2

votes

Did you ask any questions to Gary Taubes today on the Huffington Post forums today?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 20, 2011 at 11:25 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/20/gary-taubes-nutrition_n_851603.html

The comments were pretty good.

His recs on the VAP also good.

Gary is making a nice comeback.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on June 02, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Can't beat the old "I know someone who does x and is doing fine" argument !

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 06, 2011
at 01:03 PM

Comeback from the dr oz editing nightmare. Many of my patients came away not impressed with his performance. And that effects their actions sadly. Humans aare easily effected by the smallest thing when they don't understand the causation

39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:53 PM

Comeback from what?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:09 AM

I don't mean to say that these things are an issue therefore carbs aren't, I just mean that there isn't any evidence for potatoes or rice causing insulin-resistance, only being potentially detrimental once someone is significantly insulin-resistant, so we might all agree that certainly less carbohydrate than some people are suggesting is good for the insulin-resistant at least. But then again we might just want to ask ourselves what is causing the insulin resistance in the first place.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:08 AM

I don't mean to say that these things are an issue therefore carbs aren't, I just mean that there isn't any evidence for potatoes or rice causing insulin-resistance, only being potentially detrimental once someone is significantly insulin-resistant, so we might all agree that certainly less carbohydrate than some people are suggesting is good for the insulin-resistant at least.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:06 AM

Leaky gut + endotoxins http://thepaleodiet.blogspot.com/2010/07/type-2-diabetes-and-endotoxemia.html Magnesium, chromium, probably others http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2010/08/30/dc10-0994.abstract. When there aren't enough anti-inflammatory eicosanoids to turn off the pro-inflammatory ones expediently. http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/05/eicosanoids-fatty-liver-and-insulin.html Dr. K knows this. So no carbohydrates aren't the issue in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Maybe refined sugar to an extent although the degree is debatable.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:41 AM

How do you measure "gut pathology"? Which nutrient deficiencies? What inflammation? At least low carb is easy to explain and carry out. With the other stuff it's all bound up in a lot of voodoo, quackery and mysterious "toxins" akin to 70s era alternative medicine fakes. You're perhaps not wrong (but: what is the specific mechanism that "nutrient deficiency" causes insulin resistance? carb-induced fatty liver seems to be the best candidate for liver-side insulin resistance) but there are practical concerns.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 21, 2011
at 12:10 AM

Yes, I do. Seeing as they both have worked at the New York Times I am wondering if they ever cross paths and if there have been any tense moments. It is entertaining to imagine the slurs they might unleash on one another in a board room.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Lol. I think you already know the answer to that.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:58 PM

I would ask him if he thinks Jane Brody is a moron.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:48 PM

The point of a low carb diet is to manage it, a low carb diet by itself can't reverse it. There are tons of mechanisms unrelated to carbohydrates by which we become insulin-resistant. Inflammation, nutrient deficiencies, gut pathology, etc etc. Sugar seems to play somewhat of a role and eating wheat likely does but that's really only the tip of the iceberg. Nobody ever become insulin-resistant by eating potatoes or fruit.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:40 PM

The whole point of the low carb diet would be to reverse insulin resistance. Do you have some other mechanism by which you might accomplish this?

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3 Answers

1
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I asked Taubes a question when he came to give a talk at my school.

The question was "You come up in Paleo diet circles a lot..." (confused onlookers wondering what that means) "...How important do you think eating seasonally is, since so many paleo practitioners are of European descent? Would some people crave periods of high sugar/fruit consumption perhaps?"

His answer was as expected: "Once you reduce/eliminate the really bad stuff, this is a minor issue. Some of my friends who eat this way eventually add tubers back in and do great."

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on June 02, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Can't beat the old "I know someone who does x and is doing fine" argument !

1
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:29 PM

Neat! I'm not going to but I would probably ask him: if he thinks that insulin resistance is the main cause of obesity then why a low carbohydrate diet to remedy the problem rather than reversing insulin resistance? Seems like a good question to me.

Not that I'm against less carbohydrate than is currently recommended by the mainstream, but it seems like a bit of a monomaniacal conclusion.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:09 AM

I don't mean to say that these things are an issue therefore carbs aren't, I just mean that there isn't any evidence for potatoes or rice causing insulin-resistance, only being potentially detrimental once someone is significantly insulin-resistant, so we might all agree that certainly less carbohydrate than some people are suggesting is good for the insulin-resistant at least. But then again we might just want to ask ourselves what is causing the insulin resistance in the first place.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:58 PM

I would ask him if he thinks Jane Brody is a moron.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:08 AM

I don't mean to say that these things are an issue therefore carbs aren't, I just mean that there isn't any evidence for potatoes or rice causing insulin-resistance, only being potentially detrimental once someone is significantly insulin-resistant, so we might all agree that certainly less carbohydrate than some people are suggesting is good for the insulin-resistant at least.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:40 PM

The whole point of the low carb diet would be to reverse insulin resistance. Do you have some other mechanism by which you might accomplish this?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 21, 2011
at 12:10 AM

Yes, I do. Seeing as they both have worked at the New York Times I am wondering if they ever cross paths and if there have been any tense moments. It is entertaining to imagine the slurs they might unleash on one another in a board room.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 20, 2011
at 11:48 PM

The point of a low carb diet is to manage it, a low carb diet by itself can't reverse it. There are tons of mechanisms unrelated to carbohydrates by which we become insulin-resistant. Inflammation, nutrient deficiencies, gut pathology, etc etc. Sugar seems to play somewhat of a role and eating wheat likely does but that's really only the tip of the iceberg. Nobody ever become insulin-resistant by eating potatoes or fruit.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:41 AM

How do you measure "gut pathology"? Which nutrient deficiencies? What inflammation? At least low carb is easy to explain and carry out. With the other stuff it's all bound up in a lot of voodoo, quackery and mysterious "toxins" akin to 70s era alternative medicine fakes. You're perhaps not wrong (but: what is the specific mechanism that "nutrient deficiency" causes insulin resistance? carb-induced fatty liver seems to be the best candidate for liver-side insulin resistance) but there are practical concerns.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Lol. I think you already know the answer to that.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 21, 2011
at 02:06 AM

Leaky gut + endotoxins http://thepaleodiet.blogspot.com/2010/07/type-2-diabetes-and-endotoxemia.html Magnesium, chromium, probably others http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2010/08/30/dc10-0994.abstract. When there aren't enough anti-inflammatory eicosanoids to turn off the pro-inflammatory ones expediently. http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/05/eicosanoids-fatty-liver-and-insulin.html Dr. K knows this. So no carbohydrates aren't the issue in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Maybe refined sugar to an extent although the degree is debatable.

0
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on May 05, 2011
at 03:49 PM

Really, Stabby? I thought sugar (refined sugar), and by extension, fructose was responsible for the pathogenesis of IR. I do know about gluten. Yes, I am convinced that "safe starches" such as yams, sweet potatoes, and yuca do not induce IR. But these have very little sugar.

However, "endogenous sugar" in the form of tropical fruits would seem to cause IR? But perhaps you're right. I haven't heard any Kitavans or those from tropical, fruit-rich countries contracting diabetes without first consuming white flour or "exogenous sugar".

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