10

votes

Where should I put my paleo farm?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 21, 2010 at 8:32 PM

So I'm thinking of going into farming and I definitely want to have my farm focused on all things paleo. I already have some ideas- livestock centric with hardy "wild-type" breeds, grazing fields, fruit and nut trees, perhaps some vegetables or mushrooms. The question is "where?"

I'm looking for a place 1. not over a 6hr drive from a major transit hub/city. Paleos could come to the farm for food and exercise workshops. 2. amendable to my family's other hobby, which is alternative energy- preferably wind, but geothermal or solar would work too. 3. I personally prefer hillier landscapes, but any will do.

Do you know of a good place to look into?

Dc066d6722c92dd2e2dbc93088958bbf

(0)

on October 12, 2010
at 10:03 PM

I'm new here so I just saw your question for the first time today...and I immediately thought "Wisconsin". Why? Because I'm moving there next summer from SoCal (with my job) and have been dreaming of raising mangelitsa hogs on the side! As well as fruit trees, nuts, chickens, maybe turkeys, etc. I hope to see you at the local farmer's market someday!

959696458a6077067a5f3f47ab5b609b

(118)

on June 15, 2010
at 02:44 AM

Excellent news! I've been having a surprisingly difficult time finding other Paleos in the Chicago area, but I'm always looking for more ways to get involved in our growing community.

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on June 15, 2010
at 12:28 AM

Here's a local farm less than an hour outside of Portland who is doing something like what you may have in mind... http://www.kookoolanfarms.com/

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on June 15, 2010
at 12:27 AM

I'm in the Portland area too & can say it's a great place to grow food, but we have extremely restrictive land-use laws that drive up land prices attrociously - and limit what you can & can't do with a particular parcel. Fortunately, the recession has driven down the outrageously high land prices....

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on June 14, 2010
at 06:08 AM

I'll give you a vote up. I also live in LA and have been thinking about moving to Oregon.

872906e061e3a88fca188b7d547d322a

(10)

on June 14, 2010
at 01:53 AM

my apologies all, i meant to add my comment to jem's answer! i'm a newbie!

9dce97b4c4762a78a577a11585eef8f2

(1239)

on June 14, 2010
at 01:02 AM

Woo-Hoo! A new reason to visit my family in Wisconsin! Congratulations, how exciting!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on June 14, 2010
at 12:12 AM

North Georgia, cheap and good land

8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c

(2517)

on June 13, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Congratulations! That is fantastic!

Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on May 04, 2010
at 02:11 PM

Melissa, I just found this article, and it reminded me of this question and your interest in alternative energy. http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/solar-wind/4338280 It talks about Texas wind, solar, and bio-fuel operations currently underway. Texas currently produces more wind power than any other state (if we were a country we'd rank #7 in total wind power production world-wide).

D251185e140e7f3d8df603a08fdbeabd

(95)

on April 28, 2010
at 09:51 PM

I think you'd have a pretty good local base here, too!

587538a2db229b2ec884ea04cc3dc75e

(462)

on April 27, 2010
at 08:21 PM

Not a location, but I'm moving to DC soon and I've been scouting meat suppliers. These guys (forestfed.com) are running what looks like a very paleo farm to me. They have 75 acres and basically just fenced it in and released a bunch of pigs in there, jamon iberico style. They do some supplemental feeding, but I am still pretty excited about trying the pork.

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on April 27, 2010
at 03:54 PM

I second the Southeast to Central Texas. From coastal plains with flat grasslands, to the hill country with rolling hills and cool springs, to the Valley with citrus orchards, just about anything you want. Texas has stubborn individualism (good for paleos) as well as no state tax and strong property owner rights as Aaron stated. You can be close to a city without actually having to deal with it everyday.

587538a2db229b2ec884ea04cc3dc75e

(462)

on April 23, 2010
at 05:22 PM

Word. I am from Montpelier so I have to vote that up. I've thought about getting a farm around there myself and I see two major problems: land is super expensive, and because it's incredibly cold for five months, ten acres in Vermont is as productive as maybe three or four acres in California or Virginia or whatever. It is a great area though.

