9

votes

Are there any studies showing whole fruits have negative effects?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 10, 2011 at 4:45 PM

Most conventional studies show fruit to be beneficial and fruit is usually maligned for its fructose content, but most studies I have seen only study fructose as an isolated substance. My question is, have there been any studies that show the detrimental affects of whole fruit, not just fructose?

36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:30 PM

Whoops, forgot to link to the discussion! Here it is http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/10/paleolithic-diet-clinical-trials.html

36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:28 PM

Mr Quilt, are you saying that the inclusion of fruit in the paleolithic diet trial discussed here caused worse outcome than if it were excluded? In this trial, the 12 subjects on the paleo diet who started with elevated fasting glucose all ended with normal fasting glucose. How bad do you think the fruit is, really?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 11, 2011
at 05:12 AM

i dont buy that for one minute. If you have diabetes fructose from fruit will hurt you.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:25 PM

interesting though the study that I mention below suggests that whole fruit might have a positive effect on diabetes (at least on the risk to contract type 2 diabetes)

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:04 PM

Hmm interesting...looks like the fiber content in fruit might play a part in how it is metabolized. I think Lustig mentioned something to that effect.

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7 Answers

8
Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

on March 10, 2011
at 05:42 PM

I have not found any study about negative effects from whole fruit, although the regular consumption of fruit juice (orange, apple, etc) has been shown to have detrimental effects, based on their large sugar content. "A large prospective study involving over 71,346 nurses, as part of the Nurse???s Health Study, looked at the issue of fruit and vegetable intake and how it affects the risk of type 2 diabetes. It found that eating whole fruits and vegetables lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes, while drinking fruit juice had the opposite effect - it elevated the risk. This was true even after researchers controlled for other factors that could affect type 2 diabetes risk. Munching on three additional servings of whole fruit a day lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes by 18%, but drinking just one added serving of fruit juice daily raised the risk by the same amount. Not good news for fruit juice lovers.

Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/health/diabetes/articles/107973.aspx#ixzz1GDg3QB8a"

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:04 PM

Hmm interesting...looks like the fiber content in fruit might play a part in how it is metabolized. I think Lustig mentioned something to that effect.

2
44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

on November 28, 2012
at 09:44 AM

No. The health issues frutarians suffer is from crowding out other foods and nutrients, not the fruit itself per se.

2
39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:14 PM

I avoid both merely because either whole fruit or juice spikes my blood sugar (the latter far more and more quickly than the former). I'll indulge in a small bowl of bluberries in heavy cream once in awhile, but - for me - that is a luxury.

I think that's what I've heard Taubs say lately: whether you can eat fruit and tubers depends on your metabolism, whether you're trying to lose weight, and whether you're diabetic.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 11, 2011
at 05:12 AM

i dont buy that for one minute. If you have diabetes fructose from fruit will hurt you.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:25 PM

interesting though the study that I mention below suggests that whole fruit might have a positive effect on diabetes (at least on the risk to contract type 2 diabetes)

36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:30 PM

Whoops, forgot to link to the discussion! Here it is http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/10/paleolithic-diet-clinical-trials.html

36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:28 PM

Mr Quilt, are you saying that the inclusion of fruit in the paleolithic diet trial discussed here caused worse outcome than if it were excluded? In this trial, the 12 subjects on the paleo diet who started with elevated fasting glucose all ended with normal fasting glucose. How bad do you think the fruit is, really?

0
887a9c6c0ee243584548f02d45c439a6

(415)

on November 28, 2012
at 01:46 PM

Take a look at Hyperlipid, he has few articles about fruits and vegetables, most relevant probably being this one:

http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2007/12/fruit-and-vegetables-re-post.html

0
Edd5e3664c12600dcaae18b4c6bb862a

on May 26, 2012
at 08:41 PM

http://drbenkim.com/articles-fruit.html "Regardless of which approach is taken, I have not met a single strict fruitarian of more than two years who didn't have significant health challenges. The most common challenges are dental decay, osteoporosis, wasting of muscle tissue, inability to maintain a healthy weight, chronic fatigue, skin problems, thinning hair, weakening nails, and excessive irritability.

Some of these problems are the result of nutritional deficiencies. The most common deficiencies that I know of in this population are vitamins B12, A*, D, zinc, and certain essential fatty acids.

Another problem with a high fruit diet is that it can lead to problems involving the hormones that regulate your blood sugar; insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone. A chronic imbalance of these hormones is a sure way to develop cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The encouraging news is that when you eat fruits in moderation, they can contribute to excellent overall health and fitness. "

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