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Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 21, 2012 at 2:45 PM

A local pizza place just put a sign out front that says that they're offering gluten free pizza crust. Does this sound like a good idea or is the glue they're using to hold the dough together probably worse than gluten? Does anybody know what is typically used for this? Thanks

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on January 31, 2013
at 11:40 PM

All the places I've seen that offer a gluten free crust order them pre-made and frozen, and this includes high-quality pizza restaurants that hand-make everything else. I carry no expectations that any restaurant I go to that offers a gluten-free alternative to one of their staples to hand-make those alternatives, regardless of their attention to ingredients otherwise.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on March 31, 2012
at 04:12 PM

I bought oa gluten free pizza for my kid, aiming to reduce and even eliminate his gluten exposure as a preventive measure. That he, he shows no obvious gluten sensitivity, so I was just being experimental with him. He hated the taste. The crust looked like cardboard. I don't eat pizza of any kind so I have no first hand experience.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 22, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Yeah, ground flaxseed! I just whiz them in the blender.

D5a52362ba91628833829a52acf1c227

on March 22, 2012
at 07:04 AM

That sounds good! Is that ground flaxseed or no?

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 05:51 PM

No, we only eat thin crust pizza once-twice per month (again, we can get away with that w/o major effects). It'd just be nice to have a more paleo-friendly alternative and truth be told, I'd like to reward eateries that are sensitive to gluten-free living. If their product is above board, I want to support them.

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on March 21, 2012
at 04:53 PM

I tried a gluten free pizza after one year without anything substantially made/baked from grain flours. I had diarrhea half the next day, which I also didn't have for over a year up to that point.

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 04:20 PM

I have. It'd just be nice to find a quasi-paleo version of a convenient comfort food that I don't have to make myself. I truly do love to cook but there are just times when a bit of convenience would be nice when time is an issue. Oh, well. I'm fortunate enough to be able to go off plan and not pay for it too much as long as I don't go crazy. Thanks for your perspective.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 21, 2012
at 03:32 PM

I wouldn't say it's that much better, but then I don't think it's worse either. If you can get your favourite pizza gluten free then why not? Of course if you can't...

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 03:10 PM

Agreed. I've made some nut-based pizza crusts at home with homemade sauce and they are phenomenal and healthy. Luckily, no one in my family is celiac, so having standard pizza as a treat is not a huge deal for us once in a while. I was just wondering if gluten free pizza is orders of magnitude better than standard. If not, I'll just kick my heels up once in a while and have the real thing. Thanks

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8 Answers

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4
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on March 21, 2012
at 03:01 PM

I wouldn't expect anything other than the usual mix of flours and xanthan gum found in most other gluten-free baked goods. I'd say it's better than a normal crust, because for most people anything is better than gluten once you've got free of it. It'll be a different taste of course, but then different pizzas taste different anyway. Is it a good idea? Well that depends on your view of pizza in general. You can go even more paleo with nut crusts but it's still not going to lead to a well balanced meal. Something you could enjoy from time to time, but add in whatever other ingredients and oils are going on that crust and gluten-free may not be your biggest worry.

Personally I can't say I've really noticed (probably because I don't do it often enough) a difference between gluten-free treats and the regular kind, but other people react a lot more so a gluten-free option is generally a better bet.

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 03:10 PM

Agreed. I've made some nut-based pizza crusts at home with homemade sauce and they are phenomenal and healthy. Luckily, no one in my family is celiac, so having standard pizza as a treat is not a huge deal for us once in a while. I was just wondering if gluten free pizza is orders of magnitude better than standard. If not, I'll just kick my heels up once in a while and have the real thing. Thanks

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 21, 2012
at 03:32 PM

I wouldn't say it's that much better, but then I don't think it's worse either. If you can get your favourite pizza gluten free then why not? Of course if you can't...

best answer

3
8df587b692483f4258961ccd2ebfeafb

on March 21, 2012
at 03:07 PM

I was suckered into that one early on as well. Felt horrible the next few days. Even if it is gluten free, it's going to be loaded with stuff you're not going to want to eat. Damn shame, too. Have you tried making your own pizza? Quite good and rather easy!

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 04:20 PM

I have. It'd just be nice to find a quasi-paleo version of a convenient comfort food that I don't have to make myself. I truly do love to cook but there are just times when a bit of convenience would be nice when time is an issue. Oh, well. I'm fortunate enough to be able to go off plan and not pay for it too much as long as I don't go crazy. Thanks for your perspective.

