6

votes

How many people on here are from the United Kingdom?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 24, 2010 at 5:22 PM

There are a lot of North American folks around. How many here are based in the British Isles?

If so are there any differences you can see about eating well in the UK? Compared to say a lot of the disscusions on here about US farming, meats, shops and foods.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 05, 2011
at 12:00 PM

Hang on, breakfast heritage? The Full English is the epitome paleo - if you skip the fried bread of course. Breakfast cereals are very much a US invention and it is just as bad over here, except now it's all about fibre (and occasionally protein) to keep kids full so they don't get distracted by their ravenous hunger. Cereal with as much protein as an egg? Why not just eat an egg?!

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 11, 2011
at 09:09 PM

Ah, beans on toast... That was one thing that I really enjoyed pre-Paleo, very much comfort food! Where are you from, jessyannb? Wow thank you so much for mentioning Abel and Cole, I had never heard of them before, have just Googled their site - I will see if they deliver in my area, would be fantastic! All I pretty much eat is meat and veg anyway so it would be ideal. I wish I could 'upvote' you a million times for giving me this tip! :) Thank you!!

F42e0775218d2c88fcb1869f3b7ea58e

(130)

on November 10, 2011
at 09:36 AM

I know what you mean about the sandwich culture. Also, the thing I found so weird when I first moved here: beans on toast! I honestly cannot tell you how much I rate Abel and Cole. I get a veg box from them every week and lots of meat from them, and their stuff is always awesome and their service is so great. Also, I blame Paul McCartney for the whole vegetarian thing.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:37 PM

Great, now I need to find another source of grass fed meat (sigh)! Do any other British supermarkets sell completely grass fed meat? I've never shopped at Whole Foods, do they sell meat?

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:07 AM

Quote: "Our essential Waitrose British beef comes from prime cattle, from both native and continental breeds, that are fed a healthy grass and cereal-based diet."

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:06 AM

I know Waitrose "Essential" beef is grain finished. The site says it: http://www.waitrose.com/home/inspiration/About_our_product_ranges/food/meat/beef.html

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:51 PM

I'd bet Waitrose beef gets fed some grain unless stated otherwise, they'd still be mostly grass-fed though. I seen M&S aberdeen angus beef with "grain-fed" as a selling point on the label.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:48 PM

I love Edinburgh, lived there for the last 4 years. I'm now living in Aberdeen which is a long way from anywhere.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:12 PM

Hi Sean - I'm not actually sure to be honest. I will check the next time I'm in the supermarket. That's frustrating if it's grain finished, and if it is, I obviously need to read food labels more thoroughly.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:27 PM

That's the whole of England :P

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:25 PM

Are Waitrose's aberdeen angus beef grass finished? I can't find any evidence of that. For their "essential Waitrose" product they state that it is grass fed and grain finished.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:03 PM

Ah I remember fondly the last time I ate cereal... I had been Paleo for about 3 months and had some non-Paleo guests to stay. They had Cheerios for breakfast so I thought 'Why not' and had a bowl with coconut milk. I think to say that I thought I was going to die afterwards is an understatement. I thought I was going to vomit and got really bad shakes, my arms and legs went totally weak and I had a horrible pressure feeling in my head. Never, ever, ever again!

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 07:58 PM

Hello Matthew :) How's all in Scotland? I have a friend who lives in Edinburgh and adores it - What part do you live in?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:26 PM

How can you get through the day without a bowl of sugar coated cereal?!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:21 PM

Hello from Scotland :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:20 PM

Good job finding a lamb shoulder a that price, they are very tasty.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Ah Pret.... Sandwich lovers heaven! The sandwiches all look so good, but the thoughts of actually physically eating one never crosses my mind. With regards to buying produce, I think that someone may have already posted about Notting Hill farmers markets. I've never investigated purchasing produce from there but will certainly look into it. British breakfast heritage generally consists of coffee and pastries (but I guess that's the norm everywhere these days), or MacDonalds breakfast - Vile! Even watching my colleagues eating bowls of Special K every morning makes me feel unwell.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on September 16, 2011
at 05:54 PM

It's probably a factor. You can't imagine my shock/horror when I first saw adverts for medicines online. That said it's not as though we're a statin-free wonderland. My grandmother has innumerable health woes due to being a diabetic who only eats sugar and due to her statins, but still their only concern is making sure her cholesterol is low enough. As it happens her cholesterol was never high (by any standards anyway), but she still had a stroke, to her doctor's utter confusion.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 16, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Is it because you don't have television advertisements for pharmaceuticals like statins?

