7

votes

Gold standard vegetables

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 02, 2012 at 6:16 AM

I know that in the Paleo world we have this gold standard for meat (i.e. grass fed), but am unaware of the gold standard for vegetables. Seeing as how modern soil depletion is a crucial factor in the nutritive value of vegetable, I think it'd be awesome if someone could recommend some ways to distinguish quality veggies over the feedlot equivalent junk. Any specific companies that have your confidence behind them would be appreciated, seeing as how I'd like to find a good vendor for some good root veggies and such. Thanks again for your help everyone!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 02, 2012
at 06:38 PM

Of course I did Peter. The question is about vegetables. Vegetables are not "grassfed". The search tags on this site are a mess as it is, without adding irrelevant search tags to topics.

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on April 02, 2012
at 05:58 PM

I LOVE your comment about picking veggies that DON'T look uniform. We do it all the time!

Fc6a9e07f6056d465573c8969d3a2ddd

(370)

on April 02, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Concise and spot-on.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on April 02, 2012
at 12:09 PM

Just as an aside, there are some folks who don't think that modern soil depletion is really an issue: http://mdprevent.blogspot.com/2012/03/truth-about-soil-depletion-conclusions.html

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on April 02, 2012
at 09:22 AM

Warren, did you read the question?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 02, 2012
at 07:32 AM

What has "grassfed" and "fruit" got to do with vegetables?

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7 Answers

9
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:58 AM

Local, seasonal, organic and look for heirloom.

Fc6a9e07f6056d465573c8969d3a2ddd

(370)

on April 02, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Concise and spot-on.

4
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on April 02, 2012
at 06:40 AM

Look for things that are locally grown and organic. We have a COOP grocer that is very picky about their vegies and it shows.

4
F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on April 02, 2012
at 06:26 AM

It really depends on the soil at the specific farm they were grown at - which varies significantly from area to area.

As a general rule I think best is grow yourself followed by buying directly from a farm/ CSA.

Obviously organic is best choice, but I'd also say to go for seasonal and to pick veg that doesn't look perfect/ uniform.

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on April 02, 2012
at 05:58 PM

I LOVE your comment about picking veggies that DON'T look uniform. We do it all the time!

1
1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:36 PM

I agree with the above answer: CSA is the way to go! Most areas have some local farmers that do Community Supported Agriculture; you pay the farmer ahead of time for a share in his produce. When things get rolling, you get a box of produce each week. Usually it's delivered to a central location where you can pick it up, but some farmers even deliver to your door. Since you will be getting whatever is coming on at the farm, you'll find yourself getting creative in the kitchen. I have found lots of new favorite foods this way.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on April 03, 2012
at 01:34 PM

You can go with "high-brix" vegetables, or with farmers who use Dr. Albrecht's methods.

0
4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 02, 2012
at 08:15 PM

Organic is a decent start, but many people don't realize that organic plants don't necessarily need to chemical free. They just need to be artificially chemical free. So the fertilizers, fungicides, insecticides whatever can still be used as long as they are naturally occuring, and not made in a lab. Farmer's markets allow you to talk to them and ask.

From a soil depletion outlook is that it's good to buy things in season. Depending on your location in the world, during certain points of the year different plants will grow better at certain times. There are two types of plants and without getting too scientific, there are "warm season" and "cool season" types of plants. Also rotating crops, and even crop fields seasonally and yearly will greatly reduce soil depletion as plants are similar to us in that they all have requirements but different types also require different micronutrients. I'd suggest that most* local farmer's know this stuff and work it into their advantage because they don't have the huge budgets like big agrobusinesses. Rotating plants and fields will replenish nutrients or use up different ones while giving back others or allowing the other micronutrients to recycle more. A simple one for instance is that clovers (your normal 3-4 leaf clover patches) grow very well in nitrogen depleted soild, all the while are helping the soil by being one of the few naturally occurring plants that re-nitrogenate it.

If things are growing in abundance easily, they will be cheap at the market. It's a good sign of optimal growing conditions and will greatly reduce the impact on the soil they are being grown on. Much like pasturing cows fertilizing the fields. Forcing things to grow anywhere will require more fertilizer, sometimes other special nutrients and will further deplete the same resources they are probably being subsidized with into the ground. I apologize if this is a little much, I know a lot of people are good with diet science, but plant/soil science is pretty awesome too (in my opinion).

0
C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on April 02, 2012
at 05:56 PM

CSAs, growing your own, and even G.R.U.B. co-ops (GRUB stands for different things in different cities, but they're essentially alternates to CSAs)!

The more I've gotten into my own growing, I'm now realizing HOW IMPORTANT your soil is (It all passes through to YOU), so make sure you're rotating and replenising, composting, etc.

I recently saw some study done (a chart) comparing Organic vs. conventional farming and the vitamin/mineral content in each veggie/fruit. I don't know how reliable the study is, but it makes sense, right? Organic being way above conventional.

The BEST other two cents is KNOW YOUR FARMER!!! Go to your local farmer's markets and ask questions.

Happy Eating!

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