7

votes

Is it good to eat sugar?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 26, 2012 at 7:23 PM

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=5498

Paul Jaminet compares PHD to Danny Roddy and compares Glucose, Fructose and Galactose's(dairy) ability to replenish liver glycogen and muscle glycogen.

Do you consume an intra or post workout simple carb source and what are your results? And very importantly - what is your 'exercise'?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on March 04, 2012
at 04:33 PM

How is your experiment going?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on January 29, 2012
at 04:57 AM

I think they're really cheap, what with all the diabetics around. Measuring the results is certainly a good idea, starting early to monitor a possible adjustment period.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:20 AM

trying to figure out how to eat my bodyweight in protein without eating eating a lot of fat while eating carbs is a royal pain in the ...

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Anyone have an extra glucometer and some strips I can use? Ill post all the results

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:14 AM

i dont have a meter

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on January 28, 2012
at 11:45 PM

If you're actually going to do this, I'd be curious to see the results of a glucometer, say every 15-30mins after you ingest said sucrose. :)

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 28, 2012
at 07:05 PM

Your stress hormones appear to be elevated, Jay. Please consider consuming a mixture of glucose and fructose in order to address this problem.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Pretty much any nutrition argument that starts off with a mechanistic argument is flawed (and ARROGANT). Travis, Cliff, Peat, we just don't know enough about how the body works to argue this way. There are 100,000 mechanistic studies showing how saturated fat causes CVD, yet they are all wrong. Why? Not because some other mechanistic study showed it - rather, simple observation that saturated fat does not cause CVD in people. So, start your arguments with observations. Poke holes in studies you think are flawed, but don't tell me about cortisol because you don't know shit about it.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 28, 2012
at 12:49 AM

I started today. In 30 days, Ill post the results.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 27, 2012
at 10:01 PM

This is a serious post btw.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:34 PM

To be honest, I was being generous in phrasing my original comment as a question. I don't need google when you get it so badly wrong, despite all your weak ad hominem responses to the contrary.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 27, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Actually no, I've gone quite a lot further than the wikipedia page, but everyone here seems to have a broken Google, so perhaps they should start on the wikipedia page while a mechanic is repairing their Google, and then once that's back up and running they can do some real research. If you read more than Willfully Ignorant Weekly, you would understand this.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on January 27, 2012
at 05:01 PM

PrimalDanny - wait. you didn't get the memo? that's ood. Yah. fyi. The only we do around here is look at wiki pages.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:01 AM

You've only just gone as far as reading the wiki page? Each to their own of course, but if I felt the need to medicate just to cope with the stress of waking up then I'd reckon I'd gone wrong somewhere.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:27 AM

@Cliff, I want the studies, and anything else you think I might find interesting, if you would be so generous to email me them, I thank you in advance.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:56 AM

"These results suggest that glucocorticoids play, in a tissue-specific manner, a role in the maintenance and/or production of insulin resistance produced by high-fat feeding." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7789638

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:36 AM

Pauls lack of knowledge on the subject is very telling. Maybe you should actually learn the ins and outs of a substance before you label it a poison.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:26 AM

@travis- Converting lactate to liver glycogen is anti-thyroid, this is why exercise is so antithyroid for most people. @Luckybastard- Where are the long term studies showing excess fructose is bad(what is excess?), I have a ton of studies showing the negatives effects PUFA(o3 and o6) have on glucose metabolism if you want to see them. Sugar does a lot more than lower your cortisol, it has many anti stress effects and normalizes many functions in the body when eaten in the right context. "Sucrose ingestion normalizes ADX rats- Adrenalectomy (ADX)"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11415998

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on January 26, 2012
at 11:34 PM

Travis, I don't understand your comment about heavy fructose + coconut. Care to elaborate?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 10:34 PM

Lucky: The wikipedia page for cortisol is fairly thorough. Its secretion is tied to circadian rhythm, so I doubt you could completely do away with it, nor would you necessarily want to, but I think continuing to fast from food or even just carbs after waking prolongs its secretion. Jack: Right you are. I'd have to see Ray Peat's serum triglycerides before I would advocate heavy fructose consumption all day long. It may not matter for people as active as we are, provided that we're not also consuming coconut etc.

