5

votes

Fat to skinny. Heard that. But has anyone here successfully gone from skinny to "fat"?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 25, 2011 at 5:03 PM

The health world seems dominating by people needing to lose weight. But don't forgot there's the other half of the world who remain quiet about this, but desperatley try to gain weight and can't. The struggle to gain weight is just as bad as the struggle to lose it. Any successes out there and how you did it?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 30, 2011
at 03:08 AM

yeah I wouldn't be an asshole about it if having a spec of grain didn't make me physco, fatigued, and moody.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:09 PM

I have a BMI of barely-18 and body fat in the high teens. I am very thin and bony with pencil arms. I do too much muscle-building exercise as it is (something almost every day), I have to be careful not to overtrain because I have ongoing problems with my shoulders and hip sockets. I get stronger, but not significantly bigger. Some people just don't bulk up much no matter how heavy they lift. I'm about the same size and have a similar build as this powerlifter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Xq3ls5KHh0

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 27, 2011
at 01:16 AM

I assume when you say underweight you mean undermuscled? Or are you super low bf%? If you're undermuscled you need to do more muscle building exercise which will probably make it so you can eat more than 3000 calories without feeling poorly.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 12:42 AM

I eat about 3000 calories and much more than that makes me feel poorly. I have gained weight, but only about 5 lbs per year I've been paleo. What I am suggesting is that your comment is incorrect. There is nothing wrong with me, I eat plenty and I am still underweight.

14d2a231fb261051a036a6ab6ca7bebd

(616)

on June 26, 2011
at 06:01 PM

Mark: sometimes. I eat what I feel like eating. I think I'm pretty good at tuning into what my body needs. Most of the time it's meat and veggies, but if I really want a piece of bread and some black bean soup, I go for it. That doesn't happen very often though. I've learned that being overly dogmatic about food/health (or anything for that matter) didn't make me more right. It made me more of an asshole - so I stopped being dogmatic!

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on June 26, 2011
at 03:42 AM

Re: McAdams. Never heard that one before! ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:33 AM

You eat grains and legumes?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:41 PM

I eat as much as I can most days. You can't gain weight not eating anything. The more you eat the more you can eat, the less you eat the less you want to eat. If you get heartburn don't eat so much at one meal or don't eat so much protein at one meal. Animals are supposed to eat food that's life, life revolves around getting and eating food.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 09:35 PM

Right. The mounts have to be screwed in. They do have bars that are telescoping i.e. you twist them and they lengthen: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0013G4HIG

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:22 PM

The problem is that eating enough calories in order for me to gain fast, makes me hate being alive. There are few things more uncomfortable than constantly frocing myself to eat when I have no appetite, and stuffing my stomach until it's distended. I get nausea and sometimes, heartburn. And not only do I not have the ability to happily binge on carbs (very little satisfies), I have a lot of energy problems when I eat too many. Potatoes are much better for me than grains, sure, but eating 300g of them makes me so doze off in the afternoons and unable to wake up naturally in the mornings.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 25, 2011
at 09:07 PM

So if I'm understanding this right, the two mounts do need to be attached to the door frame? It's an awesome idea, and one I'd like to borrow, but I'm moving into a new place and I think my landlord might get cranky if I damage the door frame :)

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 08:51 PM

There are two mounts on either side that have tiny clips on pivots, essentially yes the pressure holds it in. I usually leave it in there though, after you trip over it a dozen or more times you remember it's there :) It's this thing with the pads removed: http://amzn.com/B002DHIQ7C

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 25, 2011
at 08:38 PM

Is that floor bar screwed into the door frame or is it just pressure holding it there?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 25, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Great Question! My friend needs this...

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:58 PM

editor confused me oops

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Mark looks like Rachel McAdams?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:32 PM

Forgot to add that from 26-28 I was 170. I ate iced cream every day, trail mix with m and m's, drank 1 beer every night right before bed. I had manboobs.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on June 25, 2011
at 06:58 PM

I like this "formula." There is no mass gain plan for a short period of time, but a sustained, slow progress toward adding muscle. Lift heavy; eat protein; rest and recovery. Growth will happen. The hard part is staying on track. Some days (at least for me), eating more just doesn't always appeal.

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9 Answers

4
14d2a231fb261051a036a6ab6ca7bebd

on June 25, 2011
at 06:12 PM

I have struggled long and hard with building and maintaining muscle mass. It can be a little frustrating when you open up to someone about it and their response is a quick dismissal of "Psh. I wish I had your problem."

For me, the path to success involved a combination of heavy resistance training, some HIIT, good rest and recovery, and making a conscious effort to eat more food and better food.

