1

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Glucose vs fat for exercise, your opinion. (Reworded)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 20, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Both glucose and fat rely on similar enzyme systems towards the end of ATP conversion, but the conversion of glucose starts with glycolysis, fat via beta-oxidation.

Lactic acid is a by-product of glycolysis and is a preferred fuel source for other organs (heart, liver, kidneys, slow-twitch muscle), but also causes muscle "burning" unless your a maximal exercise.

On the other hand your body has A LOT more fat hanging out than glucose, which is essentially a never ending source of energy for extended exercise. But then no lactic acid.

What kind of exercise do YOU engage in and how do YOU prefer to fuel that exercise?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Care to expand?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 20, 2012
at 07:18 PM

keto adapted and fat adapted are different things

Efd28623add25421afa2884b466163c4

(163)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Ethanol is faster still. There are more things to efficiency than speed.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:18 PM

2500 calories of glycogen supports 4 hours of full contact football. For something more paleo like hunt-and-gather activity - falling trees/splitting wood, canoeing/kayaking, scrambling up scree to get berries - it would probably support twice that. Fat metabolism kicks in underneath, but for an active paleo lifestyle glycogen metabolism works the best.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:16 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:16 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they help tremendously with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:08 PM

This is where I sit too, no carb loading or anything like that.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:07 PM

This confuses me. You're saying including fat when you carb load messes with your glycogen reserves? Does it mess with the amount you can store or the efficiency in which you can access it?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I have read it, but it's at home.. rereading it tonight.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:00 PM

I have read it, but it's at home.. definitely rereading it tonight.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:00 PM

Efficient to store is the bodies ability to take as many calories as it's being supplied and to store it. The body has vast storage capability for fat so it can take a lot of calories and store them as fat. Efficient storage is calories/gram. Fat is 9 KC/g, Protein and Glucose is about 4 KC/g. Technically Alcohol is about 7 KC/g but I've seen conflicting reports on the BA of alcohol, so I leave it as more "undetermined"

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:59 PM

I have read that book, but it's at home and this question was burning a hole in my brain..

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:56 PM

All true, but glycolysis can produce energy faster.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

What is your difference between "Efficient TO store" and "Efficient storage"?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

You're right, totally chose the wrong word.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

You're right, totally chose the wrong word. What is your difference between "Efficient TO store" and "Efficient storage"?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:00 PM

ok. CS, that is not a definition of efficiency in any way. Efficiency is work/time: So efficient to convert? -- Alcohol, Glucose, Protein, Fat. Efficient to store? -- Glucose, Fat, Protein. Efficient storage: Fat, Protein, Glucose, Alcohol. Your question is what provides more energy, not efficiency. Glucose provides more maximal energy, but has fewer stores available. Fat provides more stable energy and has vast storage throughout the body.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:54 PM

I'd like know how the PH community differs in fuel preferences.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Efficient for me means being able to store and burn glucose if I feel like doing a 100 mile bike ride, but fasting the next day because I forgot to pack my lunch.

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7 Answers

4
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Define efficient? obviously glucose is easier and more efficient for your body to burn. That's why it prefers it over fat\ ketones. But how would you even choose? The body burns what it can, when it can to meet it's demands. I do not think you can control that.

Personally, I prefer to be fat adapted which, for me, means routinely working out at the end of IF while keeping my total carbs low to ensure the body is as efficient as possible with burning fat. But before a race? I down a banana and some coconut water, lots of carbs there.

For me it's like training with a weight vest. Once you take it off you feel like you can fly.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

You're right, totally chose the wrong word. What is your difference between "Efficient TO store" and "Efficient storage"?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:54 PM

I'd like know how the PH community differs in fuel preferences.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:00 PM

ok. CS, that is not a definition of efficiency in any way. Efficiency is work/time: So efficient to convert? -- Alcohol, Glucose, Protein, Fat. Efficient to store? -- Glucose, Fat, Protein. Efficient storage: Fat, Protein, Glucose, Alcohol. Your question is what provides more energy, not efficiency. Glucose provides more maximal energy, but has fewer stores available. Fat provides more stable energy and has vast storage throughout the body.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

You're right, totally chose the wrong word.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:00 PM

Efficient to store is the bodies ability to take as many calories as it's being supplied and to store it. The body has vast storage capability for fat so it can take a lot of calories and store them as fat. Efficient storage is calories/gram. Fat is 9 KC/g, Protein and Glucose is about 4 KC/g. Technically Alcohol is about 7 KC/g but I've seen conflicting reports on the BA of alcohol, so I leave it as more "undetermined"

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

What is your difference between "Efficient TO store" and "Efficient storage"?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Efficient for me means being able to store and burn glucose if I feel like doing a 100 mile bike ride, but fasting the next day because I forgot to pack my lunch.

