3

votes

Even Domino's is jumping in on the gluten free craze!

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 09, 2012 at 1:58 AM

Domino's is now serving a gluten free pizza and the crust contains the following ingredients:

??? What ingredients are in Domino's Gluten Free Crust? Water, Rice Flour, Rice Starch, Potato Starch, Olive Oil, Evaporated Cane Juice, Tapioca Flour, Potato Flour, Fresh Yeast, Avicel, Salt, Calcium Propionate.

I'm actually surprised with some of the ingredients they're using, like olive oil and evaporated cane juice. I figured they would use some vegetable oil and high fructose corn syrup.

Do you think that these main stream changes to gluten free are a positive step in the right direction or is it just another marketing agenda like the fat free campaign in the 80's and 90's, when people just winded up eating more because they believed it was healthier?

Domino's also offers a pretty decent explanation of what gluten is, disease vs intolerance and other useful info.

https://order.dominos.com/en/pages/content/customer-service/glutenfreecrust.jsp

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:33 PM

@ Moonablaze: I completely agree. About a month ago, I had some "gluten-free" pizza from another big chain and basically spent the next 24 hours on or around the toilet. Not fun.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 18, 2012
at 10:23 PM

separate ingredient bins, bake the gluten free pizza on single-use foil pans, prep them in a designated area (Away from where pizzas are tossed or dough is mixed), cut it with a designated gluten-free cutter on a designated gluten-free cutting surface(or let the customer cut it themselves). I've seen all of these in use at local-chain and single-location pizza places and when they are in place, I don't get sick.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on May 17, 2012
at 06:09 PM

How would you guarantee that the gluten-free pizza doesn't come into contact with any wheat in this type of business? I am not trying to offend, just curious.

1ab7ccb9520dddd0777db88e74ca0bed

(870)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:05 AM

My sarcasm tag got stripped out :(

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:38 AM

I don't. They could make a lot more effort, like many other, smaller, pizza places have done successfully.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on May 09, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I wouldn't say that article was "good." The writer sets up a straw-man argument suggesting the only other reason people avoid gluten is for weight loss, which is false. Pizza is not health (or paleo) food, gluten-free Dominos pizza is not for celiacs (they are honest about that), and there are legitimate reasons for non-gluten-sensitive people to avoid eating huge amounts of gluten. There may be a case to be made against Dominos, but this doesn't make it.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on May 09, 2012
at 05:39 PM

I live finding options everywhere so here is what you can order with the Gluten Free Crust and not completely kill yourself. Regular Pizza Sauce has soybean oil but it is fairly far down the list of ingredients so there should only be a little. No to regular cheese yes to Feta or Provologne Cheese. No to pretty much every topping except Onions, Green and Red Peppers, Pineapple and Spinach.

1e8b0544791fa695c718834e7a040642

(388)

on May 09, 2012
at 04:24 PM

I totally get how customer demand works. And Domino's will still benefit because there are plenty of people (18 million I just read) who have a gluten sensitivity, as opposed to Celiac. Not to mention the gluten-free fad folks, who think they're losing weight by eating gluten-free. I'm just sayin': If you're going to do it, do it right! I'm also a bit sensitive to this topic, b/c I'm currently trying to open an actual gluten-free kitchen in SF, and am having trouble getting promoted by the Celiac groups, but they're all over this BS. So it makes me cranky. :\

5cd8441bd01fc10816085bfc092477c4

(925)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:37 PM

yes, at least they are trying to accommodate the pubilc. Brilliant marketing, actually.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:36 PM

I completely agree with you on that point Katie. Hopefully they will realize that this isn't really a helpful product for those who really need GF. I plan to send them an email about that very subject and I hope more people do as well.

E5d4889d675291f020c72e958de1f77b

(646)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:17 PM

I do want to point out that even though they promote it as gluten-free, there are a bunch of caveats in their marketing: they recommend that people with celiac or strong sensitivities do NOT eat it, as they aren't taking any necessary precautions to avoid contamination. It's great that more companies are offering things that are less bad! That is so exciting! (I can still get my occasional Oreo fix in!) But marketing it as "Gluten-free (unless gluten makes you hella sick!)" makes me a bit sad.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:09 PM

Jen -That is so funny! I was just thinking how decent the crust was -but with the sauce and cheese additives -its a no go! Can't they just make a cauliflower crust!?