Dc8ec73989c7b37c006f2031dd648a61

on July 04, 2011
at 06:38 PM

haha, indeed... everytime I mention to someone about what I eat the first thing they say 90% of the time is "YOU DON'T EAT BREAD? WHAT THE HELL DO YOU EAT THEN" :)

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on June 24, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Hutch - Agreed completely. The community isn't here yet.

51c2cdd55bf287026db68cf31a6d0a0b

on June 24, 2011
at 12:01 PM

I am British and from the Bedfordshire area, lots of countryside, farmland and farm shops selling quality products. We have a few organisations here too that promote local produce and 'proper' food that help us source the products we prefer, plus the markets here are great for all sorts of foods as the population is diverse. Are any of you on Twitter? You can follow me @hutch_pr. I don't always talking about Paleo but it'd be great to have some Brits I can share ideas with and chat too about the hurdles Brits face. Paul.

51c2cdd55bf287026db68cf31a6d0a0b

on June 24, 2011
at 11:54 AM

I agree with many of these but would also add a negative that the Paleo lifestyle in the UK does not seem to be well organised at the moment across the UK not just London, however that is changing thanks to posts like this! You do comment on meat being more expensive here, but then that is down to the quality of UK meat being generally better - which is a positive too. :)

B6729a6379ad1d5e0a682aa7b3365030

(35)

on March 18, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Hi Sean! I'm living in Uxbridge, and usually head to Ealing once a week. Any tips on local paleo-friendly establishments/activities in the area? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:23 PM

I think war time rationing had a big effect on British diet. Our parents lived 15 years of rationing (only Holland suffered more). I think this makes the British more adaptable than most, you don't have to go so far back.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 10, 2011
at 04:14 PM

There is no raw milk directive in the EU. Actually in the last year or two the vending machines with raw milk have become real popular in Slovenia and Italy.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 10, 2011
at 12:46 PM

I can buy raw milk in my local farmer's market (about 3 minute's walk away). It's in a peculiar sort of vending machine too, not hidden behind the counter, which you have to ask for in code.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 10, 2011
at 10:29 AM

I took some droewors hiking- not as dry as biltong but they lasted the 10 days easily and were much easier to eat.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 10, 2011
at 09:06 AM

Will do :) Got a meeting with the website guy in a couple of weeks.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 09, 2011
at 10:06 PM

keep us updated on a UK version of this, good idea!

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 09, 2011
at 10:02 PM

good points, not europe in general I want to add on all the points

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:25 PM

Hang on, I though raw milk is illegal in the EU? It is in Ireland.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:11 PM

By the way, I live mostly off of supermarkets. Lamb from there is generally of very high quality and cheaper than what you find in the weekend markets.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:09 PM

I'm also in West London (Ealing) but work out in the Hayes and Uxbridge area.

B6729a6379ad1d5e0a682aa7b3365030

(35)

on March 09, 2011
at 08:47 PM

Oops, I forgot to mention this. I've found that the little independent cash-and-carries are great for low prices on coconut oil, almond flour, nuts, eggs, and ghee. Definitely helpful for my Uni budget!

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on January 26, 2011
at 04:52 PM

Not that I dislike the coconut taste, I love it! Sometimes it's not appropriate though :D

D42a1f9a7a687e5354cc362d50bced56

(80)

on November 02, 2010
at 09:31 AM

I'd heartily recommend Notting Hill farmers market on Saturdays. As you said they've got organic pastured meat at reasonable prices and raw jersey (A2) milk and dairy if your into it. I've tried the Marylebone market before, they had a better selection of game and offal but the prices where much higher so I've not been back.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 27, 2010
at 07:59 PM

Happy to see this farmer mentioning Weston A. Price and the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation. Could be a marketing ploy, but unlikely. Quote from their site: "Healthy Soil = Healthy Grass = Healthy Animals = Healthy Meat & Milk = Healthy People!"