F652b96a3bcf646d8dad56cb1d035101

(205)

on April 22, 2010
at 06:34 PM

The Isle of Man! If you bought a farm you wouldn't need a work permit and I expect you'd be welcomed with open arms :) We might fall down on the major transit hub part .... unless you count air traffic .... lol

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on April 22, 2010
at 04:21 PM

An hour from DC would work for me! ;)

601220f71f4620dd6ed61ebab68cd252

(50)

on April 22, 2010
at 12:31 AM

there are some pretty places outside of PDX <3 !!!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 21, 2010
at 09:58 PM

I don't know anything outside the Britain Isles or visas but you could just marry someone from here, preferably someone who already has a farm. Land costs a fortune. Still you have lots of choice in the US.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 21, 2010
at 09:42 PM

I love this question!!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 21, 2010
at 09:05 PM

Probably the US...would love to live elsewhere, but unless people have an idea about how I can get a visa, I am sort of stuck here.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 21, 2010
at 08:35 PM

Any particular part of the world in mind?

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17 Answers

8
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on April 21, 2010
at 09:48 PM

Willamette Valley. Folks didn't call it Eden and undertake the arduous Oregon Trail in a Conestoga Wagon for nothin'. How close you are to population centers would be entirely a function of your budget.

601220f71f4620dd6ed61ebab68cd252

(50)

on April 22, 2010
at 12:31 AM

there are some pretty places outside of PDX <3 !!!

D251185e140e7f3d8df603a08fdbeabd

(95)

on April 28, 2010
at 09:51 PM

I think you'd have a pretty good local base here, too!

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on June 15, 2010
at 12:28 AM

Here's a local farm less than an hour outside of Portland who is doing something like what you may have in mind... http://www.kookoolanfarms.com/

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on June 15, 2010
at 12:27 AM

I'm in the Portland area too & can say it's a great place to grow food, but we have extremely restrictive land-use laws that drive up land prices attrociously - and limit what you can & can't do with a particular parcel. Fortunately, the recession has driven down the outrageously high land prices....

4
8e75344356f4a455185ee52da0b90bf2

on April 22, 2010
at 11:24 AM

I'd say just about anywhere between the appalachians and the ocean - Va, NC, SC, GA

I'm farming in the midlands of South Carolina. It's gorgeous, good rainfall, history of small farming, friendly people, not too cold, mid way (roughly) between Charlotte and Atlanta. Land and houses can be dirt cheap - I live in a 140 year old Victorian farmhouse on 6 acres that we bought in 2004 for 140k.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on June 14, 2010
at 12:12 AM

North Georgia, cheap and good land

3
Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on April 21, 2010
at 10:21 PM

South-East to Central Texas.

Depending on location Houston, San Antonio, Austin, and/or Dallas would be within 6 hours. Very ranch-friendly laws, very property-owner friendly laws. There are some good-sized wind-power providers in the state, though I'm no expert in that area.

Combination of forests and rolling hills depending on location, and a lot of rivers, lakes, and streams.

If you check EatWild.com's Texas Map you'll find quite a few farms. We like to support our local farms, and farmer's markets here.

http://www.eatwild.com/products/texas.html

Also it would be another farm I could visit! :)

Edit: I missed some stuff earlier!

We have no state taxes, we only deal with federal.

The Houston area has a small, but active and growing paleo meet-up group: http://www.meetup.com/Paleo-Eating-in-Houston-TX/

Lots of land available and a low cost of living compared to many areas of the country.

Texas smoked beef brisket! (this might be the most important point in my whole post)

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on April 27, 2010
at 03:54 PM

I second the Southeast to Central Texas. From coastal plains with flat grasslands, to the hill country with rolling hills and cool springs, to the Valley with citrus orchards, just about anything you want. Texas has stubborn individualism (good for paleos) as well as no state tax and strong property owner rights as Aaron stated. You can be close to a city without actually having to deal with it everyday.

Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on May 04, 2010
at 02:11 PM

Melissa, I just found this article, and it reminded me of this question and your interest in alternative energy. http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/solar-wind/4338280 It talks about Texas wind, solar, and bio-fuel operations currently underway. Texas currently produces more wind power than any other state (if we were a country we'd rank #7 in total wind power production world-wide).

2
6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 21, 2010
at 11:38 PM

The Shenandoah Valley would be a great place to start a farm. Virginia has a pretty big movement of grass farming and diversified family farms are growing here in the northern valley.

It's hemmed in by mountains, and as far as Ag. laws go, Virginia is pretty good. The climate is not too hot, not too snowy and not too cold, though it gets some of all those things.

The Valley has always been big on fruit trees (apples, peaches and cherries), and we have strawberries and blackberries too. Wineberries also grow here, and they are not available elsewhere, and I don't think anyone cultivates any variety of them. My yard is full of them, and they are fabulous! We have a burgeoning wine industry - lots of new, small wineries. A few of the area wineries are truly great.

We have black walnuts, and I suspect pecans would do all right here, but I'm not sure. My yard is mostly oak and hickory, with one persimmon tree. The fruit is...interesting.

We have a lot of heritage pork being raised here, and there's more heritage turkeys every year. There's a few family beef farming operations nearby too, and there's plenty of lamb around. We have a lot of big, commercial chicken farms, but there's no shortage of people with little flocks providing pastured eggs, and the farm where I buy mine also raises broilers as well as Jersey milk cows, beef and some lamb.

In short, this part of Virginia produces TONS of gorgeous green grass, but because of the rocks everywhere, no row-cropping to speak of. It's great for a grass farm!

DC is 60 miles away, and Philly would fit in your 6 hour window, if that's not enough for you.

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on April 22, 2010
at 04:21 PM

An hour from DC would work for me! ;)

2
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on April 21, 2010
at 09:42 PM

Vermont would be nice; Montpelier's got a good farmer's market and a college of some sort; I could see a Paleobusiness doing very well there.

587538a2db229b2ec884ea04cc3dc75e

(462)

on April 23, 2010
at 05:22 PM

Word. I am from Montpelier so I have to vote that up. I've thought about getting a farm around there myself and I see two major problems: land is super expensive, and because it's incredibly cold for five months, ten acres in Vermont is as productive as maybe three or four acres in California or Virginia or whatever. It is a great area though.

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on June 14, 2010
at 03:08 AM

The central NY finger lakes region is grown in small farm ownership and we occasionally have events like http://www.pathwayswellnessprogram.com/finger_lakes_farm_to_table.html

http://www.ediblecommunities.com/fingerlakes/ may be another good overview. And if you want to visit NYC it is only a few hours away by train.

http://farmwithview.com/ might still be for sale now.

1
872906e061e3a88fca188b7d547d322a

(10)

on June 14, 2010
at 01:50 AM

jem, I've been thinking about moving from LA to southern oregon and eventually growing/raising my own food. whereabouts do you live?

872906e061e3a88fca188b7d547d322a

(10)

on June 14, 2010
at 01:53 AM

my apologies all, i meant to add my comment to jem's answer! i'm a newbie!

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on June 14, 2010
at 06:08 AM

I'll give you a vote up. I also live in LA and have been thinking about moving to Oregon.

1
1aeb2cfacf9bc03644bcda640ce459ba

(154)

on April 28, 2010
at 02:50 AM

i have to go w southcentral oregon. your livestock can graze all year. we grow lots of fruits an berries. you can fish to your hearts content and hunt if you are inclined....or grow amazing grapes and make wine!