21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on January 26, 2012
at 10:33 PM

I think Denise Minger tackled the 'wild fruit is barely sweet' claim quite successfully - http://rawfoodsos.com/2011/05/31/wild-and-ancient-fruit/

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:32 PM

Folks, where did Travis recommend to wake up and drink soda? He said he eats raw honey with a rice cake. I do too. Near as I can tell, he used "soda" as an example because he knows it's loaded with HFCS. I really doubt Travis would ever recommend drinking soda. Seems to me he was just using the nasty concoction as a "gasp" factor in example. Well, I guess it worked.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:03 PM

individual, then it probably does that for a reason. 2) are there any long-term studies of excess fructose effects on our biology that show it is benign without PUFAs? I've read that a few times but no one seems to have any studies supporting it that I've read. I guess those are the two main questions that spring to my mind...

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:02 PM

I interpreted your statement that way also, Travis. I actually made mental note of it when I saw that. And no, the amount of fructose that has been around as of the last 50-100 is historically higher than anything ever seen in nature. I guess from my non-scientific background I would have a few questions that I'm sure seem pretty elementary to some. 1) what has cortisol's role been in our biology? I have a feeling- like has happened with cholesterol, glucose, ketones, insulin and other bogeymen of the month- cortisol probably plays a vital role and if it spikes upon waking in a healthy

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Luckily, only people with poor reading comprehension would interpret it as such, so none of the noble personages who comprise the Paleo Hacks readership would be harmed.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:50 PM

Luckily, only people with poor reading comprehension would interpret it as such, so none of the lofty personages who comprise the Paleo Hacks readership would be harmed.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 26, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Casually tossing around what sounds a lot like advice to wake up and drink soda with zero ill effects seems very irresponsible to me.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 26, 2012
at 08:46 PM

"With many millions of years of exposure to this "poison," it seems we have evolved to take advantage of it." I disagree, it has not been around in the way it is today for longer than humans have been farmers. We cultivated fruits to become ever more sweet, and keep bees for honey, etc. Prior to agriculture, humans couldn't have stumbled upon a beehive that often, and wild fruit is barely sweet. I can't see how we would have evolved to eating so much sugar in the last ten thousand years or less.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:45 PM

And if you want to create muscle you need to (a) absorb protein; (b) have strong anabolic thyroid activity; (c) survive inflammatory stimuli and (d) be awake. All of which are greatly benefitted by the release of cortisol. Seems pretty reckless to me to try and mess with that, particularly over such non-concerns as gluconeogenesis.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:42 PM

Yeah, Kamal, I bought into that stuff completely at first, but it just doesn't make that much sense. The amount of sugar it takes to cause the problems that have been attributed to it is far in excess of what anyone eating an evolutionarily-consistent diet would really encounter. Even honey doesn't appear to have the predicted effect in vivo as would be expected, based on its composition. Incidentally, that's what I use for liver glycogen repletion in the morning.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:39 PM

It seems to me that most people want to create muscle, not catabolize it for glucose.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:38 PM

It's called "Sugar: The Bitter Truth". But paleo seems to have taken that and converted it to "Fructose Can Suck It". Some (e.g. Rosedale) are against any sugar, but it seems most practitioners are just wary of added sugar. Dose-response relationship, who's going to write a mega-post on this subject??

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:30 PM

There's nothing more paleo than a wolf at the door. Without coritsol I'd be dead, I'm not sure how you know that's what most people want.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:26 PM

Well, if you boil down Lustig's position, it'd likely be that kids shouldn't drink soda. I don't disagree. He clearly states that there's nothing wrong with fruit, so if the end result of his work is that fewer people consume HFCS, that'd likely be better for a lot of reasons. I don't doubt that fructose is damaging when constantly taken in heavy doses by a sedentary person.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Travis, do you hold Dr. Lustig Culp-able for fructose alarmism? (ha, see what I did there? Culp-able?) I haven't read enough primary studies to tell if it is truly alarmism, but I enjoy reading counter-arguments such as the one by Alan Aragon...http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2010/01/29/the-bitter-truth-about-fructose-alarmism/

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Cortisol is the wolf at the door. I dunno about the land of Atkins and fasting, but most people want to minimize catabolic stress hormones.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:11 PM

Hope no one ever was jerk enough to snatch your squeeze bottle while you were doing your squats or deadlifts :)

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Sorry, I was hoping you maybe had a link or something. I'd thought that maintaining natural cortisol cycles was best.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Not sure if serious.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 07:57 PM

Isn't cortisol secreted upon waking for a reason? I've not seen any reasons why you'd want to halt this.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 26, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Hi, Bill! I enjoyed Paul's article but I don't exercise enough for this to be an issue. I sweeten my coffee with honey, but other than that I don't eat many sugars or starches most days. My exercise is a good long walk so I don't require pre-, post-walk nutrition.

