1

votes

Too much vegetables?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 26, 2011 at 2:38 AM

Is there any limit on how many vegetables you can eat? I have a pile of steamed broccoli every night love it! But do these calories matter?

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on July 27, 2011
at 10:07 PM

There was no purely vegetarian tribes. All humans ate some meat. But the proportion of vegetables to meat was lopsided in favor of starch. This is pretty much indisputable and I don't see how Nora gets away with her puerile argument.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on July 27, 2011
at 10:06 PM

Actually you can do a thought experiment and reach a diametrically opposite conclusion. Nora is really talking about the Ice Age survivors of human evolution. She's not talking about the vast majority of humans that subsited primarily on starchy vegetables for many many years prior to agriculture. These starchy veggies were: potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, yuca, winter squash, taro, batava, etc. You can include legumes here also. I used to believe the nonsense spewed by Nora until it became clear to me that human evolved eating primarily starch before agriculture.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 26, 2011
at 01:53 PM

I meant red peppers, but it's true, green do.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on July 26, 2011
at 01:36 PM

My body wants cookies!

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on July 26, 2011
at 11:43 AM

Actually, broccoli has little to no oxalates. Peppers on the other hand, are very high in oxalates. http://www.ohf.org/docs/OxalateContent092003.pdf Despite having a tendency to form kidney stones, I still eat foods that range from high to low oxalate content. Since I don't have any of those calcium-binding phytates in grains and beans, and make sure I get the right balance of minerals, I haven't had an issue with stones in almost 2 years.

B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

(783)

on July 26, 2011
at 04:30 AM

I usually do a quick sauté; not so long that that my veggies turn into nursing-home-style mush, but just enough for a good color change. Lots of butter/coconut oil and onions and garlic with it. That's my go-to for broccoli, cauliflower, and the like. Most other things I eat raw unless I'm making an Italian or Indian dish.

B2410a8542f3501755a715098a6011f7

on July 26, 2011
at 04:02 AM

Thanks for the response! I definitely see you point and I do vary the vegetables occasionally, but the meal itself is always different. Any favorite ways of doing vegetables yourself?

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11 Answers

10
B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

on July 26, 2011
at 03:40 AM

The answer is emphatically no, in my opinion. Above all else, listen to your gut. Some people do not tolerate large quantities of the same vegetable. If you can handle it, more power to you. The only caveat that I can think of is that having a fairly homogenous diet???that is, consuming a lot of the same thing regularly; having a very static diet???does have a potential for creating new allergies to those items. Mixing up what we eat is a good idea, especially to make sure that we are getting the benefits and nutrients from a variety of different foods. Cover all of your nutritional bases!

B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

(783)

on July 26, 2011
at 04:30 AM

I usually do a quick sauté; not so long that that my veggies turn into nursing-home-style mush, but just enough for a good color change. Lots of butter/coconut oil and onions and garlic with it. That's my go-to for broccoli, cauliflower, and the like. Most other things I eat raw unless I'm making an Italian or Indian dish.

B2410a8542f3501755a715098a6011f7

on July 26, 2011
at 04:02 AM

Thanks for the response! I definitely see you point and I do vary the vegetables occasionally, but the meal itself is always different. Any favorite ways of doing vegetables yourself?

4
Medium avatar

(19469)

on July 26, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Outside of the fact that non-starchy vegetables are almost universally "low-calorie" foods, I'm currently questioning whether or not veggies should be consumed without limit.

To quote a passage from Primal Body Primal Mind by Nora Gedgaudas...

"Studies of ancient human coprolites, or fossilized human feces, dating anywhere from three hundred thousand to as recent as fifty thousand years ago, have revealed essentially a complete lack of any plant material in the diets of the subjects studied (Bryant and Williams-Dean 1975). In other words, it is likely we subsisted for a very significant portion of our evolution largely on the meat and fat of animals we hunted...As omnivores and opportunists, we would always have certainly procured whatever might have been available to us for food. Permafrosts and droughts, however, left many of us limited options for stretches of time."

Perhaps more enlightening is this excerpt from the foreword of BPPM by Brent Pottinger...

"(Speaking about Nora Gedgaudas) She understands things like the thought-experiment that it's naive to think most plants are our safe, edible friends. From an evolutionary perspective, it seems we'd be wise to be extra careful about the roles of plants in our diets (they may require special preparation and/or cooking, for instance, to be consumed safely); because they've evolved under selection pressures as immobile organisms, that is, without the ability to run away or fight back physically, plants protect themselves from herbivores and omnivores by producing, holding, and releasing toxins (such as tannins and lectins) throughout their bodies. Most animals, on the other hand, have evolved "fight-or-flight" capacities and thus, if we catch them successfully, seem safer to eat because their tissues probably contain fewer poisons than plant cells do."

