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Hidden sources of sucrose and fructose?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 06, 2013 at 5:50 PM

And I am not talking about reading ingredient labels.

I am wondering if there are foods other than fruits and sweet veggies that contain sugar. For instance, looking at sources of starch, such as tubers, do they have sugar? Obviously sweet potatoes have a little sugar, but do white potatoes/taro/ have sugar, or only starch? Do grains have sugar, or are they only starch? What about pseudograins like buckwheat and quinoa? What about eating the liver of factory farmed animals with NAFLD?

Can anyone shed light on little-known sources of sugar?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on April 07, 2013
at 04:38 AM

Important to remember also that the longer it cooks the simpler the sugars will be (baked sweet potat vs gently boiled...)

77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on April 07, 2013
at 12:12 AM

look out! the sugar's goin' get you!

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2 Answers

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Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 06, 2013
at 06:36 PM

You should realize that starch is just a long chain of glucose molecules.

For a PH member, I eat a lot of carbohydrates - 100-250g most days with jumps up to 350g some days. I'm very active. Without starchy roots and tubers (as well as ones that are more sugary than starchy, like carrots and beets), I would be a wreck. Delivering slow and fast glucose (as starch and sugar) to my body has helped me bulk up muscle, and fuel exercise.

So, if you are literally only curious about pure sugar in foods (and not the nutrients the body breaks the food down into), then yes: there is sugar in nearly everything. Even the most starchy of starchy roots (e.g. yuca / cassava) still have an iota of sugar. If you are curious about this for dietary purposes, then I suggest you continue to research - I think you need to understand what starch actually is. :-) It's not great, but the wikipedia article on it is a good start - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starch .

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on April 07, 2013
at 04:38 AM

Important to remember also that the longer it cooks the simpler the sugars will be (baked sweet potat vs gently boiled...)

0
A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on April 06, 2013
at 05:58 PM

Feel free to use website like this whenever you want to know anything about the nutritional content of food: http://nutritiondata.self.com/

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