2

votes

What else should we be eating?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 03, 2010 at 7:16 AM

I saw a great documentary last week on mountain gorillas. One thing that stood out to me was a section where the troop found a chunk of deadwood - which the presenter described as a "gorilla delicacy". I've also read (and Mark Sisson mentioned on a prebiotics post he did a few months back) that many primates consume soil from time to time.

We spend a lot of time analysing our current food universe and separating them into paleo and non-paleo foods, but my question is - what else could or should we be eating that nobody consumes at this point in time? I'm not advocating eating soil or deadwood, but am curious as to what our ancestors may have eaten that doesn't even seem to be an option in today's world.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 13, 2010
at 08:57 AM

Nice - my kids try and do this already!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 11, 2010
at 12:48 AM

There are good reasons for washing your hands with soap http://globalhandwashing.org/learn/health-impact.php

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on September 06, 2010
at 07:53 AM

I had Pinworms (Enterobiasis) from time to time - but that was no big problem... They were quite common then, especially in children. My grandmother gave me grated carotts with garlic to get rid of the worms.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:58 PM

Thanks for all the answers. I've decided to fashion a burger bun from clay, make the burger with minced insects, and a side of deadwood fries sprinkled with soil seasoning. I'll eat this whilst riding my horse. Bon appetit.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 05, 2010
at 07:19 AM

We tried a fried bug at a market in Mexico just to say we had- wouldn't want to use them as a regular food source, although certain areas there do. I saw one recipe on TV in which a wasp nest full of bugs was turned into a sauce.

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:14 AM

I hear cicadas are particularly good - I seem to remember Andrew Zimmern (Bizzare Foods) doing a whole episode on insects, and he covered lots of ground on them - I think he mentioned many are gram for gram a higher quality source of protein than red meat - who knew?!

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:11 AM

You know - I don't think people washed their hands even as recently as 200 years ago - handling meat, cutting poultry, all that jazz - and not a bar of soap around! Shoot - bathing is a recent thing for most civilized countries since around 1900 or so.

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:08 AM

I agree - as a kid who grew up roaming the woods behind our house in Connecticut, I would pick berries and eat lichens all the time. I would even make mud and leaf polstices to put on cuts and stuff (yeah, I was something of a hard-core boy scout). Though I do remember getting a tapeworm one time - so there is that to watch out for I guess...

7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on September 04, 2010
at 03:47 AM

Bugs are a relatively untapped food source. If I knew more about the nutrient profiles and safety (are any to be avoided?) and could get over my squeamishness, I would be out "hunting" for critters a couple of times per week.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 03, 2010
at 02:51 PM

Clay is another substance consumed by many trad cultures.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on September 03, 2010
at 07:38 AM

I know Dr. Art Ayers of Cooling Inflammation advocated eating unwashed garden vegetables for the beneficial bacteria in the soil. But how do we do this without our own gardens? And how do we know the health of the soil anyway?

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6 Answers

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4
0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on September 04, 2010
at 11:31 AM

As a kid I didn't bother about washing the fruits, berries, herbs, buds, nuts, mushrooms and other plants that I found while playing in the garden or in the wild... just rubbed off the soil so it wasn't too crunchy to eat.

My daddy told me which plants are edible or delicious - he learned it from his greatgrandmother during worldwar 2.

Today my daughter enjoys strolling around with me and picking here and there any edible plant-thing we can find.

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:08 AM

I agree - as a kid who grew up roaming the woods behind our house in Connecticut, I would pick berries and eat lichens all the time. I would even make mud and leaf polstices to put on cuts and stuff (yeah, I was something of a hard-core boy scout). Though I do remember getting a tapeworm one time - so there is that to watch out for I guess...

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on September 06, 2010
at 07:53 AM

I had Pinworms (Enterobiasis) from time to time - but that was no big problem... They were quite common then, especially in children. My grandmother gave me grated carotts with garlic to get rid of the worms.

3
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on September 03, 2010
at 02:05 PM

I work around horses, don't wash my hands before I eat lunch- mostly works for me. Some would call that dirty or "gross", but I can't see that Grok would have run to the nearest stream after killing and eating his dinner just to wash his hands. Maybe, but we've no proof.

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:11 AM

You know - I don't think people washed their hands even as recently as 200 years ago - handling meat, cutting poultry, all that jazz - and not a bar of soap around! Shoot - bathing is a recent thing for most civilized countries since around 1900 or so.

7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on September 04, 2010
at 03:47 AM

Bugs are a relatively untapped food source. If I knew more about the nutrient profiles and safety (are any to be avoided?) and could get over my squeamishness, I would be out "hunting" for critters a couple of times per week.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 11, 2010
at 12:48 AM

There are good reasons for washing your hands with soap http://globalhandwashing.org/learn/health-impact.php

2
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 11, 2010
at 12:04 AM

One word: worms

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/27/health/27brod.html?_r=1&em

Tempers the effects of multiple sclerosis, improves immunity, makes for cool party conversation.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 13, 2010
at 08:57 AM

Nice - my kids try and do this already!

2
7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on September 04, 2010
at 03:49 AM

Bugs are a relatively untapped food source. If I knew more about the nutrient profiles and safety (are any to be avoided?) and could get over my squeamishness, I would be out "hunting" for critters a couple of times each week.

48f9bb680fbc1bc1bd0d9cb09ee10273

(230)

on September 05, 2010
at 04:14 AM

I hear cicadas are particularly good - I seem to remember Andrew Zimmern (Bizzare Foods) doing a whole episode on insects, and he covered lots of ground on them - I think he mentioned many are gram for gram a higher quality source of protein than red meat - who knew?!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 05, 2010
at 07:19 AM

We tried a fried bug at a market in Mexico just to say we had- wouldn't want to use them as a regular food source, although certain areas there do. I saw one recipe on TV in which a wasp nest full of bugs was turned into a sauce.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on September 10, 2010
at 10:36 PM

snails (with bacon). A bit on the wild side, but wasily available

0
8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on September 04, 2010
at 04:39 AM

There are many kinds of wild edible plants...but of course it requires a lot of knowledge and discretion. You may not know that the kudzu plant is edible, its leaves, its stems, its root. The root (which is pure starch) however isn't to my knowledge nearly as nutritious as commonly eaten root vegetables (like potatoes), but there are medicinal benefits.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090826110122.htm

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