2
C326acd0ae246a39c5685f2ba72e3136

on September 20, 2012
at 04:58 PM

Fat is definitely a better fuel source! Before a workout I used to need tons of carbs and sugary foods, not anymore! A few pieces of fruit or a sweet potato does just fine, I feel like I'm using a mixture of fat/glucose for fuel.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:08 PM

This is where I sit too, no carb loading or anything like that.

2
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Carboloading doesn't need any fat. It jacks your glycogen reserves for improved performance in the following 12-24 hours. So I'd say starch first.

Nothing wrong mixing fat with the carbs though....chocolate milk is the standard....

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:07 PM

This confuses me. You're saying including fat when you carb load messes with your glycogen reserves? Does it mess with the amount you can store or the efficiency in which you can access it?

2
05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

on September 20, 2012
at 04:50 PM

As the other to said, fat, definitely longer burning more stable fuel source. And when you are keto adapted even better. being an efficient fat burner how do you think you will do better on a longer workout?

Using your glycogen stores? which is what 2500 calories max? vs your potential fat stores which could but what? 20,000+ calories of energy. hmm... I prefer the fat personally.

Glucose is more of an anaerobic fuel, I guess if your sprinting or something... But I think you can get away with fat too.

Read this book The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I have read it, but it's at home.. rereading it tonight.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:59 PM

I have read that book, but it's at home and this question was burning a hole in my brain..

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:00 PM

I have read it, but it's at home.. definitely rereading it tonight.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:18 PM

2500 calories of glycogen supports 4 hours of full contact football. For something more paleo like hunt-and-gather activity - falling trees/splitting wood, canoeing/kayaking, scrambling up scree to get berries - it would probably support twice that. Fat metabolism kicks in underneath, but for an active paleo lifestyle glycogen metabolism works the best.

1
B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I think it depends on the kind of workout you do. I eat way less carbs that I used to and perform most of my workouts on fat stores (or a pre-workout hard boiled egg). That being said, most of my workouts are short (Crossfit and interval endurance training). For longer workouts (which rarely happen outside of endurance races), I do hit the carbs usually in the form of a well-rounded breakfast including some sweet potato and my own Paleo sports drinks and gels (aka coconut water/pinapple juice/salt and baby food packets). This mostly helps stave off exhaustion in my brain. I've been to the point of wanting to DNF and taking in one little baby food packet totally gives me the mind to keep plugging away.

I just want to say that I feel better operating this way. I used to have blood sugar crashes in the middle of Spin classes or personal training sessions that no longer happen.

1
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 20, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Glucose is needed for prolonged high intensity output. Glycogen loading the muscles post workout better prepares you for the NEXT day. When someone is very fat-adapted, they can go hour DAYS at a lower intensity, but you will hit a threshold if you up the intensity too much. I have tried training strictly fat adapted and would "boink" at certain points if I upped the intensity too much. Carb loading from good sources (sweet potato, etc.) the previous day post workout did wonders for me.

As a side note: adding in BCAA's pre and post workout made a noticeable difference.

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:16 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they help tremendously with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:16 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. and while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I've played with BCAA's as well.. while they don't provide any energy they deff help with recovery.

1
Efd28623add25421afa2884b466163c4

(163)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:44 PM

Fat, any way you look at it. Less ROS produced, less oxygen burned, giant fuel reserves. However, keep in mind it takes time to learn to burn fat efficiently. You have to be fully keto-adapted. And the body prefers to burn glucose first probably because it can't store large amounts of it.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 20, 2012
at 07:18 PM

keto adapted and fat adapted are different things

Efd28623add25421afa2884b466163c4

(163)

on September 20, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Ethanol is faster still. There are more things to efficiency than speed.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:56 PM

All true, but glycolysis can produce energy faster.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Care to expand?

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