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:26 PM

A few 'less bad' ingredient switches does not make this a healthy choice. Yes, theres serious cross contamination issues, but the ingredients still arent ones i want to eat. (I know, just don't eat it then! And I sure won't) Check out the soy bean oil in the sauce and modified food starch in the cheese.. Blech:http://cache.dominos.com/express012904/pdf/nutri-gluten-free-crust.pdf

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:23 PM

It's more like veggie pizza where the veggies were sauteed in tallow or lard. Looks good on the surface, but to the specialized consumers the pizza is marketed to (vegetarians), it's useless. CUSTOMER DEMAND (why are we capitalizing that?) is undoubedly coming in part from celiacs and those with gluten sensitivity, and this pizza doesn't meet their needs.

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Evaporated cane juice is just plain old cane suger, BUT...it's a huge step up (imho) from high fructose corn syrup. From a marketing perspective, I think they would have been better off just listing cane sugar as an ingredient. Evaporated cane juice is just too cute by half. Once you get caught being deceptive in one area, it hurts your credibility in every other area.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Yes! I think the trickle down effect into other businesses will be huge.

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:59 PM

No more a "marketing ploy" than veggie pizza. When I was young a veggie pizza was unheard of. Then the vegetarian movement grew, and pizza chains started to offer veggie pizzas in response to the growing CUSTOMER DEMAND for vegetarian food. Now there is a growing demand for gluten free foods, and they are just responding to CUSTOMER DEMAND. A decade from now, this will be just another choice on the menu (would you like thin, regular, or thick crust; regular or gluten free dough?) This is the way it's supposed to work. Companies compete for customers by responding to customer demand.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:51 PM

agree with air_hadoken- I like to eat pizza once in awhile and will be glad to have an order-in option. The non-paleos can get their own pizza and I'll have the gf one to myself ;) Hopefully it tastes decent.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:47 PM

My thoughts too- I like to have pizza once in awhile and am glad to have the option to order one without a stomachache.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on May 09, 2012
at 11:42 AM

Agreed, but I do like that they tried. I understand that it would be a serious hassle to ensure it is gluten free and this is better than nothing.

6eb419cfda42211c966fb2c83e9abd30

(18)

on May 09, 2012
at 11:29 AM

So will your non-paleo friends eat a Gluten free pizza because of you?

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 09, 2012
at 10:58 AM

It's still not health food.

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:30 AM

How can they benefit their shareholders without benefiting their customers? To benefit their shareholders they have to make a profit. To make a profit they have to provide something the customer wants. If the customer wants it, then it's a benefit to the customer.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:13 AM

Gak. Still sugary...and the sauce has a ton of sugar too. Anyway, yeah - marketing.

6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:12 AM

That's so awesome! I know this will be a huge plus for me, because I am a film student and when I help on set on classmates' projects, craft services is always an issue. I usually just eat whatever they have, not wanting to make a fuss, but I'm tired of getting sick. Lol. They usually order pizza because it's cheap and feeds many... so now I have a great option to suggest!

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on May 09, 2012
at 04:25 AM

Also unimpressed. Cross contamination is probably a huge issue, can't see how they could bake a GF pizza in their shop without flour drifting in. So it makes sense that they say not suitable for celiacs, limits their liability.

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on May 09, 2012
at 04:13 AM

I love it when they say "evaporated cane juice" - it almost sounds healthy!

Ba20b502cf02b5513ea8c4bb2740d8cb

(1669)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:48 AM

I know, it's all about marketing. Throw gluten free on a box of cracker jacks and call it a day.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I stated in another recent thread, and stand by the assertion, that pizza is a social food and the inability to eat it is a drag on the gemuetlichkeit of the event at which it is served. I'm fine JERFing when on my own, or having people over, but face the reality that almost all of my friends are non-paleo and don't see anything wrong with pizza for social gatherings.

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19 Answers

13
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:02 AM

Wow, I say good for them!

Not that it makes eating a pizza any healthier (or Paleo for that matter, lol), but for people who are gluten sensivitve I'll bet they really crave a pizza every once in a while. Domino's has put a lot of effort over the last couple of years into improving their food and service. If this is successful, we'll start seeing other big chains offering up gluten-free items on their menu.