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9 Answers

8
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:32 AM

It would have been cool if paul actually took the time to read some of peats work and get a better idea of what he actually recommends and why he does. Instead he decided to focus on one very short blog post by danny that doesn't even necessarily provide a whole lot of info and the only references were from random blog commenters. He could have read and critiqued glycemia in context which has 20+ sources and maybe we would have actually learned something...

I think paul should do some more research before writing posts like these, he left out a lot of different critical factors that I cover in the comments. Specifically the glucose paradox.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:56 AM

"These results suggest that glucocorticoids play, in a tissue-specific manner, a role in the maintenance and/or production of insulin resistance produced by high-fat feeding." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7789638

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:36 AM

Pauls lack of knowledge on the subject is very telling. Maybe you should actually learn the ins and outs of a substance before you label it a poison.

7
Medium avatar

on January 26, 2012
at 07:40 PM

Well, he misconstrued my point a bit as I was simply stating that at a point of lowest liver glycogen, fructose is most beneficial and that a can of soda (which I would never actually drink) would be harmless if consumed at that point. If one's goal is to halt the secretion of cortisol ASAP upon waking and to ensure that the liver continues to convert T4 to T3 at its usual rate (which I presume to be based on liver glycogen levels) then the best route would be to rapidly replete liver glycogen upon waking. This is what I do.

Fructose isn't really needed during exercise because the Cori cycle is sending plenty of lactate to the liver for glycogenesis (probably a fair amount of alanine is making its way there as well due to muscle breakdown). As such, there's no need for further gluconeogenic precursors.

I guess all told this piece misses the mark, but I don't have any problem with the composition of PHD; I simply think the fear of fructose is overblown. With many millions of years of exposure to this "poison," it seems we have evolved to take advantage of it.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:30 PM

There's nothing more paleo than a wolf at the door. Without coritsol I'd be dead, I'm not sure how you know that's what most people want.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:27 AM

@Cliff, I want the studies, and anything else you think I might find interesting, if you would be so generous to email me them, I thank you in advance.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Travis, do you hold Dr. Lustig Culp-able for fructose alarmism? (ha, see what I did there? Culp-able?) I haven't read enough primary studies to tell if it is truly alarmism, but I enjoy reading counter-arguments such as the one by Alan Aragon...http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2010/01/29/the-bitter-truth-about-fructose-alarmism/

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:42 PM

Yeah, Kamal, I bought into that stuff completely at first, but it just doesn't make that much sense. The amount of sugar it takes to cause the problems that have been attributed to it is far in excess of what anyone eating an evolutionarily-consistent diet would really encounter. Even honey doesn't appear to have the predicted effect in vivo as would be expected, based on its composition. Incidentally, that's what I use for liver glycogen repletion in the morning.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Not sure if serious.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:39 PM

It seems to me that most people want to create muscle, not catabolize it for glucose.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Luckily, only people with poor reading comprehension would interpret it as such, so none of the noble personages who comprise the Paleo Hacks readership would be harmed.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Sorry, I was hoping you maybe had a link or something. I'd thought that maintaining natural cortisol cycles was best.

21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on January 26, 2012
at 10:33 PM

I think Denise Minger tackled the 'wild fruit is barely sweet' claim quite successfully - http://rawfoodsos.com/2011/05/31/wild-and-ancient-fruit/

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 26, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Casually tossing around what sounds a lot like advice to wake up and drink soda with zero ill effects seems very irresponsible to me.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on January 27, 2012
at 05:01 PM

PrimalDanny - wait. you didn't get the memo? that's ood. Yah. fyi. The only we do around here is look at wiki pages.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:32 PM

Folks, where did Travis recommend to wake up and drink soda? He said he eats raw honey with a rice cake. I do too. Near as I can tell, he used "soda" as an example because he knows it's loaded with HFCS. I really doubt Travis would ever recommend drinking soda. Seems to me he was just using the nasty concoction as a "gasp" factor in example. Well, I guess it worked.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:26 PM

Well, if you boil down Lustig's position, it'd likely be that kids shouldn't drink soda. I don't disagree. He clearly states that there's nothing wrong with fruit, so if the end result of his work is that fewer people consume HFCS, that'd likely be better for a lot of reasons. I don't doubt that fructose is damaging when constantly taken in heavy doses by a sedentary person.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:02 PM