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 25, 2010
at 03:16 PM

You've got your first 'Likes' on the page.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 25, 2010
at 03:13 PM

CT - Yeah. Many safa (South Africans) friends have mentioned and shared biltong and droewors. Most of what I've found isn't labeled or is sugar and nitrate packed. But now I'll start the search for good stuff. Thanks for the reminder.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 25, 2010
at 01:04 PM

Very good points. Have you tried biltong? Very similar to jerky

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Almost all UK cattle is kept on grass for most of the year, how much supplemental feed they get varies. It's hard to sell beef as "a bit more grass-fed than the rest".

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Have you tried Borough Market? Some very specialist meat retailers there.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:57 PM

Almost all UK cattle is kept on grass for most of the year, how much supplemental feed they get varies. Its hard to sell beef as "slightly more grass-fed than the rest".

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:28 PM

Don't think there is a market for it just yet. Hope the market grows though - It is getting tiring reading all the small print. Spent a good 5 minutes look for nitrate-free bacon (to no avail)!

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:40 PM

How do you do bewilder. I love the Duchy range (Prince Charles sold out to Waitrose last year). Very glad to hear their meat is grass fed. But why don't they advertise it more?

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:31 PM

Quick addition to the above: "Organic cattle have to be fed a minimum of 60 per cent forage" http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/7138035/The-Kitchen-Thinker-corn-fed-cows.html

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:20 PM

How do. I'm UK based as well (London). I read in some comments at Mark's Daily Apple that most UK cattle are grass fed but can't find anything to confirm that. Waitrose's new organic brand (Duchy) states that their beef and lamb is grass fed. That currently makes up most of my meat purchases. Some supermarkets occasionally carry less conventional meats like venison, buffalo (burger) and rabbit.

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23 Answers

7
B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 25, 2010
at 12:25 AM

View from a southern boy (Louisiana and Texas) living in London.

Positives for the UK:

  • Most dairy is pastured. No hunting for KerryGold. And cream is much better. Though raw milk is hard to come by.
  • If you do cheese, and I do, moving to the UK and Europe is a life changing experience. US cheese is awful.
  • Grocery store meat is generally of better quality. All about the lamb for me.
  • Less aversions to offal and odd pieces of meat. Liver and kidney is very common and nice cuts like ox cheek are fairly easy to come by.
  • The cities are filled with green space. Never lost in a concrete jungle.
  • More holiday and focus on living.
  • People don't seem as finicky about smelly food. Like canned fish. It's quite common to see people with canned sardines and mackerel around the office.
  • Lots of lamb. I rarely experienced lamb in the southern US.
  • Eggs are stored properly in grocery stores. Not in the fridge like most places in the US do.
  • They don't mind smelly food here. I've seen people in meetings with mackerel/sardines. If I dared open sardines in a US office, the whole place would start staring at me.

Negatives for the UK:

  • Not an active paleo/primal/... community.
  • I want some nitrate free bacon and cured meats. Please!
  • Very poor labelling of food products.
  • Cost! Meat isn't cheap. And I haven't been able to find the cheaper beef roasts I like. (Though lamb roasts here are much better than US
  • The UK seems to be proudly unorganized and poorly documented. Finding things in the US is easy.
  • Jerky! I hike a lot and oh how I miss my jerky. Still haven't found a good source of traveling protein other than making my own.
  • VitD supplementation needed for much of the year (some areas of US have the same problem)
  • As CT stated, the supplement industry is behind. And extremely over priced. Cheaper to order supplements (VitD,Mag,K2,...) and some food products from sites like iherb.com with the shipping and customs costs.
  • For such densely populated areas (like London) there are surprisingly few groups/communities related to our lifestyles. This may be a London specific issue.
  • Many other areas are behind or non-existent. CT mentioned cholesterol testing. Same for VitD testing.
  • While food is generally less processed than the US, it is more processed than mainland Europe.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 25, 2010
at 01:04 PM

Very good points. Have you tried biltong? Very similar to jerky

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 25, 2010
at 03:13 PM

CT - Yeah. Many safa (South Africans) friends have mentioned and shared biltong and droewors. Most of what I've found isn't labeled or is sugar and nitrate packed. But now I'll start the search for good stuff. Thanks for the reminder.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 09, 2011
at 10:02 PM

good points, not europe in general I want to add on all the points

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 10, 2011
at 10:29 AM

I took some droewors hiking- not as dry as biltong but they lasted the 10 days easily and were much easier to eat.

