2

votes

Does fruit's glycemic index increase with ripening?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 16, 2010 at 2:14 PM

I heard before that with some fruits the glycemic index increases as they ripen, is this true?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on February 16, 2010
at 05:20 PM

Did you at least stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night?

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2 Answers

3
Fc42f9b240d07564160e233d7f75762e

on February 16, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Would seem to make sense (warning: I'm not a biochemist; don't even play one on TV). But my understanding is that generally the process of "ripening" involves the conversion of starch and other carbohydrates to sugars. Total carb count wouldn't change, but more of it would become converted to "faster burning" sugars.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on February 16, 2010
at 05:20 PM

Did you at least stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night?

2
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on June 02, 2010
at 02:38 PM

it involves a chemical change where protopectin is converted into soluble pectin. Starch is also converted into sugars. The fruits release ethylene gas , which also causes the color change.

In short, Yes, the riper the sweeter and therefore the higher GI

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