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What's bad about a McDonalds cheeseburger, if weight gain and food reactions are not issues?

Answered on September 26, 2014
Created May 16, 2013 at 2:40 PM

I???m healthy, don???t have any weight problems and have never experienced any adverse reaction to everyday foods. I did a 30-day strict paleo diet and it didn???t make any difference to me. Given this, I follow a basically paleo template diet (on the assumption that this will extend my healthspan) but frequently supplement it with unambiguously non-paleo foods. One such non-paleo item that has recently been tempting me is the McDonalds cheeseburger, mainly on account of how cheap and convenient it is. I know McBurgers bad because of the excess carbs, sugar and calories but, beyond that, what???s wrong with it?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on May 17, 2013
at 07:09 AM

If you think about a cheeseburger it should be some bread, some cheese, and beef patty / spices. This isn't so bad. If you look at the ingredients for a mcDonalds burger, you're looking at extracts and chemicals. Just the '100% angus beef' patty has 4 kinds of artificial coloring before you even get started on the ingredients.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 16, 2013
at 10:16 PM

My understanding is that a 100% natural hamburger will do the same thing. Bread that's not stored in plastic naturally goes stale instead of growing mold, and once it's stale it basically lasts forever. Cooked meat is low-moisture, low-carb, and high-fat enough that it basically mummifies too.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 16, 2013
at 10:14 PM

By your calculation, making your own burgers saves £2.80 per pound of meat and takes 30 minutes, if we ignore the time it takes to shop and the inconvenience of carrying food with you. So by the purely economic argument, making your own burgers is a good deal if your time is worth less than £5.60/hour (adjusted for the number of burgers you make at once and the factor by which the time investment scales per burger).

E05b8d2c9ae8a9a92341785f342f131d

(346)

on May 16, 2013
at 07:00 PM

Thanks for the interesting articles. According to McDonalds, they're not quite as bad as "today's burger" described by Eric Schlosser, at least not here in the UK: http://www.mcdonalds.co.uk/ukhome/whatmakesmcdonalds/questions/food/burgers/where-do-you-source-ingredients-from-in-particular-beef.html

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 16, 2013
at 04:53 PM

http://www.christianpost.com/news/14-year-old-burger-doesnt-rot-food-is-fairly-dry-when-made-says-mcdonalds-video-94594/

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 16, 2013
at 04:04 PM

Well, first of all, a McDonald's cheeseburger is not food.

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8 Answers

2
C16e2e3642960bfaabee1c1c7fbf9df1

(384)

on May 16, 2013
at 06:04 PM

You mentioned about cheapness and convenience, it'd probably be cheaper (and really not that difficult) to make your own.

McDonalds cheeseburger - ??1 or something ($1.50 in the US? I'm not sure)

750g of beef mince from shop - ??4 ($6 or something, not good with currency rates, probably cheaper and better quality from a farmers market)

That's enough mince for 7 burgers, throw in an egg or two to bind (plus onion, garlic etc) and it works about 60p per burger. Takes the best part of 30 minutes and you know (mostly) where it's been and what's in it. I've never been convinced that mcdonalds use 100% beef for their burgers, and if so it's far from a high quality standard.

But do whatever you want. If you're fit and healthy and it's an occasional treat or you're out with friends socializing, then enjoy.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 16, 2013
at 10:14 PM

By your calculation, making your own burgers saves £2.80 per pound of meat and takes 30 minutes, if we ignore the time it takes to shop and the inconvenience of carrying food with you. So by the purely economic argument, making your own burgers is a good deal if your time is worth less than £5.60/hour (adjusted for the number of burgers you make at once and the factor by which the time investment scales per burger).

2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 16, 2013
at 04:35 PM

Of everything on McD's menu, the hamburger is probably the least offensive.

Ingredients: 100% Beef Patty, Regular Bun, Ketchup, Mustard, Pickle Slices, Onions

http://nutrition.mcdonalds.com/getnutrition/ingredientslist.pdf

Of course that comes from nasty leftover beef, soaked in ammonia, etc.

Personally, I only go to McDs for coffee, and even that is rare

1
F69da86ad5ad986a09c73abd757863a1

(127)

on May 16, 2013
at 04:45 PM

As stated above, I would be most concerned about the oil the beef is cooked in. I prefer real butter or coconut oil. They use seed oil and other garbage.

Also, the meat you are getting will have very low omega 3 content and little to no CLA content - both are major reasons I personally prefer grass-fed beef. CLA is being studied to fight cancer!

1
Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on May 16, 2013
at 04:35 PM

PUFA will probably be the worst thing.

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 16, 2013
at 03:53 PM

The best argument I've seen, beyond the usual objections, is "which cow". Eric Schlosser's argument, spelled out here http://www.depauw.edu/news-media/latest-news/details/13057 There is no specific animal associated with the meat. The following article shows an attempt to describe the cattle from the meat composition: http://www.forbes.com/2008/11/10/burgers-health-food-forbeslife-cs_rr_1110health.html

E05b8d2c9ae8a9a92341785f342f131d

(346)

on May 16, 2013
at 07:00 PM

Thanks for the interesting articles. According to McDonalds, they're not quite as bad as "today's burger" described by Eric Schlosser, at least not here in the UK: http://www.mcdonalds.co.uk/ukhome/whatmakesmcdonalds/questions/food/burgers/where-do-you-source-ingredients-from-in-particular-beef.html

0
Medium avatar

on September 26, 2014
at 04:11 AM

You know they just say that junk food is not healthy. I read that they piu sugar even in bread to make people addicted. But it has never stopped me to eat there as I LOVE IT! 

0
De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

on May 16, 2013
at 04:38 PM

I heard once 'ifit goes bad, its good for you, if it doesn't go bad, its bad for you'

ie foods that spoil are 'live' and therfore good to consume when fresh, if food doesn't spoil, it isn't food

Test it yourself, buy your cheesburger, put it away in a drawer, come back to it 15 years later & it will still be in the same state, yummy!

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 16, 2013
at 04:53 PM

http://www.christianpost.com/news/14-year-old-burger-doesnt-rot-food-is-fairly-dry-when-made-says-mcdonalds-video-94594/

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 16, 2013
at 10:16 PM

My understanding is that a 100% natural hamburger will do the same thing. Bread that's not stored in plastic naturally goes stale instead of growing mold, and once it's stale it basically lasts forever. Cooked meat is low-moisture, low-carb, and high-fat enough that it basically mummifies too.

0
86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25

(2312)

on May 16, 2013
at 03:11 PM

Funny that I just saw this article titled "WHAT'S REALLY INSIDE THOSE MCDONALD'S FRENCH FRIES?" I know it's not the cheeseburger but still...

http://www.livestrong.com/article/1002598-whats-really-inside-those-mcdonalds-french-fries/

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