51c2cdd55bf287026db68cf31a6d0a0b

on June 24, 2011
at 11:54 AM

I agree with many of these but would also add a negative that the Paleo lifestyle in the UK does not seem to be well organised at the moment across the UK not just London, however that is changing thanks to posts like this! You do comment on meat being more expensive here, but then that is down to the quality of UK meat being generally better - which is a positive too. :)

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on June 24, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Hutch - Agreed completely. The community isn't here yet.

5
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 24, 2010
at 06:53 PM

I'm a Brit. Major differences I've perceived are:

  1. I've never heard anyone outside the paleo circle talk about grass fed meats. I'm sure it's available, but doesn't seem as widely promoted. Same goes for raw dairy - available, but you have to dig quite hard.

  2. Cholesterol testing and knowledge is woeful here compared to the US.

  3. I think the supplement industry is a bit behind too. I find it hard to get many of the supplements discussed here frequently. Well - not hard to get them, but hard to get assurance of quality, which is vital when supplementing.

That's my tuppence for what it's worth

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:20 PM

How do. I'm UK based as well (London). I read in some comments at Mark's Daily Apple that most UK cattle are grass fed but can't find anything to confirm that. Waitrose's new organic brand (Duchy) states that their beef and lamb is grass fed. That currently makes up most of my meat purchases. Some supermarkets occasionally carry less conventional meats like venison, buffalo (burger) and rabbit.

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:28 PM

Don't think there is a market for it just yet. Hope the market grows though - It is getting tiring reading all the small print. Spent a good 5 minutes look for nitrate-free bacon (to no avail)!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Almost all UK cattle is kept on grass for most of the year, how much supplemental feed they get varies. It's hard to sell beef as "a bit more grass-fed than the rest".

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:57 PM

Almost all UK cattle is kept on grass for most of the year, how much supplemental feed they get varies. Its hard to sell beef as "slightly more grass-fed than the rest".

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:40 PM

How do you do bewilder. I love the Duchy range (Prince Charles sold out to Waitrose last year). Very glad to hear their meat is grass fed. But why don't they advertise it more?

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 24, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Have you tried Borough Market? Some very specialist meat retailers there.

05c56518902ce29c9037d4e3ac3484d5

(0)

on September 24, 2010
at 07:31 PM

Quick addition to the above: "Organic cattle have to be fed a minimum of 60 per cent forage" http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/7138035/The-Kitchen-Thinker-corn-fed-cows.html

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 27, 2010
at 07:59 PM

Happy to see this farmer mentioning Weston A. Price and the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation. Could be a marketing ploy, but unlikely. Quote from their site: "Healthy Soil = Healthy Grass = Healthy Animals = Healthy Meat & Milk = Healthy People!"

4
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on January 26, 2011
at 04:51 PM

I'm british, South East England and have found a farm that sells grass fed beef quite local, I'm thinking of starting a british Paleo Website actually, seems to be growing in awareness, been some good articles in the media lately. Also found a website that sells refined (not hydrogenated) coconut oil which is tasteless and SUPER cheap, usually used for soap but safe for consumption.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on January 26, 2011
at 04:52 PM

Not that I dislike the coconut taste, I love it! Sometimes it's not appropriate though :D

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 09, 2011
at 10:06 PM

keep us updated on a UK version of this, good idea!

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 10, 2011
at 09:06 AM

Will do :) Got a meeting with the website guy in a couple of weeks.

4
63ea4c19c40218a28cad7a7e5538bc62

on September 24, 2010
at 09:22 PM

Hi.

Just wanted to pass on my experiences of Paleo living in the UK. I currently live in London & at first struggled to 'hunt & gather my food', now that is sourced & I can't recommend finding your local farmers market enough. The food is of the highest quality, seasonal & mostly organic. I even get my raw organic milk from my market.

http://www.lfm.org.uk/

Another good information source is natural food finder. It covers a wide produce /geographical variety & is extremely useful.

http://www.naturalfoodfinder.co.uk/

Hope that helps.

Darren

Think like child, train like a beast.

