1

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Buying frozen grass-fed beef

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 20, 2011 at 6:39 PM

I have the opportunity to buy some grass-fed beef from a local provider that I just found out about. It's less expensive than what I normally find online, but the downside (as I see it) is that this is some leftover beef from last fall that has been frozen since around October. When I look online, most sites say that beef starts going bad after 3-6 months if it is frozen. Is that accurate? What actually happens to beef that is frozen? Is it different between grass-fed and grain-fed? What do you think? Should I consider buying it? If not, why not. Thanks!

3960d381831b80ad96164f34e2ab6030

(565)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:58 PM

Yeah, the person I talked to over the phone told me it was the meat leftover from last fall. That's also why it's cheaper since meat in general was cheaper last fall.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 20, 2011
at 10:11 PM

And don't forget to invite all of us!

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:05 PM

If you're having a solstice feast, don't forget the mead (and a drinking horn).

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3 Answers

best answer

1
254ea62982c287995e11bc3cfd629407

(822)

on June 20, 2011
at 06:46 PM

A lot of it will depend on how it's packaged. Honestly, what you're basically looking for is anything that is freezer burnt, not necessarily that it would spoil due to pathogens.

Anything cryo-sealed, you should be fine. Even meat that is butcher packaged (i.e. paper) should be ok if there hasn't been a significant fluctuation in temp and moisture to settle on the meat and re-freeze.

If you're worried about the length of time, see if you can get some kind of guarantee to quality, like the ability to get your money back if you do find anything burnt or otherwise distasteful.

4
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on June 20, 2011
at 07:07 PM

If it was wrapped well (either vacuum packed or wrapped in plastic wrap and then paper) and was kept frozen at a low temp without much variance (typical freezer) then it should be ok to eat. It will be a little tougher/drier and a little lower in nutrients than fresh meat, but should be fine. I've had beef or pork sitting in the freezer for a year that I ate and was fine.

If you're going to buy a bunch of it and it's then going to sit in YOUR freezer for 3-6 months, it'll be getting pretty old by the time you eat it, but hey if it's cheap and grass fed I'd do it. Invite some friends over and have a solstice feast.

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:05 PM

If you're having a solstice feast, don't forget the mead (and a drinking horn).

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 20, 2011
at 10:11 PM

And don't forget to invite all of us!

0
E1c6e8005795364ef33867073e5d4ec1

(109)

on June 20, 2011
at 08:17 PM

Do you know for certain that it is old? I buy grass fed meats all the time through a co-op I belong to, directly from a farm, and they always deliver the meats frozen. They do this as it is too expensive for them to buy a refrigerated truck. Even at our local farm markets the farmers bring their meats frozen. The meats are frozen just after they are processed and the quality is always very good.

3960d381831b80ad96164f34e2ab6030

(565)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:58 PM

Yeah, the person I talked to over the phone told me it was the meat leftover from last fall. That's also why it's cheaper since meat in general was cheaper last fall.

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