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How powerful could gelatin be in the treatment of multiple sclerosis?

Answered on October 22, 2018
Created October 22, 2012 at 5:54 PM

How powerful could gelatin be in the treatment of multiple sclerosis?

{My aunt is dying and it is very hard on the family due to the degree of deterioration. It would be a miracle if there were any improvement at all.}

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 23, 2012
at 03:35 AM

I had a squashed major nerve once in my arm, and b-vits seemed to be what helped me there (it had to grow back from the base). Seeing as you excrete what you dont need, I think a diet with lots of meat would be a good idea.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 23, 2012
at 03:33 AM

Really agree with all the thoughts here: anti-inflammatory diet/protocol, vits and minerals for nerve growth (including a raft of b vits from meats), vitamin d supplement, and cannabis for symptom releif. Actually a good amount of omega's, like from cod liver oil or fatty fish, seems like a really good idea re the inflammatory angle too. And dont completely avoid omega-6 either, even if it is mostly pro-inflammatory, they are endocannibinoid precursors (but normal amounts in grassfed meat should be sufficient)

9dd74d3941535d0aaa2c8d3cf454fb7e

on October 23, 2012
at 12:59 AM

Look for diet rich in substances that promote nerve myelination, e.g. magnesium, B12, folic acid, etc.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on October 22, 2012
at 07:26 PM

I have an educated guess, but I thought it best to withhold it at first, lest I get my own idea regurgitated back at me.

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4 Answers

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 23, 2012
at 01:20 AM

Gelatin is not magic I'm afraid. It's good healthy food, but not magic.

MS is an inflammatory process, so an overall anti-inflammatory diet would likely be helpful. A good ratio of fats should be helpful (since myelin is made up of a good portion of fat).

Vitamin D, as Dragonfly noted, is probably important (certainly explains the correlation between latitude and MS rate).

Not a dietary suggestion, but medicinal cannabis might be something worth trying.

3
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on October 22, 2012
at 09:42 PM

High doses of D3 may give her a reprieve, but it could be too late at this point... (more likely to help than gelatin, IMO)

http://blog.vitamindcouncil.org/2012/10/20/vitamin-d-and-multiple-sclerosis-implications-for-assessment-and-treatment/

"A Cochrane review in 2010 was only able to identify one intervention study that was suitable for analysis. It included 25 participants that received 40,000 IU of vitamin D per day for 28 weeks followed by 10,000 IU per day for 12 weeks. The progression of their disease was significantly reduced, but relapse rates were not. It is worth noting that despite the mean 25(OH)D level of 165 ng/mL that was achieved in the study, no symptoms of hypercalcemia were reported.

Another long-noted association exists between MS and osteoporosis. It is well established that as disability from MS progresses, bone mineral density (BMD) decreases. This is likely not due to the decreased mobility seen in more advanced cases of MS because newly diagnosed individuals have been found to have significantly lower BMD values than average. The authors note vitamin D plays an indisputable role in bone health and MS patients should thus supplement with vitamin D if their 25(OH)D level is low.

When all of the intervention studies are considered, the authors note it is plausible that vitamin D supplementation plays a role in reducing the progression of MS as well as relapse rates. Because MS patients frequently suffer from early onset osteoporosis and vitamin D supplementation has a well-established safety profile, the authors recommend supplementation to achieve blood levels up to 50 ng/mL. Furthermore, the authors mention that UVB radiation may affect the immune system and thus sun exposure may have benefits for MS independent of vitamin D.

These results dovetail nicely with the Vitamin D Council???s recommendation to maintain 25(OH)D levels around 50 ng/mL. The conflicting results of the intervention trials may be partially explained by the hypothesis that vitamin D is a risk factor for MS starting in utero. By the time MS has taken hold, it may be too late in some individuals to reverse the course of the disease through vitamin D supplementation."

3
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on October 22, 2012
at 06:50 PM

What hypothesis are you proposing. Do you have any ideas of a mechanism or are you just picking random paleo ideas and see what sticks?

Terry Wahls has a very good description (though probably more specific than it needs to be) of using a paleo-esque diet to reverse MS.

http://www.terrywahls.com/

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on October 22, 2012
at 07:26 PM

I have an educated guess, but I thought it best to withhold it at first, lest I get my own idea regurgitated back at me.

0
Daba41d7436b9dd49372baaf630c480a

(0)

on October 22, 2018
at 03:57 PM

The main amino acid constituent of gelatin is glycine. Glycine has been found to increase macrophage activity which causes demyelination.

Google PMID20623529 for the article reference.

Two supplements for MS support that you may want to look into are biotin and taurine.

 

 

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