D42a1f9a7a687e5354cc362d50bced56

(80)

on November 02, 2010
at 09:31 AM

I'd heartily recommend Notting Hill farmers market on Saturdays. As you said they've got organic pastured meat at reasonable prices and raw jersey (A2) milk and dairy if your into it. I've tried the Marylebone market before, they had a better selection of game and offal but the prices where much higher so I've not been back.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:25 PM

Hang on, I though raw milk is illegal in the EU? It is in Ireland.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 10, 2011
at 12:46 PM

I can buy raw milk in my local farmer's market (about 3 minute's walk away). It's in a peculiar sort of vending machine too, not hidden behind the counter, which you have to ask for in code.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 10, 2011
at 04:14 PM

There is no raw milk directive in the EU. Actually in the last year or two the vending machines with raw milk have become real popular in Slovenia and Italy.

3
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:09 PM

I'm from Canterbury. Not really knowing anything about how things are in the US, I don't have much to comment, but the main contrast I notice from the forums is how much easier everything is. As I've noted here and here, I can get everything I need from one shop (Sainsburys) pretty cheaply. Also, as far as I know, most British meat is fed mostly on grass/silage, so I've never worried about sourcing grassfed meat (though I'm pretty laissez faire about grassfed anyway).

One other thing I seem to have noticed is that far fewer people in the UK worry about or have their doctors test and worry about their cholesterol levels. Admittedly, this could just be the very biased nature of the two samples, but I know very few people who have had their cholesterol tested, let alone who know what it is and regularly check changes.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 16, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Is it because you don't have television advertisements for pharmaceuticals like statins?

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on September 16, 2011
at 05:54 PM

It's probably a factor. You can't imagine my shock/horror when I first saw adverts for medicines online. That said it's not as though we're a statin-free wonderland. My grandmother has innumerable health woes due to being a diabetic who only eats sugar and due to her statins, but still their only concern is making sure her cholesterol is low enough. As it happens her cholesterol was never high (by any standards anyway), but she still had a stroke, to her doctor's utter confusion.

3
Ddc6e183c60193575bbc43455bdbd113

on March 10, 2011
at 06:36 PM

Brits are ideally situated to follow a hunter-gatherer diet. According to genetic research, 80% of the genes in the UK are descended from 7 hunter-gatherer males who lived during the Ice Ages. Few UK genes descended from the first farmers of the Middle East. The UK made a late transition to agriculture and these New Stone Age foods are problematic in many ways. The diminish stature, steal minerals from bones, are lacking in essential vitamins, particularly the crucial vitamin D that easily becomes deficient in low sun light. The old Irish song with the line "the fairest of the fair" has a real point---a female with fair skin would synthesize vitamin D better when sun light is faint and heavy clothes must cover the skin; she would have the best formed skeleton and have better health as well.

The British Isles are blessed with access to sea food, something our Ice Age ancestors ate a lot of, and game, a complete source of vitamins, proteins, and healthy fats that was the primary food source for hunter-gatherers during early human evolution. Deer, antelope, wild boar, elk, aurochs and even rhinoceros and crocodiles were mainstays of the early human diet. Grass fed beef is an amazingly nutritious food and satisfying. And, the abundance of fresh vegetables and seasonal fruits is a close fit to the ideal diet.

If you eat a diet composed of these foods, you will eat fewer calories in total and expend energy more willingly. Modern grain-based foods, particularly the processed versions, require you to live in constant hunger in order to maintain body weight and composition. They overdrive the insulin pathway, which ages you prematurely and floods your body with damaging reactive oxygen products. A dose of sugar sends the sex hormone testosterone (in both females and males) crashing and makes you gain fat. Eventually, your liver becomes feminized and the body fat changes testosterone into estrogen. That is the beginning of the end of your sex life. It is not only sex drive that crashes, your passion for your loved ones and for life decline with because of many other biochemical changes that are produced by the appalling modern diet.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 10, 2011
at 07:23 PM

I think war time rationing had a big effect on British diet. Our parents lived 15 years of rationing (only Holland suffered more). I think this makes the British more adaptable than most, you don't have to go so far back.

3
B6729a6379ad1d5e0a682aa7b3365030

on March 09, 2011
at 08:45 PM

I just wanted to drop in to the conversation. I'm from Florida, but living in West London for my Master's in Evolutionary Psych. I'm really new to the Paleo lifestyle--8 days into the Whole30 after a week of Sisson-styled Primal.

