1

votes

Are quinces nutritionally interesting?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 23, 2010 at 6:22 AM

I have always loved the taste of quinces. Unfortunately, if one finds quinces in Belgium, people always made them very sweet with honey, or made jam with them. Now that is not really paleo.

But I recently discovered that they are delicious if you bake them in butter. Really great fresh, rosy and mildly sweet.

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Here is the nutritional brakedown:

The average nutritional composition of quince fruit is (per 100g edible portion): Water 83.8% Vitamin A 40 IU Protein 0.4 g Vitamin B1 (thiamin) 0.02 mg Fat 0.1 g Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 0.03 mg Carbohydrate 15.3 g Vitamin C 15-20 mg Calcium 11 mg Phosphorus 17 mg Iron 0.7 mg Potassium 197 mg Sodium 4 mg

How does this compare to more conventional fruits like apple, pear, ...

(Note that this is a nerdy question, and that I will enjoy quinces now and then (if I can find them), no mather what the nutritional profile is)

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 24, 2010
at 04:24 PM

Yeah, lamb tagine, mmmmmmmmmmmmm!

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on October 23, 2010
at 07:01 PM

And I've got a whole tree full of fragrant and golden quinces in my frontyard and don't now what to do with them... Perhaps try to bake one or two in butter.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 23, 2010
at 04:06 PM

I wonder if you could make a "butter" in the crockpot with them http://coconutlime.blogspot.com/2010/10/stayman-winesap-apple-butter.html (omit the sugar) altough in Europe I never saw a crockpot

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4 Answers

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 23, 2010
at 06:58 PM

I think for most people without serious blood sugar issues, fruit in moderation is fine. They have some vitamin C which is nice, especially for those who do not eat a lot of liver. THey are natural and paleo, especially if yard grown. THey may have other benefits/nutrients/vitamins/antioxidents that are not yet discovered, as scientists are discovering new things all the time. But I would keep consumption to moderation because most fruit are much sweeter than in ancient times.

I sometimes do diced apples cooked in butter and cinnamon, which is very tasty. I might now try it with the Quince since we have a quince tree in our yard. I just didn't know what to do with them before now. Most people can them but that involves a ton of sugar. Nice to know they might taste good just cooked in butter! Thanx for the info.

2
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 23, 2010
at 08:16 AM

I've got 5 quince sitting in the kitchen now - planning on doing a quince and lamb tagine with some of them.

Pleased about the potassium!!

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on October 23, 2010
at 07:01 PM

And I've got a whole tree full of fragrant and golden quinces in my frontyard and don't now what to do with them... Perhaps try to bake one or two in butter.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 24, 2010
at 04:24 PM

Yeah, lamb tagine, mmmmmmmmmmmmm!

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on October 23, 2010
at 04:57 PM

A generic quince is no different from a generic apple or generic pear.

0
88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

on October 23, 2010
at 07:10 AM

In Dr. Kurt Harris's view, a piece of fruit is a bag of sugar. You are free to enjoy this interesting-sounding quince fruit, and it sounds less sweet than those others you mentioned, but it's never going to be a nutritionally dense (and therefore preferable) choice.

That said, Dr. Robert Lustig, who has sounded the alarm on sugar and HFCS, does not support the view that fruit = a bag of sugar. "Dr. Lustig has made quite clear that he does not consider fructose in fruit harmful and in his interview with Sean Croxton he said that he didn't know if there was an upper limit to safe fruit consumption but he suggested that it was probably impossible to overdose on fruit," reports Weston Price-affiliated blogger Chris Masterjohn.

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