1

votes

Gelatin: Who wants Pork Pudding?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 29, 2011 at 10:22 PM

Last weekend, I bought my first whole shoulder of pastured pork, and did my own butchery to make many meal sized cuts from it. Hooray!

The first thing I cooked down was all the bones that were in the shoulder with all the meat and cartilage that were hard to remove. The next day, all that lovely 'close tot he bone' meat had come off and I pulled the bones out. I ran all the meat, fat and liquid through a blender and placed it back in the crockpot with spices to become a smooth pork stew/soup.

I added some beef gelatin to the soup to thicken it, but I surprised myself with how well it worked. Too Well, in fact.

I now have a tub of ummm Pork Pudding. The gelatin from the bones + the gelatin powder conspired to set-solid the entire portion I set back for another day. It is the color of cooked pork w/ green flecks from the peppers. I think it is DELICIOUS, and super satifying... but not so great to look at...

So, want some?

The second meal from it was pulled pork (mexican spicy) made over night in a crock pot and it was wonderful and a bit more like what I have already been making.

How can I dress this up to serve to others, or is it just good for Paleo peoples and other adventurous eaters???

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 28, 2011
at 05:47 PM

You could always melt it down and then make an aspic with it. You already know that it'll set well! :-)

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 28, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Paleo equivalent of a kegger? +1! :-)

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 30, 2011
at 08:07 PM

I have a half a human brain jello mold... And come to think of it the pork soup is almost the right color grey!!!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 30, 2011
at 04:53 AM

http://joannasfood.blogspot.com/2008/12/jellied-stock-good-enough-to-eat-on-its.html

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 30, 2011
at 02:15 AM

Ironically, the french restaurant I worked at (my favorite place I worked at) never served amuse bouches.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 30, 2011
at 02:13 AM

noooo...an amuse bouche is a very silly thing you get at fancy restaurants as a pre-appetizer. A "free" course from the kitchen thats supposed to whet your appetite. It's not something that you order. To slip someone pork gelatin under the guise of being an amuse bouche is pretty funny to me, but i think that's just cuz ive worked in restaurants for so long... Then again, things DO sound better in French.

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 30, 2011
at 12:55 AM

or this one! http://ediblecrafts.craftgossip.com/files/2010/10/heartjello.jpg

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 30, 2011
at 12:07 AM

Give anything a French name, and it suddenly becomes a delicacy. Eh, tartare? ;)

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:49 PM

it turns to yummy soup or sauce when warm. I was trying to find ways to serve it solid for something different. The extra gelatin makes it super smooooooth!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:38 PM

I like this idea very much. +1

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:38 PM

lol! call it an amuse bouche! love it!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Mailing would work better in the winter!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:35 PM

It is a delicious soup when warmed!

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

10 Answers

best answer

4
1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Cube it, serve it in a large spoon with a spring of whatever herb you think would best complement it. Call it an amuse bouche. If they like it, put a blob on the plate and let them have at it.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 30, 2011
at 02:15 AM

Ironically, the french restaurant I worked at (my favorite place I worked at) never served amuse bouches.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:38 PM

lol! call it an amuse bouche! love it!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:38 PM

I like this idea very much. +1

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 30, 2011
at 12:07 AM

Give anything a French name, and it suddenly becomes a delicacy. Eh, tartare? ;)

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 30, 2011
at 02:13 AM

noooo...an amuse bouche is a very silly thing you get at fancy restaurants as a pre-appetizer. A "free" course from the kitchen thats supposed to whet your appetite. It's not something that you order. To slip someone pork gelatin under the guise of being an amuse bouche is pretty funny to me, but i think that's just cuz ive worked in restaurants for so long... Then again, things DO sound better in French.

2
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on July 28, 2011
at 03:14 PM

Drunken pig shooters? Warm, add vodka (cause vodka really does go with everything), chill in a pan, cut it up into nice bite sized cubes of giggly pork goodness.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 28, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Paleo equivalent of a kegger? +1! :-)

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 28, 2011
at 03:00 PM

My mother used to make pig's feet, which involves removing the hair from the trotters and cooking them for a long time either in the oven or braising, then taking the bone scraps out. With all of the small bones and connective tissue, the result is pork gelatin with small pieces of extremely tender meat... similar to what you describe, and totally delicious. She served it in small bowls like Jell-O, at room temperature it was nearly solid, when chilled it was very firm.

I haven't had this for probably 30 years, but would love to have a batch of it now...

1
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 30, 2011
at 04:51 AM

If you can get good quality pork, you can get trotters sometimes next to nothing. Then you can cook them to what Fergus Henderson calls "trotter gear" :) Here pork is very badly raised and even organic usually includes grain feeding, so i never buy pork, or chicken.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 30, 2011
at 04:53 AM

http://joannasfood.blogspot.com/2008/12/jellied-stock-good-enough-to-eat-on-its.html

1
95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 30, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Invest in a pig shaped jello mold? "Great for animal lovers - suprise them with a jelly in the shape of their favourite animal." In your case, it would also be made of said animal!

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 30, 2011
at 12:55 AM

or this one! http://ediblecrafts.craftgossip.com/files/2010/10/heartjello.jpg

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 30, 2011
at 08:07 PM

I have a half a human brain jello mold... And come to think of it the pork soup is almost the right color grey!!!

1
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:39 PM

I'm sure you could portion it and freeze it, if it melts when reheated there are tons of uses for it.

1
Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Dude... mail me some. That sounds awesome.

All I can think of is to add something with a lot of lipase in it to digest the gelatin and bring the water out of suspension. Can't think of any foods that do off the top of my head, so you might have to tap your duodenum for some juice.

EDIT with a practical solution:

Heat or a competing solute could help precipitate the gelatin. Add salt and boil it? Not sure if it'll work.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Mailing would work better in the winter!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:49 PM

it turns to yummy soup or sauce when warm. I was trying to find ways to serve it solid for something different. The extra gelatin makes it super smooooooth!

1
Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on April 29, 2011
at 10:25 PM

What temperature is it a solid at? I haven't ever used beef gelatin, but I often have meat jello in the fridge after a nice crock-pot recipe. It liquifies into deliciousness after just a few seconds in the microwave.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:35 PM

It is a delicious soup when warmed!

0
618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on September 08, 2013
at 08:51 PM

Add some bits of pork meat back into it, cook it with a little more gelatin, then place it in a loaf pan lined with wax paper to firm up. When you take it out of the pan, slice it and serve it with chopped onions, parsley, and a squeeze of lemon. Sort of like head cheese, but better!

0
4693b7fa33de10a0f93d81e490ee24a4

on September 08, 2013
at 03:39 PM

this is a dish still made in Europe, called 'aspic' in France , 'kocsonya' in Hungary, 'piftie' in Romania. Google these words and you'll see beautiful pictures. You can add herbs or sliced vegetable in it, just before the jelly is set and make it look more " gourmet". I'm from Transylvania (now a part of Romania) and we still male this dish and call it 'racituri'.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!