Plus, now Miley Cyrus has a place to eat! LOL

5cd8441bd01fc10816085bfc092477c4

(925)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:37 PM

yes, at least they are trying to accommodate the pubilc. Brilliant marketing, actually.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:47 PM

My thoughts too- I like to have pizza once in awhile and am glad to have the option to order one without a stomachache.

10
F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

on May 09, 2012
at 03:31 AM

Not suitable for celiacs = not gluten free in my book. (but then maybe I'm just a whiny celiac)

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on May 09, 2012
at 11:42 AM

Agreed, but I do like that they tried. I understand that it would be a serious hassle to ensure it is gluten free and this is better than nothing.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:38 AM

I don't. They could make a lot more effort, like many other, smaller, pizza places have done successfully.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on May 17, 2012
at 06:09 PM

How would you guarantee that the gluten-free pizza doesn't come into contact with any wheat in this type of business? I am not trying to offend, just curious.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 18, 2012
at 10:23 PM

separate ingredient bins, bake the gluten free pizza on single-use foil pans, prep them in a designated area (Away from where pizzas are tossed or dough is mixed), cut it with a designated gluten-free cutter on a designated gluten-free cutting surface(or let the customer cut it themselves). I've seen all of these in use at local-chain and single-location pizza places and when they are in place, I don't get sick.

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:33 PM

@ Moonablaze: I completely agree. About a month ago, I had some "gluten-free" pizza from another big chain and basically spent the next 24 hours on or around the toilet. Not fun.

7
1e8b0544791fa695c718834e7a040642

(388)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:38 AM

I personally only have a mild gluten sensitivity, and am still annoyed that Domino's pizza isn't safe for celiacs or gluten allergies. Not because I want to eat it, because I'm a food snob and Dominos's is gross, but because it's so clearly a marketing ploy, how they're jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon to benefit their share holders, not their customers.

Not impressed.

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:59 PM

No more a "marketing ploy" than veggie pizza. When I was young a veggie pizza was unheard of. Then the vegetarian movement grew, and pizza chains started to offer veggie pizzas in response to the growing CUSTOMER DEMAND for vegetarian food. Now there is a growing demand for gluten free foods, and they are just responding to CUSTOMER DEMAND. A decade from now, this will be just another choice on the menu (would you like thin, regular, or thick crust; regular or gluten free dough?) This is the way it's supposed to work. Companies compete for customers by responding to customer demand.

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on May 09, 2012
at 04:25 AM

Also unimpressed. Cross contamination is probably a huge issue, can't see how they could bake a GF pizza in their shop without flour drifting in. So it makes sense that they say not suitable for celiacs, limits their liability.

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:30 AM

How can they benefit their shareholders without benefiting their customers? To benefit their shareholders they have to make a profit. To make a profit they have to provide something the customer wants. If the customer wants it, then it's a benefit to the customer.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:23 PM

It's more like veggie pizza where the veggies were sauteed in tallow or lard. Looks good on the surface, but to the specialized consumers the pizza is marketed to (vegetarians), it's useless. CUSTOMER DEMAND (why are we capitalizing that?) is undoubedly coming in part from celiacs and those with gluten sensitivity, and this pizza doesn't meet their needs.

1e8b0544791fa695c718834e7a040642

(388)

on May 09, 2012
at 04:24 PM

I totally get how customer demand works. And Domino's will still benefit because there are plenty of people (18 million I just read) who have a gluten sensitivity, as opposed to Celiac. Not to mention the gluten-free fad folks, who think they're losing weight by eating gluten-free. I'm just sayin': If you're going to do it, do it right! I'm also a bit sensitive to this topic, b/c I'm currently trying to open an actual gluten-free kitchen in SF, and am having trouble getting promoted by the Celiac groups, but they're all over this BS. So it makes me cranky. :\

7
0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:00 AM

I just had one today. I was on a shoot for a documentary and told them I was gluten free, and they got Dominos pizza. Thoughtfully a GF free meat one. I's oky for a treat, but normally I'm grain free.

6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:12 AM

That's so awesome! I know this will be a huge plus for me, because I am a film student and when I help on set on classmates' projects, craft services is always an issue. I usually just eat whatever they have, not wanting to make a fuss, but I'm tired of getting sick. Lol. They usually order pizza because it's cheap and feeds many... so now I have a great option to suggest!

