2

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What KIND of magnesium is in our foods that contain magnesium?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 20, 2012 at 11:11 AM

I have heard that there are several kinds of magnesium. I don't want to have to take more supplements than a multi-vitamin. I want to know, is it possible to find out what kind of magnesium is in the healthy foods that contain magnesium??

Link to "What dietary foods contain magnesium:" http://paleohacks.com/questions/1028/how-can-we-get-enough-magnesium#axzz219XAeAlT

How do I know I'm getting the right one?

Thanks!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on July 28, 2012
at 11:28 PM

^ interesting. Sounds like it might be worth a try. I wonder where you can get pure magnesium chloride for soaking though...

285b5c951f83ac056568ac302399cb60

(70)

on July 28, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Magnesium Chloride is a better choice for soaking. Epsom Salt is rapidly excreted through the kidneys which makes it difficult to assimilate,Since Magnesium chloride is easier assimilated and metabolized by the body-you need much more Epsom Salt in a bath than magnesium chloride to get similar results.

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 24, 2012
at 11:49 PM

Well, I tried it. It may have helped, but not as much as I thought. I bought kefir for the same situation, and it has seemed to help! At least I feel better all over, and I attribute that to the kefir.

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 21, 2012
at 12:01 AM

I'm def going to try the epsom salts. They sound way more easy and safe than other avenues I haven't tried yet.

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 21, 2012
at 12:00 AM

This makes sense. At least it sounds like it's worth trying. The dietary supplements I am using don't seem to be as good either. Thanks!

  • C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

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5 Answers

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3
3956e5b5f5b91e15727aacbd14e508a3

on July 20, 2012
at 12:13 PM

Hi,

I've been doing a bit of research on magnesium lately, and from what I can tell there is only one kind of naturally occuring magnesium in food products - and that is the kind of magnesium that our bodies need. If you go to any search engine and type in 'top 10 foods containing magnesium' it will give you a variety of websites. Black beans, wholewheat, blackstrap molasses, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds are high on the list.

You might have thought that there were different types of magnesium because the supplements for sale in our shops have different names - magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, glycine etc. But the manufacturers of supplements add magnesium to these other compounds to help our bodies absorb the magnesium better. When magnesium is ingested in isolation from other vitamins and minerals, it is difficult to absorb and tends to give us diarrhoea, hence the manufacturers add it to glycine or gluconate or oxide for better bioavailability.

However, the plot thickens because these different substances are also absorbed by our bodies in different ways. Some of them will give us loose stools while others are highly absorbable. From what I've read so far the most absorbable types of magnesium supplements to take are magnesium citrate or magnesium glycinate. Glycinate is apparently much gentler on the bowels and shouldn't cause a loose stool problem (One chap I came across called Dr George Eby cured his manic depression after taking magnesium glycinate capsules, thus showing that magnesium deficiency is one possible cause of some types of depression). Two types to avoid are magnesium oxide because the oxide goes straight through our systems with very little of the magnesium being absorbed. And avoid magnesium gluconate (not glycinate which is good, but gluconate) because it is utilised by our bodies in a similar way that monosodium glutomate is utilised, and as we know there is lots of controversy and health issues surrounding that compound. I wish I had the links on hand to give the source of my information, but I'm not that organised. I must start doing that! I think it might have been Dr Eby's website where I read that information.

Alternatively, it's also possible to buy magnesium oil which you apply to the skin which is absorbed through the skin and utilised by our body while by-passing the bowels completely and avoiding the loose stool problem. Oh yes, bathing in Epsom Salts is another excellent way to improve your magnesium intake.

I'm not sure if I'm allowed to name a book? But if it's OK to mention a book called The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, you'll find that magnesium is crucial for our health and it's important to make sure our diets contain sufficient amounts of this mineral to maintain our health. Basically, if you don't want to take supplements, just make sure your diet contains lots and lots of magnesium rich foods. The USDA states on their website that it's impossible to overdose on magnesium if we get all our intake from food ... however, if anyone has kidney issues they need to consult their health care provider before increasing their levels of magnesium just in case their kidneys are unable to excrete excess amounts.

Good health to you. :-) Meadowsweet

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 21, 2012
at 12:01 AM

I'm def going to try the epsom salts. They sound way more easy and safe than other avenues I haven't tried yet.

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 24, 2012
at 11:49 PM

Well, I tried it. It may have helped, but not as much as I thought. I bought kefir for the same situation, and it has seemed to help! At least I feel better all over, and I attribute that to the kefir.

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on July 20, 2012
at 11:52 AM

IDK. Magnesium sulphate is the one thats in the ocean, if that helps at all! It seems river water has a variety of types: sulphates and carbonates, chlorides?

It seems magnesium is highly water soluble, and an ideal way to take it would be in water. Alot of the european mineral waters have a decent amount. Evian has something like 24mg/L of magnesium. S.pelligrino has 52.5 mg /l!

If I was rich, id just drink some select european mineral waters and that would be the end of the story :P

If you do happen to be rich, heres a magnesium versus water brand list:

http://www.mgwater.com/waters.shtml

And trust me if its in water, or pure supplement, it will absorb alot moreso than in foods (especially if you eat high fat with them). I was eating load and loads of spinach, nuts, berries etc....to no avail in my case, with my high fat diet, and screwed digestion. Maybe in normal healthy folks this is a non issue with high fat diets, IDK.