I switched from a typical runner's diet of fairly high carb, pretty low fat, to a more paleo diet of lower carbs, more fat. I also went through a long experimental elimination diet to see what foods made me feel and perform better.

The results? I all but eliminated grains and legumes - they made me feel bad. I reintroduced dairy because I felt and performed better with it. I always ate a lot of veggies, but I started eating more. I became a connoisseur of coconut oil. I ate more meat, but, interestingly, less pork and bacon... it made me feel worse.

I put on 10lbs - nearly all of it muscle - and I've kept it on for years.

While my particular diet is well suited to me, it may not be for others. Do your own experiments and find out what works for you. Then actively try to eat more food. Lift heavy things. Get good rest. Rinse and repeat.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on June 25, 2011
at 06:58 PM

I like this "formula." There is no mass gain plan for a short period of time, but a sustained, slow progress toward adding muscle. Lift heavy; eat protein; rest and recovery. Growth will happen. The hard part is staying on track. Some days (at least for me), eating more just doesn't always appeal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:33 AM

You eat grains and legumes?

14d2a231fb261051a036a6ab6ca7bebd

(616)

on June 26, 2011
at 06:01 PM

Mark: sometimes. I eat what I feel like eating. I think I'm pretty good at tuning into what my body needs. Most of the time it's meat and veggies, but if I really want a piece of bread and some black bean soup, I go for it. That doesn't happen very often though. I've learned that being overly dogmatic about food/health (or anything for that matter) didn't make me more right. It made me more of an asshole - so I stopped being dogmatic!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 30, 2011
at 03:08 AM

yeah I wouldn't be an asshole about it if having a spec of grain didn't make me physco, fatigued, and moody.

2
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 06:34 PM

I'm 5'8" and went from 115 pounds to 140 pounds.

When I eat high-fat I gain muscle weight and when I add too much starches I tend to loose muscle weight. But depending on what part of the training year I'm in I do have to add some starch in for training.

fat-to-skinny.-heard-that.-but-has-anyone-here-successfully-gone-from-skinny-to-

Imagine that already skinny frame 25 pounds lighter. And yes I work out in long johns.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 25, 2011
at 09:07 PM

So if I'm understanding this right, the two mounts do need to be attached to the door frame? It's an awesome idea, and one I'd like to borrow, but I'm moving into a new place and I think my landlord might get cranky if I damage the door frame :)

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 08:51 PM

There are two mounts on either side that have tiny clips on pivots, essentially yes the pressure holds it in. I usually leave it in there though, after you trip over it a dozen or more times you remember it's there :) It's this thing with the pads removed: http://amzn.com/B002DHIQ7C

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 09:35 PM

Right. The mounts have to be screwed in. They do have bars that are telescoping i.e. you twist them and they lengthen: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0013G4HIG

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 25, 2011
at 08:38 PM

Is that floor bar screwed into the door frame or is it just pressure holding it there?

1
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on June 25, 2011
at 08:09 PM

'The other half'? I would say maaaaybe 5% of the over-25 population. I know a ton of overweight adults who spent their childhood/early adulthood thin and eating tons... only to pack on 30-100 lbs when their metabolisms slowed and they continued to eat junk.

I weighed 94-99 lbs from ages 15 to 23 or so. After 2 years primal I am about 105-108 lbs, feeling better than I ever have physically, and hopefully will eventually reach my goal of 115 lbs (which is a number I think is achievable, would look good on me, and means I have enough lean and fat mass to be decently strong, and better get through illness or pregnancy). I'm just happy to be able to maintain in the range I'm in now, because that's never happened before. A couple times I got up to around this weight by eating loads of grains and sugar, but of course I didn't have the strength or muscle I do now, and lost it as soon as I stopped stuffing my face with thousands of calories worth of crap.

Health is more important than looks here, so I've decided to just try to maximize cals as much as possible without making myself feel ill from overeating (which happens to me very easily.. my theory is that I'm oversensitive to leptin), keep carbs moderate, in keeping with daily exertion, because too many (whether they're paleo or not) just make me feel crappy, and lift heavy. The weight is coming on, just very slowly and in spurts. High-fat seems to be what my body prefers, in many ways.

1
226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:21 PM

I have to eat high fat/high carb or the weight just flies off me. My body is a fat burning machine. Within a week I can notice a big difference if the local farmer's market runs out of grass-fed ground beef. I have a fit when that happens because I hate losing weight.

I was 105 my senior year in high school at 5'7". My sophomore year in college, I hit the gym under the guidance of my friend who was studying exercise science. He told me to load up on protein so I did that for the next 5 years and remained at 125 throughout. I think I hit 135 when I was 24.

