10

votes

23andme actionable findings

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 02, 2012 at 10:41 AM

Have you extracted any actionable, effective and yet counter-intuitive (to conventional wisdom and general paleo knowledge) conclusions from 23andme or other genetic testing companies?

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 28, 2012
at 02:46 AM

I also found out I am homozygous for a mutation in the enzyme that reduces CoQ10 to ubiquinol (the active form). This mutation confers nondetectable enzymatic activity. It's rs1800566 if anyone is interested. This is important to know, and anyone with this mutation would want to supplement with ubiquinol and NOT with CoQ10.

415ce5b8f88f4d762fa946f9f43d94b6

(564)

on August 16, 2012
at 11:18 PM

You might want to get your Ferritin levels checked. Definitely take your hemochromatosis results to your doctor when you ask for the blood work. You may be absorbing and storing excess iron (bound up as Ferritin) even if your hemoglobin levels are low.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 14, 2012
at 02:38 PM

Sigrid, I think you're better of knowing, than in suffering for years and having no idea why, with doctors treating you like you're crazy.

21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on August 13, 2012
at 10:55 PM

I've just run my 23andme data through Promethease and it says that I am carrier of a rare metabolic disorder (Tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency) that impacts ability to metabolize certain proteins.Yikes! Maybe I should have left that can of worms unopened. No symptoms (yet), luckily.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Brad, check out http://snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1799963 aka prothrombin F2. On 23andMe, if you go to the venous thromboembolism report, it should be on there to say whether you have it or not. From what I understand, Factor V is worse than Factor 2, but neither are good. If you also have a MTHFR mutation, it makes your risk even higher, because you're likely to build up homocysteine.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:36 PM

I've gotten some benefit out of Promethease and snpedia, but I'm still unable to get some of the information I need.

E8bf28bd28f5be7c34d4a1a97e7c1353

(253)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:30 PM

How did you find out about the leiden II mutation? I possibly have Leiden Factor V but I cant find where the data is or if they even test it.

Aacabe21bcb2c8a5a15717d60447c1f4

(144)

on August 13, 2012
at 01:32 PM

Can you elaborate for someone interested in genetics and with an understanding of most molecular bio techniques? What are they doing wrong?

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:03 PM

To follow up: I increased my carbs to about a potato or two a day, and have been feeling much better, more satisfied and more balanced that way. I also noticed that I have a very high risk for venous thromboembolism, and as such, decided to stop supplementing with vitamin K for the time being, until I learn more about my risk factors and the pathways involved.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on February 27, 2012
at 03:08 PM

I completely see the rationale behind not procreating if your potential offspring are more likely than not to lead a difficult life because of the genes they end up with. Sure, the couple may decide they're up for the challenge, but it's not like you can ask your potential kid ahead of time if they're okay living a life that, say, requires them to always be dependent on someone else for example.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:35 PM

I don't believe people choose to fall in love, let alone choose with whom to fall in love, which is more about projection of archetypal fantasies whose "task" it is to convince us that "Finally, he/she is truly the one!" It makes sense to me that a prospective child-conceiving couple might want to know something about their likelihood of giving birth to a kid with serious genetic problems of a potentially lethal nature. Being "in love" at the start is a poor measure of whether a couple would be up for the challenges of that. I realize this sounds clinical, because it is.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:43 PM

Rose, I don't think we choose who we fall in love with based on whether they are carriers for certain diseases or not.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Sara, I don't think Dorado was suggesting not procreating. The sentence in question says "you may want to avoid procreating with another human *who is likewise a carrier.* Big difference.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:25 AM

I think the point of this question is seeing what information genetic testing has revealed to people, such as whether it gave them a key to a health puzzle, or led to some other insight (like maybe high fat low carb isn't the way to go). ... As for procreation, the decision is entirely a person's whether they want to procreate or not. I personally think it's helpful to know what risk factors one might have, but it seems strange to me to tell someone else they may not want to procreate.

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

There are a few SNP's that genetically code for malfunctions in MTHFR. Do a MTHFR search at snpedia.com and you will get a list of the SNP's to search for in your genome.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:03 AM

Definition #2 here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/actionable

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 15, 2012
at 09:19 PM

Hey Neuroleptic -Where do I find that MTHFR result on my 23andme Results?

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on February 15, 2012
at 08:31 PM

I'd upvote this twice if I could. Not just a good answer to this question, but great advice in general.

4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

(646)

on February 15, 2012
at 05:21 PM

FWIW, I am not a slow metabolizer of caffeine, yet I don't tolerate it well at all and avoid it.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 15, 2012
at 04:35 AM

I also have the Pro12Ala variant in the PPARG gene, for which a diet high in monounsaturated fat is not protective against increased waist circumference.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:16 PM

MTHFR defective here, too. I take a Multi and try to eat more foliage. No mental health issues besides overthinking my diet.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:13 PM

Same here. I had already figure out by experience that caffeine after 11am is a bad idea for me. I cold-turkey'd for a few weeks, but it didn't seem to make life all that much better.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 03, 2012
at 06:00 PM

I sort of wish this one had been expressed, just so every doctor I see would quite having a fit when they see my blood results. haha!

