AM

Brazilian cheese breads ROCK. They're also known as pão de queijo. SO FREAKING TASTY. Major starch bomb, but once in a while, such a lovely textural departure from meat 'n veg. They're very easy to make at home.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:54 AM

I've made fabulous gluten free yeast bread - even sourdough - before. Stuff that gluten eaters happily chow. It's possible. Paleo to your specs? Not sure.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 24, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Pretty much all grains have gluten-like proteins.

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5 Answers

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 24, 2012
at 09:58 PM

I disagree with your entire premise of so called "paleo 2.0".

... However, having said that, you can make rice flour rise. Buckwheat flour is good for pan breads, but you need to cut it with a flour with a glutinous or gluten-like protein (which rice has in a small amount).

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 24, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Pretty much all grains have gluten-like proteins.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:58 AM

It's higher protein content you need to shoot for in GF bread, yes. If you want a GF cheat, the Gluten Free Doctor has a great blog and she teaches you how to do this. I've had her sourdough - it's great - mine (was, sniff) better.

1
707342e3cb97e0fc088917919a154b8a

on August 24, 2012
at 09:55 PM

Not perfect, but I do like flax bread (www.livefabuLESS.com/minutemuffin), it can be made sweet or savory, but I don't make it often as flax seeds aren't ideal.

The only other gluten free breads that I've enjoyed include dairy-- if that's not an issue for you, I'd highly recommend Brazilian Cheese bread, there are a number of recipes online but I buy mine fresh from a local Brazilian supermarket, or frozen in their freezer section (and then heat and serve). It's the first GF, non-grain (it's made with tapioca flour) that actually tastes like bread (actually, it tastes like pizza dough-- it's insanely good!)

The other option is this one: www.livefabuLESS.com/quickbread-- it's just eggs and cream cheese (again, I know, dairy)-- but if you do dairy, it's a nice option to have. It works great as a hamburger bun, too.

Not a direct answer to your question in the least I realize, but that's all I've got. Hope it helps :)

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:56 AM

Brazilian cheese breads ROCK. They're also known as pão de queijo. SO FREAKING TASTY. Major starch bomb, but once in a while, such a lovely textural departure from meat 'n veg. They're very easy to make at home.

0
16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

on August 25, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Free the Animal "Fat Bread"

I think this would count. I haven't tried it yet but if you're okay with nuts you should be okay with this.

5 eggs (medium to large size)
1 cup raw whole macadamia nuts (made into butter per the instructions)
1 cup coconut butter (nuke 20 seconds to get a smooth butter)
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 rounded teaspoon baking soda

edit: I didn't catch the "sourdough" requirement initially (unless that was added later?). Sorry, this might not fit the bill then.

0
211ce7026d0c78a1d5aa23d2cfcc24dc

on August 25, 2012
at 09:31 PM

My wife just got into this a few weeks ago when she bought her first starter kit. Since then she's made pancakes and waffles from it, but the best thing she's made, by far, is the sourdough bread. I'd put it up against any sourdough I've ever had!

Here's the recipe she's followed: http://www.cheeseslave.com/no-knead-sourdough-bread/

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 24, 2012
at 10:40 PM

This likely won't work for celiacs, but for those with a light to moderate gluten sensitivity, plain ol' wheaty real sourdough is usually tolerated. If you let it sour long enough, most of the gluten gets gobbled up in fermentation...and it rises beautifully.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:29 AM

Here's a more reputable source, apparently the gluten does get digested or at least changed enough to be rendered less damaging-- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975578 "selected lactobacilli and fungal proteases, routinely used in bakeries, degraded gluten to <10 ppm during sourdough fermentation."

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 25, 2012
at 12:59 AM

I've NEVER heard from a reputable source that gluten is consumed in the fermentation process. Lactose, sure. Gluten? Proteins don't disappear.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:32 AM

Here's a more reputable source, where they were testing on real live celiacs (eek!) apparently the gluten does get digested by the bacteria, or at least changed enough to be rendered non-damaging and not affect intestinal permeability or bloodwork after 60 days. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975578 "selected lactobacilli and fungal proteases, routinely used in bakeries, degraded gluten to <10 ppm during sourdough fermentation."

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 25, 2012
at 06:23 AM

I don't know how reputable the sources, but I have heard the "gluten is digested by fermentation" theory bandied around WAPF stuff, and in a few cookbooks.

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