0

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What do you think about DNA ancestry services?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 10, 2010 at 10:07 PM

Someone sent me a link to this https://www.23andme.com/ancestry/origins/ -- looks interesting.

Map your global origins with the most complete coverage of your DNA. 23andMe Ancestry Edition ($399) also includes:

  • Your Relative Finder: Find people who share DNA with you.
  • Your Ancestral Lineages: Mitochondrial and Y-DNA.

Questions for those of you in the know.

1) Are these services legit?

1a) Any others out there like this?

2) What can it tell me that I don't already know?

3) If anything, is it worth it?

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on November 12, 2010
at 07:26 PM

The all-knowing US government (FDA) is considering regulating these and other genetic tests. They are afraid people will use this knowledge in ways the medical establishment does not approve.

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 08:48 AM

That's only true for familytree, not for 23andme, which checks ancestry on autosomal. familytree also does this for an extra fee

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 11, 2010
at 12:04 AM

All mothers pass on their mitochondrial DNA to their kids. Therefore, whatever they say is your mitochondrial lineage really traces you back to your Maternal Ur-Mother (mother's mother's mother's mother's etc.). All fathers pass on their Y-DNA to their sons in the Y-chromosome, which is unchanged enough that it can be matched to your father's father's father's father's (etc.) if you are a man (and ergo have the Y-chromosome). So while you ARE learning something of your ancestral origins, you are learning about the teeniest tiniest percentage of the total contribution to your gene pool.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 11, 2010
at 12:04 AM

All mothers pass on their mitochondrial DNA to their kids. Therefore, whatever they say is your mitochondrial lineage really traces you back to your Maternal Ur-Mother (mother's mother's mother's mother's etc.). All father's pass on their Y-DNA to their sons in the Y-chromosome, which is unchanged enough that it can be matched to your father's father's father's father's (etc.) if you are a man (and ergo have the Y-chromosome). So while you ARE learning something of your ancestral origins, you are learning about the teeniest tiniest percentage of the total contribution to your gene pool.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:04 PM

Something similar came up once before. I think all these outfits offer multiple levels of services, for additional fees, of course: http://paleohacks.com/questions/5520/haplogroup-research#axzz14vJr8tST

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:00 PM

I wonder how far back they can go. We're all African I thought.

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5 Answers

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 11, 2010
at 05:36 AM

I don't know about the human ones, but the ones for dogs are notoriously unreliable. One lady had a champion purebred pitbull but its DNA test came back as being mostly border collie! LOL!

1
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:59 PM

I have used Family Tree DNA services mostly for genealogical tracing and find them legit, reliable, etc.

http://www.familytreedna.com/

It is up to you to decide whether it's worth it. I did it because my sister is a genealogist and I am the only male sibling, and the Y chromosome carries paternal DNA. I discovered I'm a member of haplogroup Q1b which is very unusual for your average whitebread Jew; Q1b are typically North American natives or Siberians, not people from central Europe. So it can lead to interesting results. Apparently I'm more closely related to Genghis Khan than Moishe Cohen...

If you are considering testing for specific disease markers, I can't help you and neither can FTDNA.

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on November 26, 2010
at 01:17 AM

I wouldn't use the info for anything other than idle curiousity/play. I don't think it's quite there yet in terms of quality. That said, there's coupons for Black Friday that cut the price to $99 + $60 (for a year's subscription). Substantially cheaper if you get it in time. Check twitter for 23andme to see various coupons.

0
D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 08:51 AM

If you've got the bucks, it's worth it. If you do 23andme get the health also. that is their forte

don't buy anything without consulting first with someone

your motivations in testing are unclear. what do you want to find out?

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:32 AM

The short answer is wait a few years. The price will fall and you can get a full genome sequencing.
If you want to do it now, 23andme is the best bang for the buck.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on November 12, 2010
at 07:26 PM

The all-knowing US government (FDA) is considering regulating these and other genetic tests. They are afraid people will use this knowledge in ways the medical establishment does not approve.

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