Grateful for the tips and comments posted on this page. I'm looking forward to getting out of the Uxbridge supermarkets and to the weekend markets for some better food choices.

Thanks everyone!

B6729a6379ad1d5e0a682aa7b3365030

(35)

on March 09, 2011
at 08:47 PM

Oops, I forgot to mention this. I've found that the little independent cash-and-carries are great for low prices on coconut oil, almond flour, nuts, eggs, and ghee. Definitely helpful for my Uni budget!

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:11 PM

By the way, I live mostly off of supermarkets. Lamb from there is generally of very high quality and cheaper than what you find in the weekend markets.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:09 PM

I'm also in West London (Ealing) but work out in the Hayes and Uxbridge area.

B6729a6379ad1d5e0a682aa7b3365030

(35)

on March 18, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Hi Sean! I'm living in Uxbridge, and usually head to Ealing once a week. Any tips on local paleo-friendly establishments/activities in the area? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

3
154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on September 25, 2010
at 02:00 PM

I live in London. I'm still relatively new to the paleo / primal way of doing things so I'm not always sure what I should be looking out for.

At the moment I just try to stick to fresh food and hope that the meat industry isn't as bad as the US.

BTW, I've just created a Paleo / Primal in London FB group so we can share info and maybe organise a meet-up. I know there is is meetups.com group but I hate using that site.

Here's the link:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Paleo-Primal-London/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Paleo-Primal-London/#!/pages/Paleo-Primal-London/111658732228458

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on September 25, 2010
at 03:16 PM

You've got your first 'Likes' on the page.

2
Fbb216f7638604b77126d08f0234b01a

on November 06, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Another here in the midlands. I have no trouble getting great paleo foods, though it's only myself I'm feeding.

I do a run to Tesco on wednesday and saturday eve for my shopping, around 7.30-8.30 and can usually pick up as much veg as I want in the reduced section at insane prices. ie 10p for a cabbage. Plenty of meat gets reduced too at around this time. Picked up a 2lb lamb shoulder joint for ??3.60 this week.

Am I the only one who winces at every mention of paleo and low carb in the mainstream press? If the cat really gets out of the bag, god help us. There is simply not enough proper food to go round.

I don't think it's very paleo to be spreading the word - the less competition for food the better I survive, and the fatter the general population the more desirable I seem in the eyes of the fairer sex!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:20 PM

Good job finding a lamb shoulder a that price, they are very tasty.

2
0b90a7029cead87fbd5e900495c6bc62

on July 04, 2011
at 09:33 PM

Hi, I'm from sunny Newcastle. Home of binge drinking and doner kebabs

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:27 PM

That's the whole of England :P

2
Dc8ec73989c7b37c006f2031dd648a61

on July 04, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I'm from Stoke-on-Trent, been doing paleo for around 5months now... new here at paleo hacks though have found some answers here from googling in the past :)

Really hope this kind of nutritional/lifestyle movement becomes more popular in the UK. Some people point out that we have it better in some aspects than say the U.S but people are still oblivious to so much nutritional knowledge and just believe the conventional wisdoms (I was one of them of course).

2
51c2cdd55bf287026db68cf31a6d0a0b

on June 24, 2011
at 12:08 PM

I am British and from the Bedfordshire area, lots of countryside, farmland and farm shops selling quality products.

We have a few organisations here too that promote local produce and 'proper' food that help us source the products we prefer, plus the markets here are great for all sorts of foods as the population is diverse. Are any of you on Twitter? You can follow me @hutch_pr. I don't always talking about Paleo but it'd be great to have some Brits I can share ideas with and chat too about the hurdles Brits face.

I have liked NomadicNeil's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Paleo-Primal-London/111658732228458?sk=wall so maybe in time we could have a UK meet up! :)

For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/11041/how-many-people-on-here-are-from-the-united-kingdom#ixzz1QC7gMODF

2
7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on June 24, 2011
at 08:53 AM

I'm British and live in a village in the country. That makes it easier to get free range, grass fed eggs and meat. I can buy from the farm and look at the animals. Cholesterol testing is Britain is woeful! No separation of HDL and LDL, only total figures. Very little understanding of the paleo way of life that I've found, but it's easy to do.

