2

votes

What type of gloves should I cook with

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2012 at 3:01 AM

When working in the kitchen I find that wearing gloves helps a lot. It keeps my skin from drying out, allowing me to wash my hands more often. I'm more willing to dig my hands into messy food without having to worry about cleaning out my fingernails. They protect me from minor cuts and scratches. They insulate against heat a bit.

I started out by using disposable Vinyl power free gloves from the supermarket. They're nice but a bit expensive so I'm looking for some on Amazon that are cheaper. What do you all suggest?

Is Vinyl a good option or is another type healthier? I try not to touch hot food with them but they do touch cold to warm food. Other common varieties seem to include Nitrile and Latex, neither of which I'm allergic to. They mention that they're good for medical and baby care and household chores but not food handling. Should I be concerned about that omission or is it just a lack of market? Most on Amazon seem to mention the same thing.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on June 10, 2013
at 03:46 PM

I'm curious. What did it say?

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:34 PM

A pharmacist told me any would be ok as long as the food wasn't hot but I don't have a high opinion of them. I try not to reuse gloves but mostly because it's gross and the moisture trapped inside can ruin your skin as well. Yeah it's pretty useful with cold things.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:33 PM

Thanks for the +1s. I bought some of those flimsy plastic ones but they stink - water gets in and you can't feel anything through them. Ok for putting together a sandwich, not so much for chopping onions. Will attach bounty when I can if no direct answer to question appears.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:31 PM

Actually, I feel the food pretty well through the gloves. I was worried about that too.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 04:39 PM

So true! I love eating with my hands but don't like handling the food while I cook. It's all the hand washing and drying. I know chefs just wear an apron and wipe on it instead of washing. I'd need an apron for each meal and then have the extra laundry. The gloves seem easier but considering the cost...I may rethink it.

Df7cf48be85c91165f9f39f1fe462e41

on January 07, 2012
at 04:15 AM

I also +1, as I feel it's a good question. That being said, Costco & Sams club carry boxes of food handler gloves. They are made of just clear flimsy plastic, like what you would see someone at a restaurant or catering business wearing. I believe the boxes have @400-500 gloves each and are cheap and disposable.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 03:43 AM

+1 to offset mystery down-vote.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on January 07, 2012
at 03:11 AM

Maybe look for a catering equipment supplier for the gloves?

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6 Answers

3
4d6aa1a676240b15dc569ff8ade0500f

(2546)

on January 07, 2012
at 04:25 PM

i love feeling the food in my hands. i couldn't imagine cooking with gloves! funny how different we all are, even with the most inconsequential things...

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:31 PM

Actually, I feel the food pretty well through the gloves. I was worried about that too.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 04:39 PM

So true! I love eating with my hands but don't like handling the food while I cook. It's all the hand washing and drying. I know chefs just wear an apron and wipe on it instead of washing. I'd need an apron for each meal and then have the extra laundry. The gloves seem easier but considering the cost...I may rethink it.

0
C16aed2d83525d4d1d560fa67b579702

on January 08, 2012
at 12:24 PM

I think it is definitely a bad idea to use gloves more than once. Regarding the types of gloves used, as the kitchen manager at a hotel, we go through lots of gloves which I buy. Lately I have been buying the powder free vinyl gloves at GFS, which is a store that caters to restaurants and people that are cooking for large parties, etc. They cost $5 for 100 gloves. Latex are fine as well, but they are more expensive, and in general cooks aren't wearing gloves for hours at a time, rather only for a few minutes and then they are thrown away so it makes more sense to buy the cheaper gloves. For us I feel that the powder free vinyl do the job. Plus with the latex gloves,when your hands are kind of damp from frequent handwashing the latex becomes harder to put on because of the 'stretchy-ness' Also make sure the gloves fit well, you don't want to be cutting and get pieces of glove in your food from the gloves being too baggy and the fingers too long.

Also regarding the kevlar cutting gloves, in a restaurant you would wear a glove underneath the cutting glove, then another over top to keep the cutting glove clean because it is not practical to wash it often, if at all. I'm not sure how you would do it. I've never tried running them through the dishwasher or washing machine but my suspicion is they might not hold up too well.

And lastly the comment about chefs simply wiping their hands on their apron, this is a huge no-no. No chef should be doing that. Doesn't matter whether you are dealing with raw meat or vegetables, any of them could be contaminated with harmful bacteria and you want to minimize any chance of cross contamination.

0
A942dbc90fe12f7f90744a68f9f223e2

(249)

on January 08, 2012
at 08:59 AM

You could use cut resistant gloves that are made specifically to protect your hands when cutting, slicing, grating food. They are woven gloves made of fibers such as kevlar. While they both protect and insulate your hands, they are not waterproof. These are not your disposable variety of gloves. An example would be Victorinox Cutlery PerformanceShield Cut Resistant Glove

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 03:13 PM

I use the blue exam gloves from Sam's club (Members Mark, latex/powder free) and they are a little studier than the ones from Costco. I can get 2-3 uses out of them before they break. I hadn't considered the "healthier" aspect of what they are made of, just figured keeping my hand germs out of the food I handle would be a plus especially when I'm processing a big batch of meat for the freezer.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:34 PM

A pharmacist told me any would be ok as long as the food wasn't hot but I don't have a high opinion of them. I try not to reuse gloves but mostly because it's gross and the moisture trapped inside can ruin your skin as well. Yeah it's pretty useful with cold things.

0
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 07, 2012
at 03:49 AM

Do you want to contribute to this kind of industry? http://www.mindfully.org/Plastic/Dioxin-Factories-USA.htm I dunno. I still buy plastic, I'm not perfect, but I think we ought to try to cut out what we can. Why not invest in spatulas that you love to use, work on your knife skills and your knife edges so that your hands are safe, invest in a couple of potholders that actually make you feel safe hauling a casserole out of the oven, a sturdy nail brush, and give your skin some TLC at night?

-1
934c76d962b785a7ba56da99bfeb4594

on June 05, 2013
at 11:43 AM

weird spam .

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on June 10, 2013
at 03:46 PM

I'm curious. What did it say?

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