3

votes

Fructose/pufa stufy

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 24, 2012 at 6:41 PM

http://archive.samj.org.za/1971%20VOL%20XLV%20Jan-Jun/Articles/02%20February/3.2%20SOME%20PSYCHOLOGICAL%20EFFECTS%20OF%20A%20MAINLY%20FRUIT%20DIET%20IN%20MAN,%20B.J.%20Meyer,%20M.%20van%20der%20Merwe,%20D.G.%20.pdf

"The diet was pl anned to ensur e a mlD1mum int ake of 2400 calories and 50 g of prot e in pe r day. To compens a t e for the high satiety value of f rui t the di e t wa s suppl ement ed by 70 g of nuts. The high- f a t cont ent of nut s and avoc ados enabled mos t of the pa r t i c ipant s to consume the r e commended numbe r of calories; some subjects consumed considerably mor e calories than the minimum numbe r requested"

the diet was purposefully excessive, HIGH in fructose and also fat sourced through PUFAs, nuts, avocados, and peanuts...

anyone want to hack at the results?

"A high- f ruc tos e di e t produc ed only a t r ans i ent inc r e a s e in ur ina ry output , while suc ros e had no effect. I t should also be ment ioned tha t diets whi ch f avour weight loss, gene r a l ly produc e an initial loss in weight l a rge ly due to loss in body wa t c r . Ac cording to Da lde rup e t al . " the f a e c a l excretion of their anima l s on a high-monos a c cha r ide or di s a c cha r ide diet decreased. Thi s is in sha rp cOntrast wi th the expe r i enc e of our subjects. The di s c r epancy is probably due to the difference in the diets consumed by the anima l s of Da lde rup e t al.)' and our subjects. In the case of the human- type diet suppl i ed to the anima l s the c a rbohydr a t e cont ent of the di e t was r a i s ed by adding iso-calorically 15% refined monos a c cha r ide or di s a c cha r ide to the diet, while in the pr e s ent expe r iment the subj e c t s consumed the suga r s in the na tur a l form toge the r wi th l a rge quant i t i e s of c rude fibre. The di e t also had a high f a t cont ent , and cont a ined a cons ide r abl e amount of pot a s s ium.

None of the subjects experienced any ill-effects. In general, the ment a l patients did very well on the diet. The i r int e rpe r sona l relationships, co-operativeness and int e r e s t in the i r sur roundings we r e excellent.

d a s f rui t juice. In designing the di e t for the proj e c t the daily di e t consumed by the single volunteer s e rved as guideline. He r minimum daily diet a t the time consisted of 450 g of avocado, any othe r available fruit, and about 30 g of nuts. For the purpose of the project thi s diet was adjusted so as to supply a minimum of 2 400 calories, 50 g protein, 0??5 g calcium, and adequa t e amount s of i ron and vitamins pe r day. At least 20% of the calories had to be supplied as f a t so a s to ensur e adequa t e int ake of calories, essential fatty acids, and fat-soluble vitamins. Every subject had to e a t a minimum of 450 g of avoc ado per day to ensur e an adequa t e intake of calories, f a t and protein. In addi t ion the f a t s in avoc ado a r e highly uns a tur a t ed. In general fruit is low in proteins and f a t s and has a high satiety value. To comply wi th the requisites outlined, subjects were allowed to supplement the i r di e t by 70 g of nut s pe r day. The Bantu SUbjects a t e only peanuts while the othe r subjects a t e also cashew nut s and wa lnut s in similar quantities. Coconut was allowed, but only one subject ate sma l l quantities. The subjects could also e a t toma toe s , carrots, cucumbers and lettuce. Coffee and tea with suga r but wi thout milk we r e allowed. No restrictions were put on sugar, honey and salt."

00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on March 03, 2012
at 07:03 AM

Technically yes, avocados are a fruit. So are coconuts. But neither is what most people think of when they think of a "mainly fruit diet", and neither has meaningful amounts of fructose compared to sweet fruit.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 26, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Mallory, you should fix the spacing; this is so difficult to read I don't think many people will bother!

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 25, 2012
at 06:02 PM

I agree with peter.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on February 25, 2012
at 12:02 PM

And this is a lazy answer :D.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on February 25, 2012
at 09:23 AM

"This wasn't a "mainly fruit diet", it was a "mainly avocado diet" Technically, avocado is a fruit.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 25, 2012
at 06:26 AM

sloppy question

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on February 24, 2012
at 11:23 PM

wow...that one old arse study :)

Af005ec9a8e028f2b04bf5367b64e0d6

(2797)

on February 24, 2012
at 10:23 PM

"Coconut was allowed, but only one subject ate small quantities."

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on February 24, 2012
at 09:08 PM

I'm thinking she cut and pasted from a PDF.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 24, 2012
at 07:20 PM

What's with the crazy spacing in the quotes?

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2 Answers

5
00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on February 24, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Note the following facts about the "all-fruit diet" they were eating:

"Every subject had to eat a minimum of 450g of avocado per day to ensure an adequate intake of calories, fat, and protein." That's over a pound of avocado, or more than two typical Hass avocados.

"To compensate for the high satiety value of fruit, the diet was supplemented by 70g of nuts."

Result: the diets averaged 40% fat! 110g of fat per day...

...but even two avocados and 70g of peanuts only gets you part of the way there. What else were they eating to get all the way to 110g of fat per day?

Table II provides the answer: they were also eating coconut and green olives.

This wasn't a "mainly fruit diet", it was a "mainly avocado diet"...plus nuts, coconuts, and green olives, in addition to what we think of as "fruit".

Finally, of the nine Bantu subjects, four gained weight and five lost weight, net, over the entire 24 weeks. (See Fig. 1.) Everyone lost weight over the first six weeks, but almost half started gaining relentlessly and ended up with a net gain. And over half were steadily gaining weight at the end of 24 weeks.

The whites did better...but three who were starting to gain weight dropped out after 12 weeks, and would probably have ended up with a net gain. All but two who completed the 24 weeks were on a gaining trend.

In short, the study doesn't show what it claims to show.

JS

Af005ec9a8e028f2b04bf5367b64e0d6

(2797)

on February 24, 2012
at 10:23 PM

"Coconut was allowed, but only one subject ate small quantities."

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on February 25, 2012
at 09:23 AM

"This wasn't a "mainly fruit diet", it was a "mainly avocado diet" Technically, avocado is a fruit.

00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on March 03, 2012
at 07:03 AM

Technically yes, avocados are a fruit. So are coconuts. But neither is what most people think of when they think of a "mainly fruit diet", and neither has meaningful amounts of fructose compared to sweet fruit.

2
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on February 25, 2012
at 09:23 AM

This is a lazy question. What exactly are you asking?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on February 25, 2012
at 12:02 PM

And this is a lazy answer :D.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 25, 2012
at 06:02 PM

I agree with peter.

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