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Ginger cuts malondialdehyde to 1/6th and raises testosterone by 150%?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 18, 2013 at 2:47 AM

Are there any non sulfurous substances that drop malondialdehyde or raise testosterone by such significant margins that you are aware of? Are these observed effects a result of the anti-inflammatory properties of ginger. Might turmeric have similar effects?

Source:http://www.ergo-log.com/gingertest.html

4cef120270c742b7f0094b05c617636f

(181)

on July 23, 2013
at 12:06 PM

I'm willing to give the onion thing a go but I wonder how much onion juice I'd have to consume

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 21, 2013
at 03:51 PM

What are your personal testosterone levels? I do know that eating high quality red meat boosts testosterone

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on July 18, 2013
at 02:01 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16117603 , http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leo-galland-md/how-to-fight-inflammation_b_849387.html , http://www.nyrnaturalnews.com/herbal-remedies/2013/06/ginger-increases-insulin-sensitivity-in-type-2-diabetics/ , http://www.naturalnews.com/040970_ginger_diabetes_insulin_resistance.html , http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09637486.2013.775223 .

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:59 PM

There are studies in humans showing that ginger lowers inflammation and increases insulin sensitivity though.

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:59 PM

Yea, I found another study showing a doubling of testosterone (from either Africa or somewhere in Europe) from ginger, but it was in diabetic mice, and it only brought their testosterone up to the level in the otherwise healthy controls. http://www.ergo-log.com/gingerdoublest.html

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 18, 2013
at 12:02 PM

Hate to say it, but science out of certain areas of the world is very suspect. I've not found Iranian science to be all that reproducible.

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2 Answers

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Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on July 20, 2013
at 01:49 AM

This is a very interesting question. It seems that ginger works to raise testosterone possibly by increasing the surface distribution of the protein GLUT4, ultimately leading to what could possibly be bigger muscle mass, improved insulin sensitivity and better metabolic fitness in general. +1. I'm not aware of any other non-sulfurous foodstuffs that have similar effects. Onions might work via similar mechanisms, which would support the correlation between the ergolog you posted and the ergolog that shows onion juice tripling testosterone in rats.

Here: http://medinfo2.psu.ac.th/qa/document/SAR/SAR%2053/evidence/5/5-4/6.pdf

and

Here: http://www.ergo-log.com/onionjuice.html

4cef120270c742b7f0094b05c617636f

(181)

on July 23, 2013
at 12:06 PM

I'm willing to give the onion thing a go but I wonder how much onion juice I'd have to consume

0
8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on July 24, 2013
at 01:01 PM

http://paleohacks.com/questions/179294/ginger-increases-testosterone-levels-and-improves-sperm-quality-what-other-spice#axzz2ZtyR1MRR

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878731

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23874764

You can find tons of substances which decrease malondialdehyde (sodium butyrate does not contain sulfur) and increase testosterone (parsley, fenugreek) as the above PH link and papers show, but why focus on just these two compounds? As Happy Now answered in the PH link, why not just focus on being overall healthy? and getting everything in proper balance?

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