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on February 02, 2012
at 10:19 PM

I came here to say something similar to this...having the genes doesn't mean much, it's the epigenetics (expression of the genes) that matters. And having a non-inflammatory, non-autoimmune diet prevents a lot of the bad things from ever being expressed.

A3e654929c08c0723607842656b57f8f

(834)

on February 02, 2012
at 05:15 PM

I am the same on this.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 02, 2012
at 05:10 PM

I found out the same thing and I still have my morning coffee.

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:23 PM

I read up a great deal on the folate/methionine/homecysteine cycles and had just sent for a 23andme kit (should arrive tommorrow) in the hopes of ensuring those critical things are going around and around the right ways. The material on it is fascinating.

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:03 PM

I also have the defective MTHFR! My doctor independently discovered this doing tests when I got pregnant 8 months ago, and put me on an extra special folate supplement. Very interesting about the mental health connection...

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Thanks for the answer, already read a bit of Emily Deans stuff :) You should take a look at the gaps book it's quite interesting in relation to mental health in general, and therefore applicable to almost everyone as it seems we all have our quirks just at different levels.

Bbceb114ed2332c22490e324d991497e

(705)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:12 PM

I have very little knowledge about GAPS, unfortunately. I would give the blog of Dr Emily Deans a look at though. I can't say that there has been substantial improvement in my mental health since I started the paleo diet. I haven't been on it very long compared to the amount of time I've had my disease, though. My guess is that if you start the diet before the disease progresses significantly it could offer substantial help. Once the disease progresses past a certain point I feel the diet could still help, but it definitely wouldn't be a substitute to conventional treatment.

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Hi Neuroleptic, great to hear that you are improving by dieting. Has your improvement been significant compared to conventional medicine? Are you using GAPS? The reason i am asking is that i have a family member who seems stuck in the conventional schizophrenia treadmill. I really want to help him in some way, do you know if there are any good resources on dieting in relation to schizophrenia besides "Gut and Psychology syndrome". Many many Thanks in advance!

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Hi Neuroleptic, great to hear that you are improving by dieting. May i ask you have improved? Are you using GAPS? The reason i am asking is that i have a family member who seems stuck in the conventional schizophrenia treadmill. I really want to help him in some way, do you know if there are any good resources on dieting in relation to schizophrenia besides "Gut and Psychology syndrome". Many Thanks in advance!

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on February 02, 2012
at 01:18 PM

I found out the same thing! I don't drink coffee, soda, or any other caffeine-laced beverages so it's not a problem, but it was good to know anyway.

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9 Answers

8
Medium avatar

on February 15, 2012
at 08:24 PM

You probably are not looking for grounds upon which to sue 23andme, but...

The word "actionable" means "affording grounds for legal action" and "violating principles of justice."

I get that you mean something closer to: "Based on one's genome, what behaviors should one adopt."

One thought. If your genetic tests reveal you are a carrier for genes related to, say, cystic fibrosis, you may want to avoid procreating with another human who is likewise a carrier, because two parents with that gene create a far greater chance of producing a child with cystic fibrosis.

Otherwise, the main fact remains: Genetic testing reveals risk percentage. Follow a low inflammation lifestyle, eat real food and work up a sweat several times per week. Do what you love.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:03 AM

Definition #2 here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/actionable

Medium avatar

(8239)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:35 PM

I don't believe people choose to fall in love, let alone choose with whom to fall in love, which is more about projection of archetypal fantasies whose "task" it is to convince us that "Finally, he/she is truly the one!" It makes sense to me that a prospective child-conceiving couple might want to know something about their likelihood of giving birth to a kid with serious genetic problems of a potentially lethal nature. Being "in love" at the start is a poor measure of whether a couple would be up for the challenges of that. I realize this sounds clinical, because it is.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:43 PM

Rose, I don't think we choose who we fall in love with based on whether they are carriers for certain diseases or not.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on February 15, 2012
at 08:31 PM

I'd upvote this twice if I could. Not just a good answer to this question, but great advice in general.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Sara, I don't think Dorado was suggesting not procreating. The sentence in question says "you may want to avoid procreating with another human *who is likewise a carrier.* Big difference.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:25 AM

I think the point of this question is seeing what information genetic testing has revealed to people, such as whether it gave them a key to a health puzzle, or led to some other insight (like maybe high fat low carb isn't the way to go). ... As for procreation, the decision is entirely a person's whether they want to procreate or not. I personally think it's helpful to know what risk factors one might have, but it seems strange to me to tell someone else they may not want to procreate.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on February 27, 2012
at 03:08 PM

I completely see the rationale behind not procreating if your potential offspring are more likely than not to lead a difficult life because of the genes they end up with. Sure, the couple may decide they're up for the challenge, but it's not like you can ask your potential kid ahead of time if they're okay living a life that, say, requires them to always be dependent on someone else for example.