4
16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

on May 09, 2012
at 02:01 PM

Avicel = wood cellulose pulp

Calcium Proponate is linked to headaches, irritability, restlessness, sleep disturbances

Um, yeah I think I'll pass.

Seriously people, how hard is it to eat real food that wasn't made in a factory??

4
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on May 09, 2012
at 01:23 PM

Major corporations are trying to cash in on a section of the population that thinks gluten should be avoided, and I have to admit, that includes me.

I want them to try to get my money by offering foods that are less bad for me.

I follow dr. Harris' earlier suggestion that above all else, gluten should be avoided.

I occasionally have other things, but I am healthier now than I ever have been, and getting more muscular as I go. Do I still have a bit more bodyfat that I'd like? Sure! But it took me decades to build up too high, and I don't expect all of those decades of damage to resolve in under 6-7 years.

Why? I believe I read that it takes 6-7 years for complete cell turnover in the pancreas. Until, all new pancreas cells have been 'born' in the new environment that is me eating oa new way, they change is still undergoing.

(I need to go check the figures for complete cell turnover by major organ... Google, here I come!)

3
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:28 PM

Is it paleo? Not even close. Is it healthy? Nope.

Is this a positive thing? Yes!

Here's why: we do not want paleo/primal/ancestral/whole food eating to be inclusive. We want as many people exposed as possible. This is not some cool club, where only the informed get to be in the know. You have to start somewhere.

Not everyone is so committed to eating healthy. They want to, but they choose to focus their life on other things besides diet, like family, work, etc.

Having more options at fast food chains is great. Maybe this will be a door for many SAD eaters to start looking at their food differently.

I know for me, when I first starting eating healthy, it seemed a bit overwhelming. The longer I did it, the easier it became. When I look back now at the food I was eating... well, let's just say was not even close to being healthy. The point is that it's a learning process.

2
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:51 PM

As a strict GF person, I think this is a great thing. There are several local restaurants that are amazing in their understanding of GF and their service to their GF customers. There are others that are pretty (well-meaning but) clueless. Then there are the handful that really make it seem like you are a burden. Obviously I don't patronize the last group, but I could really use some help with the middle group. I'm lucky that MA requires all restaurants to have training in food allergies so at least they understand what the issue is, but when they see that Dominoes (or any other national chain) is promoting GF food, that's when the lightbulbs start going off "Oh, there must actually be profit in this. There must be a lot more people who eat GF than we realize. Maybe we should stat promoting a few GF menu items." You don't have to eat Dominoes to benefit from this.

E5d4889d675291f020c72e958de1f77b

(646)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:17 PM

I do want to point out that even though they promote it as gluten-free, there are a bunch of caveats in their marketing: they recommend that people with celiac or strong sensitivities do NOT eat it, as they aren't taking any necessary precautions to avoid contamination. It's great that more companies are offering things that are less bad! That is so exciting! (I can still get my occasional Oreo fix in!) But marketing it as "Gluten-free (unless gluten makes you hella sick!)" makes me a bit sad.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:36 PM

I completely agree with you on that point Katie. Hopefully they will realize that this isn't really a helpful product for those who really need GF. I plan to send them an email about that very subject and I hope more people do as well.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Yes! I think the trickle down effect into other businesses will be huge.

2
1ab7ccb9520dddd0777db88e74ca0bed

on May 09, 2012
at 02:15 AM

Yes! Now I can eat a healthy pizza!

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 09, 2012
at 10:58 AM

It's still not health food.

1ab7ccb9520dddd0777db88e74ca0bed

(870)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:05 AM

My sarcasm tag got stripped out :(

1
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on May 09, 2012
at 07:51 PM

When the low-carb craze caught on in such a big way, corporations started noticing, and offering low-carb options on regular menus. This turned out to be helpful for lots of other people who weren't specifically on low-carb diets, paleo folks, for one, who could find meals of meat and veg, without starch/sugar, and without having to make nuisances of themselves (perhaps in social situations) asking for lots of substitutions, etc.

I wonder if gluten-free pizza, et al., will have a similar impact, in that it will at least introduce and mainstream the notion that wheat = bad (or problematic, at least) to a lot of people. And those people might demand more of the same--and done better--and maybe that will help us all. Kind of a "rising tide lifts all boats" thing, maybe?

