2

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Is this post-prandial bg something to be concerned about?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 11, 2011 at 4:36 PM

I am petite -- 5'3" and 107 pounds. My fasting glucose was 82. Breakfast was 2 organic black instant coffees; 3 pastured eggs from the farmer's market (soft-boiled with salt, paprika and pepper); 3 jalapeno stuffed organic olives and 1 small organic plum. It's 2 hours later and my blood glucose is 104. I generally test before meals (usually only eat twice a day) and don't eat until my glucose is back down to fasting. My rule is to try to always keep post-prandial spikes under 115 or 120 a la Dr. Su. I could do Bernstein's under 100 at all times but I think it's unnecessarily restrictive. My breakfast was relatively very low calorie for me and I've eaten much more at a meal but without the fruit -- say -- 3 eggs plus steamed veggies plus lots of macadamia nuts -- much more calorically dense than what I had this morning and my glucose does not spike as high. Should I be concerned? I remain a bit confused as to whether it's really necessary to keep all post-prandials under 100 or if 120 is ok too.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on August 22, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Care to share that research? http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/07/cell-lipotoxicity-in-pathogenesis-of.html Elevated free fatty acids will deplete your beta cells.http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/01/deleterious-effects-of-nefa-ii.html related:

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on August 12, 2011
at 07:47 PM

Er, there's actually research claiming 110 will start depleting your beta cells. There are those with serious problems with neuropathy who were never diagnosed with diabetes based on FBG, A1C or OGTT.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 12, 2011
at 12:24 PM

don't get confused with the difference between "acute" and "chronic." BS is supposed to rise after eating, then insulin is supposed to release. We've developed these abilities for a reason. Cortisol is similar when it's released from exercise. It is only chronically raised levels of these hormones that is wholly unhealthy and evidence that one is metabolically damaged.

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4 Answers

1
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on August 12, 2011
at 12:10 PM

Ned Kock posted on normal pp blood glucose levels.
http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/05/blood-glucose-variations-in-normal.html

Glycation doesn't kick in until sustained BG's over 180.

Don't worry, eat happy.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on August 12, 2011
at 07:47 PM

Er, there's actually research claiming 110 will start depleting your beta cells. There are those with serious problems with neuropathy who were never diagnosed with diabetes based on FBG, A1C or OGTT.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on August 22, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Care to share that research? http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/07/cell-lipotoxicity-in-pathogenesis-of.html Elevated free fatty acids will deplete your beta cells.http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/01/deleterious-effects-of-nefa-ii.html related:

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on August 11, 2011
at 09:28 PM

Dr Davis (of Track Your Plaque fame) recommends under 100 postprandial BG levels. But you need to decide what works for you. Me, I'd probably stick with the 120. I like Yoni Freedhoff's recommendation here: live the life you can love, not the life you can tolerate.

1
F3fc2e0a9577e7e481a387d917904d1e

(1070)

on August 11, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Not at all. Check out Chris Kresser's blog post here:

http://thehealthyskeptic.org/when-your-???normal???-blood-sugar-isn???t-normal-part-2

He lists ideal fasting BG as <86 and 2-hour PPBG as <120

0
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on August 12, 2011
at 07:51 PM

There is no endo or internist that will be concerned about your post-prandial number. However, you need to keep in mind that the path to insulin resistance is different for men and women. For men it's the FBG. For women, it's post-prandial readings. Your 104 2 hour post isn't high, although ideally it should be at your fasting level. I would keep tracking post-prandial readings after your biggest meal daily (the one above isn't your biggest meal so it isn't representative) and see what the pattern is. Does it fall to fasting at 2h, 3h? Your only carb source is the plum, but depending on whether you've eaten anything before, something else could be hitting the meter.

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