7
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on February 02, 2012
at 01:08 PM

I found out I'm supposedly a "slow metabolizer" of caffeine from 23andme (and so is my father) which means it might increase my risk for heart disease and that generally I don't tolerate it so well. I love coffee, but have known for years that it's problematic for me, so now instead of trying to live with it and drink it for its various purported health benefits, I am careful about avoiding it or carefully controlling the amounts I allow.

A3e654929c08c0723607842656b57f8f

(834)

on February 02, 2012
at 05:15 PM

I am the same on this.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on February 02, 2012
at 01:18 PM

I found out the same thing! I don't drink coffee, soda, or any other caffeine-laced beverages so it's not a problem, but it was good to know anyway.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 02, 2012
at 05:10 PM

I found out the same thing and I still have my morning coffee.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:13 PM

Same here. I had already figure out by experience that caffeine after 11am is a bad idea for me. I cold-turkey'd for a few weeks, but it didn't seem to make life all that much better.

4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

(646)

on February 15, 2012
at 05:21 PM

FWIW, I am not a slow metabolizer of caffeine, yet I don't tolerate it well at all and avoid it.

6
Bbceb114ed2332c22490e324d991497e

on February 02, 2012
at 01:55 PM

I found out that I am homozygous for the defective form of the MTHFR enzyme, meaning that my body is a very poor metabolizer of folate. I've read some studies that have linked this to mental health issues. I've had schizophrenia since I was 13. Most mental health professionals give very little focus to diet in the treatment of mental illness. I wonder how well I would have responded to diet changes when I was 13 instead of riding the psychiatric medication merry-go-round.

I am not criticizing mental health professioanals by any means because there is very little research into the relationship between diet and mental health. Still, it would be nice if I didn't have to deal with the side effects of the medications I've been on.

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Hi Neuroleptic, great to hear that you are improving by dieting. May i ask you have improved? Are you using GAPS? The reason i am asking is that i have a family member who seems stuck in the conventional schizophrenia treadmill. I really want to help him in some way, do you know if there are any good resources on dieting in relation to schizophrenia besides "Gut and Psychology syndrome". Many Thanks in advance!

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:23 PM

I read up a great deal on the folate/methionine/homecysteine cycles and had just sent for a 23andme kit (should arrive tommorrow) in the hopes of ensuring those critical things are going around and around the right ways. The material on it is fascinating.

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Hi Neuroleptic, great to hear that you are improving by dieting. Has your improvement been significant compared to conventional medicine? Are you using GAPS? The reason i am asking is that i have a family member who seems stuck in the conventional schizophrenia treadmill. I really want to help him in some way, do you know if there are any good resources on dieting in relation to schizophrenia besides "Gut and Psychology syndrome". Many many Thanks in advance!

Bbceb114ed2332c22490e324d991497e

(705)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:12 PM

I have very little knowledge about GAPS, unfortunately. I would give the blog of Dr Emily Deans a look at though. I can't say that there has been substantial improvement in my mental health since I started the paleo diet. I haven't been on it very long compared to the amount of time I've had my disease, though. My guess is that if you start the diet before the disease progresses significantly it could offer substantial help. Once the disease progresses past a certain point I feel the diet could still help, but it definitely wouldn't be a substitute to conventional treatment.

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:03 PM

I also have the defective MTHFR! My doctor independently discovered this doing tests when I got pregnant 8 months ago, and put me on an extra special folate supplement. Very interesting about the mental health connection...

A783764adde241a3d1a91e27808d6106

(65)

on February 02, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Thanks for the answer, already read a bit of Emily Deans stuff :) You should take a look at the gaps book it's quite interesting in relation to mental health in general, and therefore applicable to almost everyone as it seems we all have our quirks just at different levels.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:16 PM

MTHFR defective here, too. I take a Multi and try to eat more foliage. No mental health issues besides overthinking my diet.

3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

(2392)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

There are a few SNP's that genetically code for malfunctions in MTHFR. Do a MTHFR search at snpedia.com and you will get a list of the SNP's to search for in your genome.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 15, 2012
at 09:19 PM

Hey Neuroleptic -Where do I find that MTHFR result on my 23andme Results?

3
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 02, 2012
at 05:12 PM

I found out I have the genes for "hemochromatosis".

Yet I have been severely anemic my whole life.

