2

votes

a good composter, any suggestions?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 21, 2011 at 4:45 PM

My husband and I are going to have a garden this next season, so I have been working on getting the earth prepared. My next quest is to find a good composter. I have read so many reviews and talked to a few people that have had them, and no one seems to be happy with the one they have. Does anyone have any suggestions on a good one that is easy to put together too? Apparently assembly is an issue with many of them.

Thanks

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on December 31, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Thank you Heidi, this is great information. I am going to start a layer garden, and this is perfect for that.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on August 25, 2011
at 01:46 AM

thankyou Grenadine, this could be exactly what I need.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on August 23, 2011
at 04:20 AM

Thanks --------

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on August 22, 2011
at 06:31 AM

You are correct. I do like biodynamic, but don't always have the luxury of being able to do it due to other factors.

91fe5b7e10068df9f147ee84320e38f7

(614)

on August 22, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Wood chips aren't necessarily biodynamic -- they are super-nitrogen intensive, for one. Also: depends on a. where they're from/ harvesting techniques/green factor, and b. are the particular woods you're using suitable to the crops you're growing? E.g. if you're using certain evergreen wood chips, you could screw your entire crop. More specific info on this would be worth looking in to.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 21, 2011
at 09:03 PM

And @Karen is right- a worm composter is a great idea.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 21, 2011
at 09:02 PM

I agree with leaving it exposed to air- maybe you could partially cover it because the amount of moisture needs to be controlled too. Would it be on a covered porch?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 21, 2011
at 08:06 PM

A bucket is really to small to do any composting. You may want to try worm composting. http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/other/compost_mulch/hgic1607.html

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on August 21, 2011
at 05:19 PM

I'm working on setting up a vertical garden on my apartment balcony. Was thinking I could start some compost in a small bucket on the porch. Can it be sealed, or does it have to be open to the air?

  • 662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

    asked by

    (656)
  • Views
    894
  • Last Activity
    1282D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

3
559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on August 21, 2011
at 07:51 PM

This might not be right for you, but i do vermicomposting (worms!). You can easily make your own bin/s with regular plastic storage tubs. It's completely UNSMELLY (i keep my bin indoors), and it works faster than waiting for the stuff to turn to compost on it's own. There's almost no maintenance. Here's a random link to get the gist.

My bin is just like this without any of that fancy louvering business for the holes (they're covered with cheap screening, taped) no spigot, & no bottom lid/drip tray (unnecessary).

It's super easy. And, pretty fun. I <3 my pet worms! :)

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on August 25, 2011
at 01:46 AM

thankyou Grenadine, this could be exactly what I need.

1
9187eaebfeb41476713663fd3259eaee

on August 21, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Compost needs to have air so that the aerobic bacteria can do their work. No air will create an anaerobic condition, and yo will get unbelievably bad smells and methane production from it. You may want to try using a worm bin for your composting.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 21, 2011
at 04:54 PM

We live in the country and all I use is a 3-sided collection of pallets formed in a square to contain the materials. This makes it easy to access to turn the pile with a garden fork.

In town it would be better to have a container to avoid upsetting neighbours. My son uses a drum which has a hatch to add materials and to mix things he just has to rotate the drum. That seems to work well.

When I was lucky enough to live on a hobby farm I found the fastest way to get the compost working was to add chicken poop!

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on August 21, 2011
at 05:19 PM

I'm working on setting up a vertical garden on my apartment balcony. Was thinking I could start some compost in a small bucket on the porch. Can it be sealed, or does it have to be open to the air?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 21, 2011
at 08:06 PM

A bucket is really to small to do any composting. You may want to try worm composting. http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/other/compost_mulch/hgic1607.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 21, 2011
at 09:02 PM

I agree with leaving it exposed to air- maybe you could partially cover it because the amount of moisture needs to be controlled too. Would it be on a covered porch?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on August 23, 2011
at 04:20 AM

Thanks --------

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 21, 2011
at 09:03 PM

And @Karen is right- a worm composter is a great idea.

0
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on December 04, 2011
at 02:46 AM

I have a wooden compost bin that I use to compost the old tomato and squash vines etc. each fall after harvest. Composting these helps to break the insect and disease cycle. Other than that, I am one of those old hippie "compost happens" gardeners. In other words, why work at composting when it will eventually happen without you? And if you just compost directly in your garden, it adds to the mulch layer and eventually improves the soil right where you need it! I keep a heavy mulch cover (usually straw or chemical-free grass clippings, but also use cardboard and shredded paper) or vegetative cover on my garden at all times. When I take out the kitchen scraps, I just bury them under the mulch. When I weed the garden I just pull and let them lie. I also get coffee grounds from some local coffee shops and those just go directly into the mulch layer. My entire garden is a big, slowly composting worm haven! It works fantastically! I never till and never work at composting. I just keep adding as much organic matter as I can get my hands on and I grow some of the best greens, apples, and squash you have ever seen. I hope to add a hive of bees and chickens into the system in the next few years. That should just about complete the needed garden ecology!

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on December 31, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Thank you Heidi, this is great information. I am going to start a layer garden, and this is perfect for that.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on August 22, 2011
at 02:27 AM

I have tried dozens of systems and prefer open piles, covered with a cap of wood chips or dirt and allowed to cold compost. I like the biodynamic way of building the piles, even though I don't use their specific innoculants.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on August 22, 2011
at 06:31 AM

You are correct. I do like biodynamic, but don't always have the luxury of being able to do it due to other factors.

91fe5b7e10068df9f147ee84320e38f7

(614)

on August 22, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Wood chips aren't necessarily biodynamic -- they are super-nitrogen intensive, for one. Also: depends on a. where they're from/ harvesting techniques/green factor, and b. are the particular woods you're using suitable to the crops you're growing? E.g. if you're using certain evergreen wood chips, you could screw your entire crop. More specific info on this would be worth looking in to.

0
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 21, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Unless you are in town with neighbors with excessively tender sensibilities skip the commercial bins. Either use an open pile turned with a pitch fork or make a 3-4' per side bin out of pallets (as above), concrete blocks, boards or anything else that will confine but allow easy turning. A row of 3 piles or bins is ideal so that you can turn from beginning pile to working pile to finished and ready to use pile. Some easy homemade bins - http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/dg5553.html Note that you can find many, many more by googling. Basically compost needs brown material (high carbon - fall leaves, wood chips, paper, etc), green material (high nitrogen - manure, vegetable food scraps, weeds without seeds or running roots, garden refuse free of disease or insect infestation, etc), air and moisture. Frequent turning keeps air in the pile and heats it up so that pathogens are killed and the compost is produced faster. http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/other/compost_mulch/hgic1600.html

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!