I interpreted your statement that way also, Travis. I actually made mental note of it when I saw that. And no, the amount of fructose that has been around as of the last 50-100 is historically higher than anything ever seen in nature. I guess from my non-scientific background I would have a few questions that I'm sure seem pretty elementary to some. 1) what has cortisol's role been in our biology? I have a feeling- like has happened with cholesterol, glucose, ketones, insulin and other bogeymen of the month- cortisol probably plays a vital role and if it spikes upon waking in a healthy

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 07:57 PM

Isn't cortisol secreted upon waking for a reason? I've not seen any reasons why you'd want to halt this.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:50 PM

Luckily, only people with poor reading comprehension would interpret it as such, so none of the lofty personages who comprise the Paleo Hacks readership would be harmed.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:26 AM

@travis- Converting lactate to liver glycogen is anti-thyroid, this is why exercise is so antithyroid for most people. @Luckybastard- Where are the long term studies showing excess fructose is bad(what is excess?), I have a ton of studies showing the negatives effects PUFA(o3 and o6) have on glucose metabolism if you want to see them. Sugar does a lot more than lower your cortisol, it has many anti stress effects and normalizes many functions in the body when eaten in the right context. "Sucrose ingestion normalizes ADX rats- Adrenalectomy (ADX)"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11415998

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:01 AM

You've only just gone as far as reading the wiki page? Each to their own of course, but if I felt the need to medicate just to cope with the stress of waking up then I'd reckon I'd gone wrong somewhere.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:38 PM

It's called "Sugar: The Bitter Truth". But paleo seems to have taken that and converted it to "Fructose Can Suck It". Some (e.g. Rosedale) are against any sugar, but it seems most practitioners are just wary of added sugar. Dose-response relationship, who's going to write a mega-post on this subject??

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 10:34 PM

Lucky: The wikipedia page for cortisol is fairly thorough. Its secretion is tied to circadian rhythm, so I doubt you could completely do away with it, nor would you necessarily want to, but I think continuing to fast from food or even just carbs after waking prolongs its secretion. Jack: Right you are. I'd have to see Ray Peat's serum triglycerides before I would advocate heavy fructose consumption all day long. It may not matter for people as active as we are, provided that we're not also consuming coconut etc.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Cortisol is the wolf at the door. I dunno about the land of Atkins and fasting, but most people want to minimize catabolic stress hormones.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:45 PM

And if you want to create muscle you need to (a) absorb protein; (b) have strong anabolic thyroid activity; (c) survive inflammatory stimuli and (d) be awake. All of which are greatly benefitted by the release of cortisol. Seems pretty reckless to me to try and mess with that, particularly over such non-concerns as gluconeogenesis.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 26, 2012
at 08:46 PM

"With many millions of years of exposure to this "poison," it seems we have evolved to take advantage of it." I disagree, it has not been around in the way it is today for longer than humans have been farmers. We cultivated fruits to become ever more sweet, and keep bees for honey, etc. Prior to agriculture, humans couldn't have stumbled upon a beehive that often, and wild fruit is barely sweet. I can't see how we would have evolved to eating so much sugar in the last ten thousand years or less.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:03 PM

individual, then it probably does that for a reason. 2) are there any long-term studies of excess fructose effects on our biology that show it is benign without PUFAs? I've read that a few times but no one seems to have any studies supporting it that I've read. I guess those are the two main questions that spring to my mind...

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on January 26, 2012
at 11:34 PM

Travis, I don't understand your comment about heavy fructose + coconut. Care to elaborate?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 27, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Actually no, I've gone quite a lot further than the wikipedia page, but everyone here seems to have a broken Google, so perhaps they should start on the wikipedia page while a mechanic is repairing their Google, and then once that's back up and running they can do some real research. If you read more than Willfully Ignorant Weekly, you would understand this.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:34 PM

To be honest, I was being generous in phrasing my original comment as a question. I don't need google when you get it so badly wrong, despite all your weak ad hominem responses to the contrary.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Pretty much any nutrition argument that starts off with a mechanistic argument is flawed (and ARROGANT). Travis, Cliff, Peat, we just don't know enough about how the body works to argue this way. There are 100,000 mechanistic studies showing how saturated fat causes CVD, yet they are all wrong. Why? Not because some other mechanistic study showed it - rather, simple observation that saturated fat does not cause CVD in people. So, start your arguments with observations. Poke holes in studies you think are flawed, but don't tell me about cortisol because you don't know shit about it.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 28, 2012
at 07:05 PM

Your stress hormones appear to be elevated, Jay. Please consider consuming a mixture of glucose and fructose in order to address this problem.