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on March 21, 2012
at 04:53 PM

I tried a gluten free pizza after one year without anything substantially made/baked from grain flours. I had diarrhea half the next day, which I also didn't have for over a year up to that point.

3
03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on March 22, 2012
at 12:52 PM

The flour could be millet, potato, tapioca, or a mix of those or others. So it won't have gluten, which is a good thing. But you're still looking at refined grains, GMOs, anti-nutrients, etc. Gluten is only the main reason to avoid wheat, not the only one. The oil used will still be a high omega-6 industrial seed oil, likely soybean, and the flours could include soy flour. It'll also have more gum and/or baking powder to help the dough rise; not sure whether that's a bad thing.

So it's "better" in the sense that a punch in the gut is better than a brick to the head, and if you find yourself with a group that's set on pizza, steering them to this place might be your least-bad choice. But you certainly couldn't call it paleo (and that's before discussing what's in the sauce and toppings).

2
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on March 21, 2012
at 04:42 PM

I have yet to eat a gluten free pizza (restaurant only) that didn't wreck my guts, but it's hard to say whether it was a result of excessive FODMAPs or something else to which I had an intolerance (like corn or soy). You might want to talk to the pizza guys and see if they make their own GF crust or buy it commercially. Looking over the ingredient lists, Barkat and Venice Bakery brands are pretty Paleo-friendly (just wouldn't eat them frequently).

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on March 21, 2012
at 05:51 PM

No, we only eat thin crust pizza once-twice per month (again, we can get away with that w/o major effects). It'd just be nice to have a more paleo-friendly alternative and truth be told, I'd like to reward eateries that are sensitive to gluten-free living. If their product is above board, I want to support them.

1
Fb10cf8e5dbac271762e13721181d5dc

(453)

on March 22, 2012
at 03:22 AM

I'm gluten intolerant but apparently I tolerate other grains in small doses, so I do fine with gluten-free substitutes on occasion, and suffer no ill effects. My local options always "do it for me" taste-wise too, so it's not like I get disappointed and crave the wheaty version (sometimes I can't tell the difference, and when I can it just brings something of its own to the table). IMO, it's worth a try if you want an occasional neolithic treat and you think you might tolerate a GF substitute better than the "real" option.

BTW, there's a frozen brand called "against the grain" that I believe only uses tapioca starch-- no grain and the ingredients list is super short. Unfortunately, canola oil is one of the ingredients, but for me, still a better "cheat" option than regular frozen pizza which probably uses canola and then some.

Of course, with something that simple, it might be worth making your own crust, with real fat ;D

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 21, 2012
at 08:23 PM

Try making your own: Grate 1-2 eggplants, then squeeze all the liquid out (can put it in a clean tea towel, and just wring it out). Add one egg, 1/4 c flax seed, 1/4 c almond flour. Optional: 1 Tbsp pesto. Spread out onto a lined baking sheet, bake for 20-35 minutes (depending on thickness), flipping once when it is firm. top and broil! Tastes like real pizza, not like the "meatza", which is good, but come one, it ain't pizza!

My brother said you can do the same recipe but with grated beets- I haven't tried it yet, but I can imagine that it would be very visually appealing!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 22, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Yeah, ground flaxseed! I just whiz them in the blender.

D5a52362ba91628833829a52acf1c227

on March 22, 2012
at 07:04 AM

That sounds good! Is that ground flaxseed or no?

1
E55906cdb6839a23fd740ad85d160cc8

(1159)

on March 21, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Homemade Paleo Pizza All The Way. I used ground Turkey, coconut flour, egg, and spices. Baked it first in the pan then topped and broiled.

0
06bf7b92d77f1ac1d8e3dc9d539d8254

on March 31, 2012
at 03:09 AM

I read through the comments and I really wonder does everyone assume he is getting his gf pizza from a gas station? The possible ingredients listed were a bit insane. I would say use your common sense.. if the restaurant is one that uses high quality ingredients then most likely the gf crust will also be of high quality. I live in an area that has two local pizzerias that make their own crust, using local, organic ingredients when they can. This tells me the pizza crust ingredients will be pretty darn good as well.

What it comes down to is if Pizza Hut started serving gf pizza I would never consider it, but from a local, craft pizza type place? Heck ya.

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on January 31, 2013
at 11:40 PM

All the places I've seen that offer a gluten free crust order them pre-made and frozen, and this includes high-quality pizza restaurants that hand-make everything else. I carry no expectations that any restaurant I go to that offers a gluten-free alternative to one of their staples to hand-make those alternatives, regardless of their attention to ingredients otherwise.

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