Gedgaudas does go on to say that...

"Modern produce has been genetically modified to reduce the presence of harmful compounds to a significant extent. Most wild plants, on the other hand, require extremely careful selection and preparation."

So, while it is probably not a good idea to walk outside and begin foraging without the requisite identification and cooking/preparation skills, you are unlikely to find anything particularly poisonous (at least in the acute sense) in your local grocer's produce section.

However, I do think that the chronic consumption of any particular vegetable is possibly unwise (i.e. eating broccoli every day). Without even considering paleolithic availability of edible plants, neolithic cultivated varieties of vegetables were only available seasonally until the very recent development of refrigerated transportation and global supply chains. One might indulge in broccoli (if it even grew in ones geographical vicinity) only during a select few months of the year.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on July 27, 2011
at 10:07 PM

There was no purely vegetarian tribes. All humans ate some meat. But the proportion of vegetables to meat was lopsided in favor of starch. This is pretty much indisputable and I don't see how Nora gets away with her puerile argument.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on July 27, 2011
at 10:06 PM

Actually you can do a thought experiment and reach a diametrically opposite conclusion. Nora is really talking about the Ice Age survivors of human evolution. She's not talking about the vast majority of humans that subsited primarily on starchy vegetables for many many years prior to agriculture. These starchy veggies were: potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, yuca, winter squash, taro, batava, etc. You can include legumes here also. I used to believe the nonsense spewed by Nora until it became clear to me that human evolved eating primarily starch before agriculture.

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 26, 2011
at 03:35 AM

The calories don't really matter but I believe there are some possible gut irritants that are not normally a problem but eating a pile every night may add up a bit much in your body.

Can you try varying the veggies?

1
D226a3fd05d4962db607e352256d36d9

on July 26, 2011
at 08:17 PM

No, you can't have enough vegetables. This is one piece of nutritional advice that is actually still accurate. :) Remember to vary them though to ensure you're getting the widest range of nutrients. Rule of thumb: place meat serving (size of your palm) on your plate & fill the rest with veggies.

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on July 26, 2011
at 01:04 PM

I've always taken in about 50g per day of carbs, all veggies.

You should vary them, and if you are trying to loose weight, pick the ones with the lowest insulin response (low sugar). Add in a tuber every once in a while to surprise your system and keep at it!!

Listen to your body, eat what it wants!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on July 26, 2011
at 01:36 PM

My body wants cookies!

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 26, 2011
at 04:46 AM

I try to eat more veggies than meat each meal. Your broccoli sounds fine. For sure mix it up a bit.

0
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on August 11, 2011
at 04:40 AM

Calories don't matter ever. Forget calories. The idea is to eat in such a way that your body is able to stop wanting to store fat. If your insulin in low, your body will regulate its calorie intake on its own and you won't store fat.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on August 10, 2011
at 09:58 PM

No, as long as they are real veggies, not ones heavy in starch or those nasty grains but eat seasonal and you will have no problem.

0
16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

on July 26, 2011
at 09:03 PM

If you have any hint of thyroid issues you might consider keeping an eye on amount of cruciferous vegetables you're consuming as they are known goitrogens. Here's a link which gives some more clarity on the issue:What are goitrogens and where are they found?

0
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on July 26, 2011
at 05:12 AM

I personally would worry about having all those oxalates night after night. Maybe you should change it up with different veggies a few nights a week. A big ass salad, a big plate of squash and zuchinni browned in butter is delicious, you can broil some peppers in the oven. It's always good to vary your veggies so you don't get too much of any one toxin. That's my two cents, anyway.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 26, 2011
at 01:53 PM

I meant red peppers, but it's true, green do.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on July 26, 2011
at 11:43 AM

Actually, broccoli has little to no oxalates. Peppers on the other hand, are very high in oxalates. http://www.ohf.org/docs/OxalateContent092003.pdf Despite having a tendency to form kidney stones, I still eat foods that range from high to low oxalate content. Since I don't have any of those calcium-binding phytates in grains and beans, and make sure I get the right balance of minerals, I haven't had an issue with stones in almost 2 years.

0
6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on July 26, 2011
at 04:12 AM

When I was doing the PH miracle diet (it's a miracle I survived) they promoted a lot of veggies and green drink which was more veggies and grass in a drinkable format. I and drank so much of the greens my poop was green. I believe anything can be over done to the point it becomes a detriment versus a benefit, however somethings may be harder to over due than others. I would also recommend variety in veggies as they contain a lot of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Too much of one specific veggie and you may end up deficient in one particular vitamin and overdosed in another. Also broccoli is cruciferious veggie that can potentially block thyroid function.

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