I guess those genes just haven't been expressed.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on February 02, 2012
at 10:19 PM

I came here to say something similar to this...having the genes doesn't mean much, it's the epigenetics (expression of the genes) that matters. And having a non-inflammatory, non-autoimmune diet prevents a lot of the bad things from ever being expressed.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 03, 2012
at 06:00 PM

I sort of wish this one had been expressed, just so every doctor I see would quite having a fit when they see my blood results. haha!

415ce5b8f88f4d762fa946f9f43d94b6

(564)

on August 16, 2012
at 11:18 PM

You might want to get your Ferritin levels checked. Definitely take your hemochromatosis results to your doctor when you ask for the blood work. You may be absorbing and storing excess iron (bound up as Ferritin) even if your hemoglobin levels are low.

3
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on February 02, 2012
at 02:35 PM

I have found out that I'm a little bit more neanderthal than John Durant ;). I also supposedly have a low risk of obesity (as if). So for me, not so much in the area of actionable findings (yet).

1
E8bf28bd28f5be7c34d4a1a97e7c1353

(253)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:31 PM

I highly recommend checking out Promethease: http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Promethease

It takes your raw 23andme data and gives you much more info with useful suggestions.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:36 PM

I've gotten some benefit out of Promethease and snpedia, but I'm still unable to get some of the information I need.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 14, 2012
at 02:38 PM

Sigrid, I think you're better of knowing, than in suffering for years and having no idea why, with doctors treating you like you're crazy.

21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on August 13, 2012
at 10:55 PM

I've just run my 23andme data through Promethease and it says that I am carrier of a rare metabolic disorder (Tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency) that impacts ability to metabolize certain proteins.Yikes! Maybe I should have left that can of worms unopened. No symptoms (yet), luckily.

1
0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on February 15, 2012
at 05:23 AM

I don't know, I work a lot in the field of breast cancer, and I know that the BRCA tests on the 23andme or similar home genetics test are not done with proper scientific process (this is per the oncologists I work with). So I probably wouldn't trust these results in general much.

Aacabe21bcb2c8a5a15717d60447c1f4

(144)

on August 13, 2012
at 01:32 PM

Can you elaborate for someone interested in genetics and with an understanding of most molecular bio techniques? What are they doing wrong?

1
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 15, 2012
at 03:33 AM

Woah, I just got my results and there's one that has me stumped. It seems I may respond poorly to high levels of saturated fat in my diet. Does anyone else have this in their report (for the APOA2 gene)?

http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs5082(C;C)

I'm not quite sure what to make of this. I guess I'll try a lower-fat diet for a while and see if I notice any fat loss? I haven't been losing weight on paleo, so maybe that's why?

Edited to add: Actually, 23andMe has turned out to be super important. Despite a gluten free diet for over a year, I'm still suffering symptoms from celiac disease, especially mood, energy, and mental problems. I found out I am heterozygous for a MTHFR mutation, as well as homozygous for a COMT mutation. Taking folate, methylcobalamin, and SAM-e has been very helpful. I also have a Leiden factor II mutation, which further complicates homocysteine blood clotting problems. It continues to be a scavenger hunt to piece things together, but the SNP analysis has been invaluable.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on February 15, 2012
at 04:35 AM

I also have the Pro12Ala variant in the PPARG gene, for which a diet high in monounsaturated fat is not protective against increased waist circumference.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:03 PM

To follow up: I increased my carbs to about a potato or two a day, and have been feeling much better, more satisfied and more balanced that way. I also noticed that I have a very high risk for venous thromboembolism, and as such, decided to stop supplementing with vitamin K for the time being, until I learn more about my risk factors and the pathways involved.

E8bf28bd28f5be7c34d4a1a97e7c1353

(253)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:30 PM

How did you find out about the leiden II mutation? I possibly have Leiden Factor V but I cant find where the data is or if they even test it.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 13, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Brad, check out http://snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1799963 aka prothrombin F2. On 23andMe, if you go to the venous thromboembolism report, it should be on there to say whether you have it or not. From what I understand, Factor V is worse than Factor 2, but neither are good. If you also have a MTHFR mutation, it makes your risk even higher, because you're likely to build up homocysteine.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 28, 2012
at 02:46 AM

I also found out I am homozygous for a mutation in the enzyme that reduces CoQ10 to ubiquinol (the active form). This mutation confers nondetectable enzymatic activity. It's rs1800566 if anyone is interested. This is important to know, and anyone with this mutation would want to supplement with ubiquinol and NOT with CoQ10.

0
D3f3b91d1dd9ce60865654faeb2ec809

on February 21, 2012
at 06:45 AM

The only information I found relevant to my diet is that I have a genetic predisposition towards lactose intolerance. I emphasize 'predisposition' because they mention that certain environmental factors can affect this. Sadly, they don't list them or refer to any clinical studies though.

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