3

votes

DIY resources for vegetable gardening

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 11, 2012 at 10:58 AM

Does anyone know of any good resources on starting and developing a vegetable garden? Just had a delicious cauliflower mash for dinner and thought hey, I should ditch the bulk farmed variety, not have to pay the exorbitant price of organic and grow my own!

Thankyou

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:10 AM

I have seen that book recommended, so many times on permies.com

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 12, 2012
at 02:05 PM

I'm planning a raised wicking bed in my back yard at some point. I think it'll be more of a pain up front but should pay off quickly after it's functional. Good luck.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on May 11, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I am downunder atm but moving to New Zealand in a week but pretty much the same country haha. I have seen costa on telly and will suss out the wicking idea, seem's like a labour saver for sure!

4b05d725a8332e8e917a4ca58b6e8a1e

(1239)

on May 11, 2012
at 04:14 PM

+1 Regional-specific gardening advice is so key.

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8 Answers

3
2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 11, 2012
at 01:35 PM

Check your local public library. They should have a handful of regional-specific books- i.e. "Gardening in Northern Wisconsin," that sort of thing. It can help you figure out if you even live in a decent area for growing cauliflower, when to start it, when you can expect to harvest it, tips or suggestions for making it work in your area, etc.

Google for blogs in your same region, too. Some of the generic gardening websites are useful for basics, but look for region-specific information. If you live in Seattle and you're following gardening advice from someone in Georgia, you may not have great succcess.

4b05d725a8332e8e917a4ca58b6e8a1e

(1239)

on May 11, 2012
at 04:14 PM

+1 Regional-specific gardening advice is so key.

2
C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 11, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Aussiebloke, you wouldn't happen to be in Australia would you? Strangely that is the hotbed of activity of wicking gardens. They're more complicated than a regular raised bed to build but they're worth it in that they drastically cut water use, number of times watering per week and supposedly increase plant productivity as well.

Wicking Beds:
http://www.insideurbangreen.org/2011/03/australia-wicking-beds-also-known-as-sub-irrigated-raised-beds.html

"The wicking worm bed is a highly productive growing system which not only produces more food from limited water, but also recycles waste organic material to provide plant nutrient and capture carbon. The essence is to form an underground reservoir of water or pond contained by a waterproof container or liner below the surface of the soil. Plants are productive because they have a continuous supply of water and nutrients." Colin Austin

Crazy looking Aussie sounding guy building wicking garden beds:
http://www.sbs.com.au/shows/costa/listings/detail/i/1/article/6172/Wicking-Garden-Beds

Square Foot Gardening basically gives you a clear framework and guide for where to plant and how much space each plant needs. This way your plants don't get crowded by over planting.
http://www.squawkfox.com/2009/06/25/diy-square-foot-gardening/

You likely have a local source like a garden center or nursery. Give them a visit and pick their brains for resources locally. Check online as well. Boolean searches are you friend.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 12, 2012
at 02:05 PM

I'm planning a raised wicking bed in my back yard at some point. I think it'll be more of a pain up front but should pay off quickly after it's functional. Good luck.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on May 11, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I am downunder atm but moving to New Zealand in a week but pretty much the same country haha. I have seen costa on telly and will suss out the wicking idea, seem's like a labour saver for sure!

2
Ef228708abd5f082f633b1cd1d64eee1

(892)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:04 PM

I've been attempting to figure out how to do square foot gardening, and http://mysquarefootgarden.net/ has been the best online resource for me. I just received the actual book for my birthday, I'm going to read it and hope it helps keep my seedlings alive...

2
0fa7b6eeca5ca63a0b23d0e4e1ca3ab7

on May 11, 2012
at 01:10 PM

check out organicgardening.com (on FB too) plus homestead survival (.com and on FB). Both great resources on "how to".

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32566)

on May 11, 2012
at 05:15 PM

Check out the book "Gaia's Garden". It's a home-scale permaculture manual that I have found really useful.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:10 AM

I have seen that book recommended, so many times on permies.com

1
Medium avatar

on May 11, 2012
at 02:52 PM

I do not grow anything myself, but recently watched the documentary "Truck Farm" and it was awesome. It shows several methods of small space gardening. If I didn't have so much going on already I would try some of them out. The film is very much infotainment. I laughed many times.

0
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on May 13, 2012
at 03:12 AM

If you're tight on space or don't have arable land, check out Window Farming. You probably wouldn't be able to grow big stuff like squash and cauliflower, but herbs, leafy greens, tomatoes and berries etc for sure!

0
29905c3607af0c110927ac9d0e77127a

(0)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:40 AM

has a great Facebook

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