2
186b8011a1572ec5b3ac68f5a7a72d2d

on March 10, 2011
at 08:41 PM

Another Brit here - Southerner decamped to Liverpool.

From my experiences abroad, and talking to non-British mates, I think the massive prevalence of sandwiches in our diet is one aspect of Paleo that's perhaps more difficult here than elsewhere. Especially at catered functions (conferences, meetings etc.) it's generally assumed that "everyone eats sandwiches"!

Dc8ec73989c7b37c006f2031dd648a61

on July 04, 2011
at 06:38 PM

haha, indeed... everytime I mention to someone about what I eat the first thing they say 90% of the time is "YOU DON'T EAT BREAD? WHAT THE HELL DO YOU EAT THEN" :)

2
840d227745d271a2d99d65fb5b0d13c1

(135)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:57 PM

I buy all my food from my local farmers market. All my meat grass fed and finished and I get organic seasonal veg there as well.

2
9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 09, 2011
at 09:52 PM

I'm english, but live in Spain.

Good question

Major differences are most of the points touched on in the film "Food INc". Our food industry is not mass produced at the same level here, fortunately. A lot of our cousins on the other side of the atlantic doing paleo, go for eating grass feed beef 7 days a week, because of it's omega 3 content. Here, I don't think we have to worry about the same issues, I prefer to vary meats too...

I think it'd be good to have a separate forum one day, I think our humor is different too :)

Edit: Sometimes I've done bootcamp training in Victoria park, London, it's a kind of paleo thing to do, really recommend it. It's free for the first few sessions: http://www.armybootcampfitness.co.uk/parks/victoria-park

2
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on September 24, 2010
at 10:57 PM

Also from UK. Lots of grass fed / organic here in Sussex - and where my parents live in Northumberland. So - I assume there's loads of good food inbetween the two!

1
421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

on November 06, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Not British - But Irish living in London.

Find it generally easy to get good quality meats and produce - Waitrose have a good selection of grass-fed meats and Paleo-friendly stocks etc for stews and soups.

Recently bought and have fallen in love with my slow cooker/crockpot!!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:21 PM

Hello from Scotland :)

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:25 PM

Are Waitrose's aberdeen angus beef grass finished? I can't find any evidence of that. For their "essential Waitrose" product they state that it is grass fed and grain finished.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:48 PM

I love Edinburgh, lived there for the last 4 years. I'm now living in Aberdeen which is a long way from anywhere.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:12 PM

Hi Sean - I'm not actually sure to be honest. I will check the next time I'm in the supermarket. That's frustrating if it's grain finished, and if it is, I obviously need to read food labels more thoroughly.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 09:51 PM

I'd bet Waitrose beef gets fed some grain unless stated otherwise, they'd still be mostly grass-fed though. I seen M&S aberdeen angus beef with "grain-fed" as a selling point on the label.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 07:58 PM

Hello Matthew :) How's all in Scotland? I have a friend who lives in Edinburgh and adores it - What part do you live in?

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:37 PM

Great, now I need to find another source of grass fed meat (sigh)! Do any other British supermarkets sell completely grass fed meat? I've never shopped at Whole Foods, do they sell meat?

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:06 AM

I know Waitrose "Essential" beef is grain finished. The site says it: http://www.waitrose.com/home/inspiration/About_our_product_ranges/food/meat/beef.html

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:07 AM

Quote: "Our essential Waitrose British beef comes from prime cattle, from both native and continental breeds, that are fed a healthy grass and cereal-based diet."

1
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on November 06, 2011
at 03:27 PM

London, Docklands.

I am currently sitting in a "Pret A Manager" writing this and pondering the "pain aux raisin" which used to be a staple of my previous slow-carb Saturdays. I have recently switched to Paleo after realising not even Tim Ferris could survive a lifetime of off-day carb binging without hurting himself. I have two chicken breasts and a punnet of blueberries in my bag for my mid-afternoon snack, those spiral pastries are not so appealing anymore.

As a previous poster mentioned England truly is a sandwich country, millions are sold every lunchtime her and toast is breakfast liturgy. What I am also noticing is the increasing amount of vegatarianism, which I think is being partly fueled by climate-change discussions and the exposure of factory farming in the media. It seems from conversations with people (especially girls) going veggie and reaching for the fruit smoothies are the first step to health. There is also perhaps still fear of eggs here possibly related to cholesterol or salmonella.

