2

votes

The chicken or the egg...if you can only afford to get one free range/soy free etc but need both in your diet which would you choose to buy standard?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 02, 2013 at 5:17 AM

A free range off the farm soy free chicken is between 21-27$ around here at 5$ and change a pound.

A dozen soy free free range eggs is 8$.

We generally eat one chicken per week and use the carcass to make broth for soup which is also made once a week. We go through probably 3 dozen eggs. So we need both.

At the regular store a chicken is 5-6$ for standard, 10$ for free range but still grain fed with who knows what.

A dozen battery farm eggs are 1.39 and 5$ for free range grain fed.

So household economy wise Im kind of at a loss. The chicken or the egg?

*ethically I would lean torwards the chicken but this question is regarding nutrition.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on June 02, 2013
at 06:00 PM

I dont care overly much for the meat but the broth is second to none.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on June 02, 2013
at 05:00 PM

+1 for "crappy, bland, flavorless." In addition to the sound advice.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2013
at 04:48 PM

Animals don't store toxins, let alone in the skin and bones.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 02, 2013
at 01:22 PM

I agree, I don't eat much chicken, I'm more of a beef connoisseur.

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7 Answers

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2013
at 12:21 PM

Oh overpriced paleo food...

Eggs: omega-3 eggs, as Stephen points out, are cheap. $3 a dozen at most. Better than going straight conventional. However, I see signs everywhere in my area about eggs for sale from "backyard" flocks. $2 a dozen, these aren't battery chickens, they're probably outside, scratching around in the dirt, getting sun, and being fed some random chicken feed. Probably better than the omega-3 eggs too.

Chickens: Just stop eating chicken. It's crappy meat, bland and flavorless. Conventional birds are raised in terrible conditions.

In the end, neither are so superior in nutrition to justify that premium price.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on June 02, 2013
at 06:00 PM

I dont care overly much for the meat but the broth is second to none.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on June 02, 2013
at 05:00 PM

+1 for "crappy, bland, flavorless." In addition to the sound advice.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 02, 2013
at 01:22 PM

I agree, I don't eat much chicken, I'm more of a beef connoisseur.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 02, 2013
at 11:51 AM

I can get o3 eggs at Kroger for 2.49/dz here in Ga. I'd buy both standard tbh and just buy 2-4 times as much :())

2
374925bd0c30305e4027c25e8815b298

(113)

on June 02, 2013
at 01:34 PM

Halfway with Matt. I've read up that omega 3 egg producers use horrible, rancid sources for the added omega 3. Being cynical as I am in regards to big food, it wouldn't surprise me if that was true. But yeah, judging from a purely culinary aspect, conventional chickens just aren't worth the pufa.

2
76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

on June 02, 2013
at 05:55 AM

I personally would go with the best eggs possible, I'd eat more of them, and to me, they're more versatile with a better fat makeup.

The chicken if you really can't find anything that has no hormones and what not; you can if you're worried, remove the skin to lesson some of the Omega 6 as well???.

Just my off the hip thought anyway! I'm sure you'll read a few counter arguments.

Truth.

1
7b52f5427156ffc6c519564d1679e84c

on June 03, 2013
at 03:59 AM

I buy pastured stewing hens, the retired egg layers. 2 for ten dollars from a local farmer who also produces pastured lamb. Their organic young hens are about $20 so i think this is a good deal. Slow cook for a while then remove the meat, put bones and skin in pressure cooker for round two. Has to be better than commercial chicken. I also buy my eggs from them, 4 t 6 dollars a dozen depending on size. Helps ensure there will be stewing hens for the next year.

1
4856eae0511e116135bba0acc3e42ce5

on June 02, 2013
at 03:10 PM

do you have any farms nearby? eggs keep in the fridge for a month. we have a community of people here who all take turns picking the eggs up at the farm and we buy them for a wholesale price. also worth talking to a chicken farmer about buying bulk whole chickens. but...until then... if you are using the carcass for broth and you have to choose one or the other i would go with the cleaner chicken since the toxins are stored in skin and bones.
although, i think if i had to choose either or i would start looking for a more affordable directly sourced alternative and cut down on eggs/chicken until then. although, as a family who eats almost a dozen eggs a day...it's easy to say 'cut back' but i know it would be almost impossible for us to actually do!
if you decide not to buy the clean chickens sometimes butchers will give you bones for free. you could ask to see if there are any free pastured bones. or ask a friend who buys pastured meat who doesn't make broth if you could have their bones. it's worth asking. i'd only ever use pastured animals for broth. it's so hard to decide how to juggle buying real food and balancing the checkbook!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2013
at 04:48 PM

Animals don't store toxins, let alone in the skin and bones.

1
9fea74f20474786fdf27781990556570

on June 02, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I think you're okay buying regular eggs if pastured eggs are cost prohibitive. Chickens are filtering things as protection for their chick. I wouldn't waste money on omega 3 eggs. However, nothing is going to beat a pastured egg with their lovely, dark yolks!

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