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How are cherries nutritionally?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 18, 2011 at 12:08 AM

I'm talking fresh whole cherries, not the candied stuff in a jar. We got some nice dark red cherries from the market that are wonderful. I'm sure they have some sugar but don't they also have other good things like melatonin too? I'm just wondering if, generally speaking, it's something to try to avoid or if it's a good choice fruit wise.

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82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 01, 2011
at 01:29 PM

I'm just wondering if, generally speaking, it's something to try to avoid or if it's a good choice fruit wise.

You suggested that we answer this question by looking at micronutrients. But lots of fruit have micronutrients. Unless there's some special micronutrient in cherries that you're hankering for, I don't think that's the main thing we need to look at when we compare fruits.

The main thing is the amount of sugar, especially fructose.

The problem with cherries is that they contain a huge amount of total sugar and fructose compared to most other fruits. Here's a table so you can compare:

http://www.thepaleodiet.com/nutritional_tools/fruits_table.html

As you can see, only three fruits (bananas, grapes, mangos) have more total sugar, and only three fruits have more fructose (apples, grapes, and pears).

Fructose is toxic. Our bodies can handle it safely only in small amounts.

This means that we can eat only a small amount of cherries before the dose of fructose gets so high that it becomes bad for us.

In comparison, we can eat a lot more blueberries because they have less fructose.

Does this mean blueberries are better than cherries? Well, they are better if you want to eat the largest amount of fruit possible. But it really means there is a choice. It's equally harmless to eat a small amount of cherries or a larger amount of blueberries.

Cherries happen to be my favorite fruit. Unfortunately, once I start eating them, I can't stop. I have to buy them in small amounts! :)

1
Medium avatar

on January 18, 2011
at 12:22 AM

This should help: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1867/2

Honestly, there really are a lot of sugars there, but if you really enjoy them then you should still eat them here and there. Obviously there is some nutrition present.

Candy doesn't really grow on trees.

0
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 01, 2011
at 03:55 AM

With lashings of cream

0
8274ce9d4bffd8209055e1e34def04d6

(429)

on January 18, 2011
at 12:57 AM

I think cherries can be a better choice than apples and bananas. They feel more filling and less "I WANT MORE SUGAR!!!" the way apples can be for me. :D

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