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Declared/Undeclared Sulphites in Gelatine (or Why Ignorance is Bliss)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 15, 2011 at 5:24 PM

I've recently started trying to include more gelatine in my diet after becoming interested in the benefits of restricting methionine/balancing amino acids. Bone broths seemed the most Paleo way to do this (and have other benefits too) but it feels increasingly impractical for various reasons, and I also have been put off by discovering that broths contain free glutamate e.g. the "unnatural" form of MSG which acts as an excitotoxin.

Anyway, what it boils down to (heh) is that I ended up buying some powdered gelatine, but I've only now noticed a new allergy advice label warning that it contains sulphur dioxide. I got in touch with the company, and apparently all powdered gelatines use sulphur dioxide as a "processing aid", although "as the residual level is greater than 10 parts per million (but less than 50 parts per million) we must now declare this on the label to comply with the latest EU allergen labelling legislation." This leads me to believe that before the legislation was tightened up, I must have been consuming sulphites anyway without realising in dried fruits, wine e.t.c. I can't help but wonder at how this compares with what levels sulphites must be declared in USA, Canada, Australia e.t.c.

I couldn't find any specific information on sulphur dioxide, although it seems that sulphites are only dangerous to the 1% of the population with a sulphite allergy.

Considering this, my questions are:

Is there any specific reason (apart from the general Paleo philosophy towards processed foods) to avoid sulphites if you are not allergic? By specific reasons, I don't mean people making insinuating observations about acid rain.

Is there any difference between naturally-ocurring sulphites which are present in many other Paleo foods e.g. celery and the sort which are used as processing aids e.g. wine, dried fruit?

Between 10-50 ppm seems like a trace level of sulphites to me. Could this be like the difference between being a person who is ordinarily gluten intolerant and someone who is an uber-sensitive coelic with a hair-trigger allergic reaction? However could regularly consuming suphites, even at such low levels, be detrimental?

Finally, could the benefits of regular gelatine consumption outweigh any potential/indefinite/hypothetical detrimental effects of sulphites?

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 15, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Are sulphur and sulphites/sulphur dioxide the same thing? I'm a little confused.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 15, 2011
at 10:08 PM

Assuming that you're US-based, I wouldn't have expected there to have been any warning labels - they are there due to stricter EU legislation. You make some good points, but the stock is actually a bit of a red herring here. I only included it as background information so that people wouldn't simply recommend that I try making my own as a source of gelatine. I'm interested in sulphites.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on April 15, 2011
at 09:20 PM

I went and checked my Knox Unflavored Gelatin Ingredients: Gelatin. Warnings : 0. Still recommend the Stock over processed Gelatin.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on April 15, 2011
at 09:19 PM

any large bone with a quantity of Marrow in it. Yes, you can get marrow from virtually any bone. Ruminant preferred.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on April 15, 2011
at 06:10 PM

side question if you dont mind, what are marrow bones specifically? So if I ask for some how would I ask...and oh, I'm allergic to beef so are there marrow bones for chicken, pork (lamb I'm a little iffy on, maybe a new allergy)....

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1 Answers

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on April 15, 2011
at 05:30 PM

Ive made huge batches of grassfed beef bone stock in the crockpot, it lasts quite a while and required me to drop water and bones in the crockpot, walk away for 24+hours and return and strain it. Really easy.

Sulfur is in real foods, and with the exception of allergies, I have yet to find serious reasons to avoid trace amounts.

What else they are doing to that processed gelatin and its real source is why I take the very minute amount of time to make my own...

Did I mention how amazing your house smells with Marrow Bones in the Crockpot?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on April 15, 2011
at 09:19 PM

any large bone with a quantity of Marrow in it. Yes, you can get marrow from virtually any bone. Ruminant preferred.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 15, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Are sulphur and sulphites/sulphur dioxide the same thing? I'm a little confused.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on April 15, 2011
at 06:10 PM

side question if you dont mind, what are marrow bones specifically? So if I ask for some how would I ask...and oh, I'm allergic to beef so are there marrow bones for chicken, pork (lamb I'm a little iffy on, maybe a new allergy)....

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