Prior to Paleo I was eating gluten and dairy daily but most of my diet was protein-based. I think this is maybe why my body was so responsive to Paleo. Minus the gluten and dairy, my protein intake was high while my carbs were low. My saturated fat was low as well though.

I started Paleo at 140 at age 34. Two years later I'm 130. I eat the same amount of protein as I always did and 10x MORE fat.

Without the gluten and dairy, I can't keep on the weight. I believe dairy adds a great deal of bone mass in the long run and supports muscle growth but I won't touch it because of the casein.

I'd rather stay skinny.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on June 26, 2011
at 03:42 AM

Re: McAdams. Never heard that one before! ;)

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:32 PM

Forgot to add that from 26-28 I was 170. I ate iced cream every day, trail mix with m and m's, drank 1 beer every night right before bed. I had manboobs.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 25, 2011
at 06:16 PM

Do you have any reason to think that your blood sugar is not quite right?

Also, here's a post that addresses this topic as it relates to food intolerances: http://ibstreatmentcenter.blogspot.com/2011/01/inability-to-gain-weight.html

I think this can be true for non food allergies as well. I know someone who reduced exposure to latex and now gain maintain weight more easily. Still not that easy, but better.

1
8515be19faab037d37a788633e32b9f1

(290)

on June 25, 2011
at 05:49 PM

I always had a hard time gaining weight. In high school I tried weight gainer and got hives. As I got older I stayed about 105 at 5"2. I could never put on muscle. After each of my 3 daughters I lost too much weight and had a hard time nursing. After my third and hardest time gaining weight I found out I was hyperthyroid. But didn't find out until I started to gain weight and had bad mood swings. I was diagnosed with a hypo thyroid. I couldn't keep weight off! I'm 32 now and have a normal thyroid, eat paleo and my weight is stable at 112. The most muscle I had gained was when I followed a book called Chris Aceto's Championship Bodybuilding. I am definitely not a bodybuilder but it worked! It was a lot of weighing my food and heavy work outs.

1
D5096ff5baffc0ba5d20b21346414a7a

(1112)

on June 25, 2011
at 05:20 PM

My brother in law was under 125 pounds in high school at 5 ft. 11 in. He wrestled in his weight class and always won. They called him The Snake. He tried for many years to gain weight and never could. He probably did put on 10 pounds or so by his mid twenties, but was always very thin. Now at 60 years of age he has a little paunch. When I read Gary Taubes books the brother in law always came to mind as verification.

0
226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:24 PM

Oh, and you look like Rachel McAdams but I'm sure you've heard that before.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Mark looks like Rachel McAdams?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 07:58 PM

editor confused me oops

0
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 25, 2011
at 06:21 PM

People who have problems gaining weight either don't understand calories, have a nutritional deficiency or a genetic defect. So unless you have a genetic defect make sure you get enough calories/nutrition and you will gain.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:22 PM

The problem is that eating enough calories in order for me to gain fast, makes me hate being alive. There are few things more uncomfortable than constantly frocing myself to eat when I have no appetite, and stuffing my stomach until it's distended. I get nausea and sometimes, heartburn. And not only do I not have the ability to happily binge on carbs (very little satisfies), I have a lot of energy problems when I eat too many. Potatoes are much better for me than grains, sure, but eating 300g of them makes me so doze off in the afternoons and unable to wake up naturally in the mornings.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:41 PM

I eat as much as I can most days. You can't gain weight not eating anything. The more you eat the more you can eat, the less you eat the less you want to eat. If you get heartburn don't eat so much at one meal or don't eat so much protein at one meal. Animals are supposed to eat food that's life, life revolves around getting and eating food.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 12:42 AM

I eat about 3000 calories and much more than that makes me feel poorly. I have gained weight, but only about 5 lbs per year I've been paleo. What I am suggesting is that your comment is incorrect. There is nothing wrong with me, I eat plenty and I am still underweight.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 27, 2011
at 01:16 AM

I assume when you say underweight you mean undermuscled? Or are you super low bf%? If you're undermuscled you need to do more muscle building exercise which will probably make it so you can eat more than 3000 calories without feeling poorly.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:09 PM

I have a BMI of barely-18 and body fat in the high teens. I am very thin and bony with pencil arms. I do too much muscle-building exercise as it is (something almost every day), I have to be careful not to overtrain because I have ongoing problems with my shoulders and hip sockets. I get stronger, but not significantly bigger. Some people just don't bulk up much no matter how heavy they lift. I'm about the same size and have a similar build as this powerlifter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Xq3ls5KHh0

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