0

votes

When I don't eat as much, I'm not as hungry? o_O

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2013 at 3:07 AM

I'm a fifteen year old paleo girl who's looking to lose a little more fat. I've been mostly paleo since June, with occasional cheats here and there, mainly on holidays. I ate less than I normally do at my meals yesterday and today, and I noticed that today at 5:30, which is when I'm usually rather hungry and start eating/making dinner, I did have some soup cooking, but I was kind of like 'meh', even though the last time that I ate was a small-ish lunch like 5 hours ago. I'm usually quite hungry for dinner. I'm not really complaining; calorie restriction will help me lose a little fat, within reason of course, I'd never go anorexic or anything >< But I'm wondering about the science behind this, and whether it actually slows down my metabolism or anything. I haven't really noticed any difference in energy levels, though I've been stuck at my house all day today so I haven't really expended much energy anyway. So, what do you guys think?

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (310)
  • Views
    1.1K
  • Last Activity
    1461D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

3
Dbb6872f139877fe1a94aeb471baa7d1

on January 07, 2013
at 03:50 AM

I don't know the science behind it, but I get the same way. If I wind up inadvertently IFing (not in the mood for breakfast, too busy for lunch), then I really couldn't care less about food, even if it's cooking. Until I sit down to eat, at least, at which point I eat everything but the tablecloth!

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on January 07, 2013
at 04:33 PM

This is consistent with what Seth Roberts hypothesizes. Less of a signal (flavor) means less hunger. The flip side of this is processed food- a very loud and dependable signal, which increases our appetites and encourages us to gain weight.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 07, 2013
at 02:49 PM

Seems to make sense, from a evolutionary standpoint. The body can down regulate hunger in times of reduced caloric opportunity. But when there is plenty of options, it up regulates. Think spring in the valley. Lots of fruits and vegetables for man to consume. So get as many calories as possible, store excess as fat, and use that as energy when the dry season comes in and wipes out all the crops..

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!