3

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Anybody have advice for someone who recently had a minor gallbladder attack?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 16, 2012 at 1:47 PM

My doctor said if it happens a second time, that I might consider having my gallbladder removed. I want to avoid that if possible. And I don't want to take medication or herbs for the rest of my life.

My diet is high in protein and fat and low in fiber and carbs. I don't eat garbage, but apparently something is wrong. I am probably twenty pounds overweight on a small frame. Is the solution as straightforward as losing the weight?

I evacuated a lot of gallstones. Maybe that's the end of it?

Could this be related to choline deficiency and fatty liver disease?

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 13, 2013
at 04:46 AM

answer chosen by the service

851edf7b3d1edf4eac25edbadb2d5cc1

(95)

on January 12, 2013
at 10:11 PM

I mean no disrespect when I say this but if the majority of nursing instructors and several nursing students have all had their gall bladders removed, to me, this points to a very big problem within Western Medicine and some of its beliefs.

705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

(1013)

on December 22, 2012
at 04:58 AM

Thumbs down, removing an organ is a huge deal. Would hope for better advice from a nursing program.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on December 16, 2012
at 05:28 PM

I would say removing an internal organ from your body is a very big deal.

F62b26c1d5e6a825db196dff220e3b7e

(8)

on December 16, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Yes, that's correct. A great deal of it also has to do with where I'm at emotionally. Sometimes I can tolerate eggs unless I'm under a great deal of emotional stress. That is just me and my experience though. Conversely my mother had her gallbladder removed and she just couldn't tolerate apples. Here's a link. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/175667-overview

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on December 16, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Upper right quadrant? Gallbladder area, right? Hmmm.... eggs are pretty fatty, and high in choline as well. Do you notice this pain when you eat other fatty foods or just eggs?

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6 Answers

best answer

4
705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

on December 22, 2012
at 05:25 AM

Is the solution as straightforward as losing the weight?

I would guess the problems are related to what you're eating and not your weight. Have you tried any kind of elimination diet? I saw Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride speak very convincingly about the GAPS diet (website, book) and how she thinks it can help with gall bladders.

Could this be related to choline deficiency and fatty liver disease?

She opened by saying that gall stones are caused by the liver being overloaded with too much detoxification work. I am not sure if this would relate to fatty liver disease?

Some of her very specific recommendations for gall bladder issues: 1. Juicing and "GAPS" milkshakes to dissolve and remove stones (milkshake = Celery, apple, carrot juices with raw egg and sour cream whisked in). The eggs might help choline deficiency too. 2. Ox Bile, Probiotics for digestive support (or Digestive Enzymes) 3. Coffee enemas

I evacuated a lot of gallstones. Maybe that's the end of it?

She was also emphatic about not rushing to the hospital during a gall bladder attack because they will simply remove the organ - usually after stones have already passed and only sludge remains. Instead she recommended a hot water bottle go where the pain is and drinking epsom salts.

Depending on what you're eating that triggers the attack, the foods may need to be eliminated but they may also be tolerable after your body and digestion recover. For example, the GAPS diet initially eliminates dairy and then reintroduces it gradually.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 13, 2013
at 04:46 AM

answer chosen by the service

3
C40ce8fc4392ea8ee1f8194f40540307

(110)

on December 20, 2012
at 06:16 PM

I had my gallbladder removed and while the surgery itself is not a big deal. The side effects you have for the rest of your life are a big deal. Ever heard of "dumping syndrome?" Good times. And I still have pain where it was removed eight years later.

Do you still eat dairy? If you do, you might try getting rid of that. I would just really clean up my diet, if I were you. Maybe go on the whole30.

Eight years ago I followed conventional wisdom and ate nearly a zero fat and ultra high carb diet trying to cure it. Let me tell you it was a resounding failure. :) So don't try that.

2
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on January 12, 2013
at 08:37 PM

Read Weston Price website. There is one page there in health section about gall bladders. The naturopath recommends a diet. I would try to eat super clean plus some cholesterol (animal fat) with each meal. A little bit might do it.

TRY TO SAVE YOUR GALL BLADDER AT ALL COSTS!!!!

0
6df687f771c8c3bbf2c37b2333645991

on January 12, 2013
at 09:24 PM

I like Justin's advice. I read this the other day and pinned it to one of my Pinterest boards because I figured it would come in handy: http://www.20somethingallergies.com/stop-a-gall-bladder-attack-naturally/

0
87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

on December 24, 2012
at 12:15 PM

You may find this useful. I've read (can't find the article) that drinking loads of organic apple juice for a week before softens the stones making the cleanse easier.

http://www.relfe.com/gall_stone_cleanse.html

0
F62b26c1d5e6a825db196dff220e3b7e

on December 16, 2012
at 03:34 PM

Keep in touch with your doctor. You may well just have a genetic predisposition and high risk factors. If you're overweight and a woman that's just two right there.

I'm in nursing school and I'd say almost all my instructors, and a handful of people in my class had their gallbladder removed. It's really not a big deal. You should increase your fiber intake just for your colon's sake. Vegetables are good or a tablespoon of pure psyllium husk and plenty of water are options.

Keep a journal of foods that upset you so you can avoid them. For instance, I have to avoid eggs because they cause sharp pain in the upper right quadrant. The take away is to keep in touch with your doctor. They have access to all your labs and your history and have a better picture. If you don't like your western doctor consult a naturopathic doctor if you're looking for alternatives. Unfortunately most insurance companies don't cover naturaopathic medicine but if you set on doing everything you can it's worth a look.

Take care of yourself and best of luck.

F62b26c1d5e6a825db196dff220e3b7e

(8)

on December 16, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Yes, that's correct. A great deal of it also has to do with where I'm at emotionally. Sometimes I can tolerate eggs unless I'm under a great deal of emotional stress. That is just me and my experience though. Conversely my mother had her gallbladder removed and she just couldn't tolerate apples. Here's a link. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/175667-overview

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on December 16, 2012
at 05:28 PM

I would say removing an internal organ from your body is a very big deal.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on December 16, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Upper right quadrant? Gallbladder area, right? Hmmm.... eggs are pretty fatty, and high in choline as well. Do you notice this pain when you eat other fatty foods or just eggs?

705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

(1013)

on December 22, 2012
at 04:58 AM

Thumbs down, removing an organ is a huge deal. Would hope for better advice from a nursing program.

851edf7b3d1edf4eac25edbadb2d5cc1

(95)

on January 12, 2013
at 10:11 PM

I mean no disrespect when I say this but if the majority of nursing instructors and several nursing students have all had their gall bladders removed, to me, this points to a very big problem within Western Medicine and some of its beliefs.

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