I am actually beginning to look into produce sourcing and stumbled across http://www.primalstore.co.uk last night. Anyone ever purchased from them?

Farmers are having a hard time here, so like others I am inclined to support local farmers but it will take some homework to work out from whom. It would be interesting to hear from others where they buy their produce, and I would be keen to meet up with people to hear their stories.

Since going Paleo I am actually beginning to be really concerned by the breakfast heritage we have here. Watching a TV advert explaining how the best thing to give your kids in the morning is a big bowl of suger-coated breakfast cereal is starting to make me wince.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:26 PM

How can you get through the day without a bowl of sugar coated cereal?!

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Ah Pret.... Sandwich lovers heaven! The sandwiches all look so good, but the thoughts of actually physically eating one never crosses my mind. With regards to buying produce, I think that someone may have already posted about Notting Hill farmers markets. I've never investigated purchasing produce from there but will certainly look into it. British breakfast heritage generally consists of coffee and pastries (but I guess that's the norm everywhere these days), or MacDonalds breakfast - Vile! Even watching my colleagues eating bowls of Special K every morning makes me feel unwell.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:03 PM

Ah I remember fondly the last time I ate cereal... I had been Paleo for about 3 months and had some non-Paleo guests to stay. They had Cheerios for breakfast so I thought 'Why not' and had a bowl with coconut milk. I think to say that I thought I was going to die afterwards is an understatement. I thought I was going to vomit and got really bad shakes, my arms and legs went totally weak and I had a horrible pressure feeling in my head. Never, ever, ever again!

F42e0775218d2c88fcb1869f3b7ea58e

(130)

on November 10, 2011
at 09:36 AM

I know what you mean about the sandwich culture. Also, the thing I found so weird when I first moved here: beans on toast! I honestly cannot tell you how much I rate Abel and Cole. I get a veg box from them every week and lots of meat from them, and their stuff is always awesome and their service is so great. Also, I blame Paul McCartney for the whole vegetarian thing.

421492f8989c426af583520a3d5fd136

(522)

on November 11, 2011
at 09:09 PM

Ah, beans on toast... That was one thing that I really enjoyed pre-Paleo, very much comfort food! Where are you from, jessyannb? Wow thank you so much for mentioning Abel and Cole, I had never heard of them before, have just Googled their site - I will see if they deliver in my area, would be fantastic! All I pretty much eat is meat and veg anyway so it would be ideal. I wish I could 'upvote' you a million times for giving me this tip! :) Thank you!!

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 05, 2011
at 12:00 PM

Hang on, breakfast heritage? The Full English is the epitome paleo - if you skip the fried bread of course. Breakfast cereals are very much a US invention and it is just as bad over here, except now it's all about fibre (and occasionally protein) to keep kids full so they don't get distracted by their ravenous hunger. Cereal with as much protein as an egg? Why not just eat an egg?!

1
F42e0775218d2c88fcb1869f3b7ea58e

on November 06, 2011
at 02:34 PM

I live in London, but am originally from America.
I have been living in the UK for 14 years, and the difference in the food culture since I moved here is incredible. There is so much awesome food now, and such an emphasis on local and traditionally produced things. Really good meat, excellent fish, lots of farmers markets, etc. My dad lives in NC and getting raw milk is like doing a drug deal, but I can just go to the market and buy it (Raw Milk is not legal in Scotland though, you have to pretend you are buying it for your cat). The thing that sucks over here is that there is really not a strong paleo 'movement' or community. I would love to chat to/meet up with people who are into the same stuff, instead of feeling like I am doing it on my own and nobody knows what I am talking about! Also, supplements in the US are miles ahead.

1
C534cb215f9d03b75e8961ff88ea9837

on September 21, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Hi, asked similar question earlier today, didn't realise this had been asked previously. Will keep in touch.

1
47988c83c354dff62a93b5d13f5d1c3d

on September 16, 2011
at 05:14 PM

Here's another one from Birmingham.

1
F7ce5884eec1e13cc199f68b7c315483

on June 24, 2011
at 07:47 AM

another brit here whoop whoop - watford hertforshire :)!!!!

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