(I had low magnesium recently. Tried the supplements, which worked great, immediate relaxation, but they made me have "stomach issues", if u catch the drift. Not fun side effect )

But if your not rich, and you want something more natural, or at least less pills, you either eat, like a serious bucketload of magnesium foods each day, or take the odd epsom salts bath/footbath (or spend lots of time in the ocean, if your coastal and its sunny).

Ive been doing the epsom salt baths now. So long as you dont overdo it, theres definately less stomach issues than supplements. It still seems pretty well absorbed, like quite strong versus food. I think you need to make sure u dont use too much too often, bathwise, and dont soak for longer than say 20 mins. I am still new to this epsom salts bath thing. Relaxing!

After being wound up and anxious from high fat, low carb, magnesium was a godsend. So glad I found it!

I suspect that this and perhaps other electrolyte minerals like potassium and sodium is where a lot of low carbers go wrong. Magnesium is only really partially absorbed from food in the small intestine (less with fat in foods IMO, more with water).

Its very very hard to get your minimum intake from foods regardless of dietary preferances/lifestyle (420mgs for men my age! Id have to be siphoning blended spinach into my mouth all day long!).

And doesnt even seem to be the ideal form to get it in (It seems to work much better in drinking water, or in water to absorb through ur skin, at least for me, but then I have somewhat compromised digestion)

Its just crappy they take it out of tap water :/ Water would normally be plenty of mg in nature...When I find a cheap water with decent magnesium in it, I am on it. In the mean time, the baths are awesome, so no worries i suppose!

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on July 21, 2012
at 12:00 AM

This makes sense. At least it sounds like it's worth trying. The dietary supplements I am using don't seem to be as good either. Thanks!

285b5c951f83ac056568ac302399cb60

(70)

on July 28, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Magnesium Chloride is a better choice for soaking. Epsom Salt is rapidly excreted through the kidneys which makes it difficult to assimilate,Since Magnesium chloride is easier assimilated and metabolized by the body-you need much more Epsom Salt in a bath than magnesium chloride to get similar results.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on July 28, 2012
at 11:28 PM

^ interesting. Sounds like it might be worth a try. I wonder where you can get pure magnesium chloride for soaking though...

0
82bb8cc50f861ee65dde332fe72fc337

on January 08, 2013
at 05:08 PM

just bought Twin Lab Magnesium caps (magnesium oxide), 400 mg. Btl states it has no tablet binders, coatings or colorings. No added flavorings, sugars, salt, artifical sweeteners, colorings preservatives or salicylates.

Other ingredients: gelatin, potato starch, magbesium silicate (what?),porified water, medium chain triglycerides(fat??), croscarmellose sodium (what salt??), magnesium aspartate (isn't this a sweetner) and finally silica (isn't this a synthetic drying agent).

OMG..what have I bought. I'm a 74 yr old young female who still rides my horse and is active, eat whole foods, exercise every day that includes by Total Gym and Nordic Trac Skier. Have borderline HBP (but doctor put me on meds) and I'm 5-9 and weigh 215 (very muscular and heavy thick bones - thanks Mom) but have nothing but heart disease in family (father died at 43 of an MI as well as only sibling who had his MI at 61; mother died after 2 sequential strokes at age 74). WHAT'S A PERSON TO DO ABOUT LACK OF KNOWLEDGE WHEN IT COMES TO SUPPLEMENTS???? I take multi vits (Natures Code)that include 2 multi tabs that incl Vit D, 1 tab green tea complex,l calc-mag-zinc and 1 gel tab Coenzyme Q10- vit E 200 IU and 9 mg of Lutein-Zeaxanthin..equivalent to amt contained in 2 cups each of broccoli, romaine lettuce and 1 cup each raw green beans and green peas.

0
Dabe1ce273fa98cde26939438d1d3580

on July 24, 2012
at 11:05 AM

Hi, it's Meadowsweet here. I just needed to make a correction to the post I made above. I said that it was best to avoid Magnesium Oxide and Gluconate ... I got the gluconate one wrong. I've found the source of my information and the product to avoid was magnesium glutamate not gluconate. Sorry about that. Here's the full quote:

“Never take magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium glutamate or magnesium aspartate, because they are either ineffective or neurotoxic. Magnesium glutamate and magnesium aspartate (which converts to glutamate in the liver) are commonly available magnesium compounds sold as dietary supplements. They should be considered as neurotoxic to depressives, and perhaps all people, and should not be used during treatment of depression, anxiety or similar hyperemotional disorders. Food and drink products containing monosodium glutamate and aspartame (aspartate) should never be used by depressives.” By Dr George Eby from an article entitled: "Treatment of Depression with magnesium and other natural agents - 222 references)".

Regarding the phytate content of grains, beans and seeds etc. I understand that if these products are left to soak in water with a squeeze of lemon juice or teaspoon of salt for 12 to 24 hours, much of the phytate content is reduced. Similarly, if bread is made from wheat grains which are ground into flour immediately prior to making bread, then there is sufficient phytase in the flour - which is a substance which breaks down phytates - enabling us to digest the nutrients sufficiently. Phytase counteracts phytates. Also, I've read that phytates in some instances are valuable as an anti-cancer agent, thus if we get sufficient minerals in our diet from other food sources, then a small amount of phytates in the grains and beans and so forth shouldn't result in mineral deficiency.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 20, 2012
at 12:37 PM

Often times, magnesium is tied up in phytates. So despite seeds, grains, and beans having high amounts by chemical assay, it's going to be less bioavailable than other sources. Whole foods, as a whole, have much much more bioavailable nutrients than do supplements, so I wouldn't sweat it too much.

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