4
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 26, 2012
at 09:05 PM

As usual, Paul is more patient than I would be. A very classy (and smart) guy!

3
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 27, 2012
at 03:49 AM

@Cliff

Ok, am I to understand that if I start with a blank slate tomorrow and I consume sucrose for fuel instead of fats. Lets see, 180grams protein = 720 cals. 40 grams of saturated fat = 360, protein+fat = 1100 rounded calories. So... if I consume aprox 250 grams carbs from sucrose or honey or orange juice (BUT NOT white rice, white potato) for another 1000 calories <---- this will be a positive thing?

Ill continue to walk 1hr/day 4/week with 50lb ruck sack. And will continue to weight train 3x/week.

IF I am following correctly, the above should have me losing BF while increasing LBM while normalizing or optimally regulating cortisol and a whole host of other things.

Ill sacrifice my body for science just to see what happens, but I need Cliffs input.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 27, 2012
at 10:01 PM

This is a serious post btw.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on January 28, 2012
at 11:45 PM

If you're actually going to do this, I'd be curious to see the results of a glucometer, say every 15-30mins after you ingest said sucrose. :)

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 28, 2012
at 12:49 AM

I started today. In 30 days, Ill post the results.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Anyone have an extra glucometer and some strips I can use? Ill post all the results

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:14 AM

i dont have a meter

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 29, 2012
at 03:20 AM

trying to figure out how to eat my bodyweight in protein without eating eating a lot of fat while eating carbs is a royal pain in the ...

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on January 29, 2012
at 04:57 AM

I think they're really cheap, what with all the diabetics around. Measuring the results is certainly a good idea, starting early to monitor a possible adjustment period.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on March 04, 2012
at 04:33 PM

How is your experiment going?

2
1e36119906da54831601a7c23674f581

(698)

on January 28, 2012
at 02:50 AM

I am completely confused..

2
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on January 26, 2012
at 07:34 PM

My main criteria is how soon I intend to workout again. Most of my exercise is within my aerobic capacity, and unless I'm fully fasted (24+hrs) I don't find myself reaching depletion. My more intense exercise doesn't last long enough for that to be an issue either.

Sometimes I feel like eating PWO, though I'm not necessarily going for simple carbs and there doesn't seem to be an obvious pattern as to what my body wants. Whatever I do, I seem to be faster and stronger next time around.

1
2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on January 27, 2012
at 11:30 PM

Whatever happened to blood sugar and hormonal spikes wrecking health? To gluconeogenesis? To muscle fueled by fat? Measuring blood sugar spikes after high GI meals will tell you where you stand.

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 27, 2012
at 01:54 AM

I don't understand how a human can consume 1 Pound of Pure Dry Sugar, and only refill liver glycogen 20-60 grams. Hmmmmmm, might have something to do with refilling of muscle glycogen? (and burning of course)<--another reason to eat carbs at bed time, OR faulty study data?.

Paul "Muscle glycogen replenishment is maximized with a carbohydrate intake of 100 calories per hour." ok, so 25 grams/hr to replenish muscle glycogen? <-- where is this proved in the studies? I just don't see it.

Anyone know HOW they depleted just these guys livers glycogen without taking into consideration all the lactic acid conversion to glucose surely taking place?

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on January 26, 2012
at 07:31 PM

IIRC simple honey is 50/50 glucose/fructose.

Back in the day, I used to eat a tablespoon or two of honey post-workout because my workouts were long, aggressive, and left me very lightheaded. This was usually Olympic Lifting, followed by 1-2 specifically strength-related movements (i.e. clean and jerks followed by squats, snatches followed by deadlifts). Honey was just about perfect because I could keep a squeeze bottle in my gymbag (without fear of it going bad), it was a whole food, and it seemed to work well.

That being said, I don't workout to that extent anymore so I've lost the need for it. And I have been doing too much DeVany reading lately so I avoid any calories for an hour or so after I train.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on January 26, 2012
at 08:11 PM

Hope no one ever was jerk enough to snatch your squeeze bottle while you were doing your squats or deadlifts :)

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