1
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on May 09, 2012
at 06:08 PM

The cynic in me says that Domino's is simply appealing to the same group of people who would have said f0ck1t and eaten a SAD pizza anyways. Now they can have an easier time justifying this junk :)

I applaud that they at least clearly state this pizza is not suitable for anyone with celiac, etc.

1
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on May 09, 2012
at 05:38 PM

I applaud Domino's for going the GF route. I don't care if it's now trendy - trendy can be a good thing when suddenly it's easier to eat with the rest of the general public!

1
4886d3390cb1de913ecc198e72cc072c

on May 09, 2012
at 04:24 PM

As a celiac I wouldn't never chance eating their "so called" GF pizza. Their disclaimer states that the pizza is not save for people with Celiac Disease. Good blog article about this subject here: http://www.spinningspoons.com/2012/05/why-gluten-free-pizza-at-dominos-does.html

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on May 09, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I wouldn't say that article was "good." The writer sets up a straw-man argument suggesting the only other reason people avoid gluten is for weight loss, which is false. Pizza is not health (or paleo) food, gluten-free Dominos pizza is not for celiacs (they are honest about that), and there are legitimate reasons for non-gluten-sensitive people to avoid eating huge amounts of gluten. There may be a case to be made against Dominos, but this doesn't make it.

1
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:20 PM

I'm excited about this for my kids. We eat pretty strict Paleo at home but they are allowed to make their own choices when at school or eating with friends. Having a better option as they grow up is fabulous. Think about all the times kids and kids' groups like school/church/scouts/sports teams/band etc. order a pizza as a treat for the kids. Now they can be more inclusive of the kids who eat a little differently and those kids don't have to feel as different. They can be part of the group. I am very encouraged by this and applaud Dominos for making an effort and doing the best they can at this time.

1
6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on May 09, 2012
at 07:09 AM

I'm mildly impressed... because even though there's marketing and what-not involved, and the prospect of regaining profit lost from people who now eat gluten-free and have ditched pizza... I can't help but wonder about cross-contamination. If all of the dough is getting rolled out on the same slabs, and getting baked in the same ovens, etc... then is it really gluten-free?

But kudos to them for at least making an effort, which is more than I can say for a lot of other mainstream restaurants out there. Lol.

1
6eb419cfda42211c966fb2c83e9abd30

on May 09, 2012
at 03:01 AM

Is there really a need for an 'every now and then' paleo/primal food though? FFS eat quality whole foods and boom. Pizza, smizza. Mah......

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on May 09, 2012
at 01:51 PM

agree with air_hadoken- I like to eat pizza once in awhile and will be glad to have an order-in option. The non-paleos can get their own pizza and I'll have the gf one to myself ;) Hopefully it tastes decent.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on May 09, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I stated in another recent thread, and stand by the assertion, that pizza is a social food and the inability to eat it is a drag on the gemuetlichkeit of the event at which it is served. I'm fine JERFing when on my own, or having people over, but face the reality that almost all of my friends are non-paleo and don't see anything wrong with pizza for social gatherings.

6eb419cfda42211c966fb2c83e9abd30

(18)

on May 09, 2012
at 11:29 AM

So will your non-paleo friends eat a Gluten free pizza because of you?

1
1955b5516a3eaedce732f4ea8bb3fa6c

on May 09, 2012
at 02:41 AM

I was a little leery when I first heard about this but seeing the ingredient list, I think it's pretty cool! I would not be against ordering this sometime as a treat on a night I didn't feel like cooking. Though, I don't know about the quality of everything else that goes on there (cheese, meats, veggies, sauce). It is cool of them to list the ingredients for everything they serve on a PDF-->(here). The cheese has soybean oil in it and doesn't sound so great, but for a treat I might let it slide Who knows, maybe one day I'll be able to order a grass-fed meatza to be delivered to me. :)

1
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:16 AM

I saw this earlier today when their app showed up with this update. I'll know this weekend how this tastes. :)

0
7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on September 30, 2012
at 02:47 PM

I'm kind of retarded. When I must eat out with friends, I tend to get really friendly with the waiter/waitress and overreact about my reaction to gluten so that it's ABSOLUTELY clear. There's a lot of drama on my end, but I used to end up sick all the time when I'd just say "gluten free, please" so now I'm super nice, super dramatic, and hopefully they do their job when I go out. Because salads are just plain boring after eating out with celiac every week!

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