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How do people eat gelatin from broth and why?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 07, 2011 at 2:14 PM

Hi all I am struggling to find a good way to eat gelatin. We've only pastured flesh foods and have a lot of gelatin when cooked foods cool. I find an aversion to gelatin for some reason and look for 'the push' to eat it, but hopefully people have ideas as to 1) how my family will benefit and 2) how to make it more appealing. Thanks all.

Cd2d1fcf77345c9b2889ab56ecf5c842

(250)

on September 08, 2011
at 07:41 PM

I just made a huge pot of bone broth from 6 pounds of marrow bones that I bought from a local ranch. I have about 8 quarts of the stuff! It's kind of bland as is, But today I used two cups of bone broth to deglaze the pan after I cooked some hamburger patties. This gave it a LOT more flavor! Then I threw in a few leftover cooked veggies (today it was caramelized onions and a few beet greens) and I had myself a nice yummy bowl of very healthy soup.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:33 PM

Nice! Do you have A/C? We don't, so we don't do ANY inside cooking if we can help it!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:08 PM

Hey, I'm in Laughlin, NV, which has about the same temperatures as Death Valley. I start the slow cooker early in the morning and turn it off by noon or 1 pm before peak heat. I pour the broth into a plastic bowl, then set that bowl into a larger one with ice. Once cool, I refrigerate it and do the same things again at least once more.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Hey, I'm in Laughlin, NV which is about as hot as Death Valley. I still use the old slow cooker to make bone broth. I start early in the morning, sit the bowl into a larger bowl with ice then refrigerate. I usually do this for two or three days to get a nice fully cooked broth.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on September 07, 2011
at 08:17 PM

Gelatin doesn't separate out; it makes the stock "gel". Are you by any chance talking about the white stuff that solidifies on top when the stock cools? If so, that's fat, not gelatin. You can skim it off and cook with it or feed it to animals.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on September 07, 2011
at 03:49 PM

When warm, you can drink it like soup.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2011
at 02:40 PM

When I make broth, it's full of gelatin--sets up like jello in the fridge. When I reheat it, though, it's just a rich broth so I'm not sure I understand your question. If you find the taste blah, one trick is to pour some broth in your pan after removing cooked meat/veggies. Keep the heat on, which boils your broth down to a gravy or sauce; the remaining liquid blends with the fat in the pan and flavorings from the meat/veggies. Pour the sauce over the meat and veggies and you have a sumptuous meal.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on September 07, 2011
at 02:28 PM

It's great for the joints. If only I would be able to make bone broth...

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4 Answers

2
3f11b5fda91063846bba45daac3541bd

(1186)

on September 07, 2011
at 02:55 PM

Gelatin improves the efficiency of digestion and is healing to the gut lining. It's beneficial if there are any digestive problems or allergies in your family.

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 07, 2011
at 04:11 PM

It's too hot to make bone broth here, so I get Great Lakes gelatin powder and make a low-sugar version of jello with sucrose. (I have fructose malabsorption and this works better for me than fruit.)

Maybe you could add it to smoothies? I add gelatin to a kefir smoothie sometimes.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Hey, I'm in Laughlin, NV which is about as hot as Death Valley. I still use the old slow cooker to make bone broth. I start early in the morning, sit the bowl into a larger bowl with ice then refrigerate. I usually do this for two or three days to get a nice fully cooked broth.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:33 PM

Nice! Do you have A/C? We don't, so we don't do ANY inside cooking if we can help it!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2011
at 11:08 PM

Hey, I'm in Laughlin, NV, which has about the same temperatures as Death Valley. I start the slow cooker early in the morning and turn it off by noon or 1 pm before peak heat. I pour the broth into a plastic bowl, then set that bowl into a larger one with ice. Once cool, I refrigerate it and do the same things again at least once more.

1
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on September 07, 2011
at 03:47 PM

i put my immersion blender in the pot and let 'er rip. i don't even notice the gelatin even when its refridgerated. as Nance said, it makes the broth extra rich.

0
Cd2d1fcf77345c9b2889ab56ecf5c842

(250)

on September 07, 2011
at 05:56 PM

I am making a batch of bone broth right now in my 6-quart Crockpot. It's going to be 100 degrees outside later today so I would not want to be boiling a pot on the stove. But the Crockpot doesn't heat the house up. I leave it on low heat for about 24 hours. I just drink it warm from a mug. I don't think I would want to eat it cold!

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