1
86a7abe4a54c4dc15ea44bacef00c5a8

on April 27, 2010
at 03:02 AM

Please come to Tennessee!! Middle TN has an abundance of farmland with rolling hills. Recently, there has been local movement toward CSA's, ranging from fruit and veggie to meat and dairy. There are numerous farmer's markets around Nashville. There is also a large Weston A. Price chapter in Nashville. Tennessee has no income tax and the Nashville airport is very accessible. Plus, you are only 3.5 hours from Atlanta.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 22, 2010
at 01:11 AM

eastern pennsyvania. hilly. lancaster county and amish around. highly populated areas like nyc and all of nj right around the corner. my grandfather's family farm (since turn of century and very small) is just by luck located in a ritzy town (in nj). so my bros can make a go as farmers now after they both lost their jobs last year. they both have road stands and travel to local farmer's markets.

1
5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on April 22, 2010
at 12:55 AM

I would think that almost anywhere east of the Mississippi River or the states just west of it could meet your criteria - six hours is a long haul!

Just a wild thought: Look for rural or semi-rural cohousing projects.

1
679b54b95233ac036e0cb666564becb6

on April 21, 2010
at 11:05 PM

Come to Arizona. Lots of great land available, lots of great farms. Judging by the wonderful grass-fed beef, pork and everything else we get here it could be ideal. Oh, and don't forget that you'd only be minutes from a major hub as requested and the land is still inexpensive.

0
95f4513b7d9deb9c3d5734709f3c5308

(182)

on August 01, 2012
at 03:39 AM

Houston, pretty please :)

0
A480640a53eb5dc8966f49141942f705

on June 14, 2010
at 07:40 AM

Have you had a chance to visit Joel Salatin at http://www.polyfacefarms.com/ ?

0
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 13, 2010
at 06:27 PM

We just bought a farm in the Madison area. It was pretty affordable and most of my family is in the Midwest, so even though I would love to live somewhere exotic, it's pretty nice. So....Midwesterners rejoice. Hopefully we can start some Movnat workshops, paleo workshops, meat shares, and whatnot for people in Madison/Chicago/Milwaukee.

8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c

(2517)

on June 13, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Congratulations! That is fantastic!

9dce97b4c4762a78a577a11585eef8f2

(1239)

on June 14, 2010
at 01:02 AM

Woo-Hoo! A new reason to visit my family in Wisconsin! Congratulations, how exciting!

959696458a6077067a5f3f47ab5b609b

(118)

on June 15, 2010
at 02:44 AM

Excellent news! I've been having a surprisingly difficult time finding other Paleos in the Chicago area, but I'm always looking for more ways to get involved in our growing community.

Dc066d6722c92dd2e2dbc93088958bbf

(0)

on October 12, 2010
at 10:03 PM

I'm new here so I just saw your question for the first time today...and I immediately thought "Wisconsin". Why? Because I'm moving there next summer from SoCal (with my job) and have been dreaming of raising mangelitsa hogs on the side! As well as fruit trees, nuts, chickens, maybe turkeys, etc. I hope to see you at the local farmer's market someday!

0
A6ea8651b56c37cef3ee8e1c84e8c3a0

on April 27, 2010
at 10:04 PM

I have to cast a selfish vote for the Athens Ohio area. There's plenty of farmland, and I can't imagine a better community for a paleo farm. A number of restaurants in town take pride in the fact that they use organic locally produced products, and there's a great farmers market that runs year round. As for alternative energy, the recreation center on campus generates power from people using the cardio equipment. It's 1.5 hours from Columbus and 3 hours from Cincinnati. If I had the time, money and skills, I'd love to do this myself.

0
39509fd8f4561ed4bf64959e582d0fda

on April 27, 2010
at 03:29 PM

Check this site out to ind your place in the country, there is nothing else out there like it, that I've found, anyway:

http://www.unitedcountry.com/

This is how I found my place. Keep in mind that 50 percent of the population lives within 100 miles of the coasts, so that's where land is most expensive. The midwest will give you the lowest prices per acre simply because there aren't as many people there competing for the land. There are lots and lots of abandoned farms and other empty land at prices you'd never find near the coasts. And yes, it's very beautiful, and the people are wonderful!

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