6

votes

Paleo Foods for the economically disadvantaged?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 23, 2010 at 3:12 PM

The recession has left many people homeless or unemployed.

Unfortunately most food banks seem to offer mainly foods of dubious value.

What are some other ways to get paleo foods?

Harvesting wild plants? Gleaning? Dumpster diving?

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:32 PM

You think taking food out of refuse that could contain who knows what, is safer than a freshly killed, wild animal??

50ebeeef39261e51e84324530ab95956

(110)

on November 01, 2011
at 01:44 PM

I also think Dumpster diving is a very good idea. I'd love to find people who are doing that on paleo!

50ebeeef39261e51e84324530ab95956

(110)

on November 01, 2011
at 01:41 PM

There are a lot of guys who do crazy sh*t on youtube. This is a bad joke! Dumpster diving is much much safer.

50ebeeef39261e51e84324530ab95956

(110)

on November 01, 2011
at 01:38 PM

You're so considerate, sean! Amen to that.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on January 22, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Yes! I grew potatoes and sweet potatoes and stored them, great source of calories and starch for cheap.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on January 22, 2011
at 06:18 PM

Have patience and understanding people. English is either not the posters first language (How many languages do you speak?) or they are in an environment that does not produce skills in our language (such as born into extreme poverty). Thanks to Melissa for helping the poster.

95f407502f92a7bc460e8f83652341de

(288)

on October 22, 2010
at 04:45 PM

Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild by Steve Brill He has made his living and reputation off of teaching people to forage for food in NYC

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 24, 2010
at 04:06 AM

I'm just being politically correct :)

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 24, 2010
at 03:41 AM

The trick is, you learn the disposal routine and so you can insure the food is relatively safe. As for meat, the smell is a better indicator than the expiration date anyway. Same with veggies.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on September 24, 2010
at 03:01 AM

=) Yeah, I did. Just jabbing at ya.

C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on September 24, 2010
at 01:27 AM

>forgot to mention, just in case: because of the Hg. :)

C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on September 24, 2010
at 01:26 AM

I'm a tightly-budgeted Paleo and also go the canned fish route. But for someone who eats as much canned fish as I do, I think its important to avoid tuna and farmed salmon, and to try and vary the other fish with mackerel and haddock and trout and even mussels.

Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on September 23, 2010
at 09:11 PM

For me canned salmon & mackerel is even cheaper. $2.29 for 14 oz of wild alaskan salmon or $1.99 for 14 oz mackerel. I'm not destitute but eat these pretty regularly for some cheaper meals.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 23, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Hah! So true, but did you see the original of this?

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on September 23, 2010
at 08:09 PM

Trying to second the program Tim has called out.

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on September 23, 2010
at 08:08 PM

Not an answer but a call to action: I would like to encourage any of us that have the means should contribute more paleo friendly goods to their local food bank. We had a drive where I work and I observed that the items that people bring are not the most helpful. If we all make an attempt perhaps we can help.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 23, 2010
at 06:04 PM

It is speculated that there was some cannibalism going on in the Upper Paleolithic - you could always try that. (Oh My Gosh! Just Kidding!)

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on September 23, 2010
at 05:06 PM

@Stephen: dude you are so guilty of not putting periods at the end of most of your sentences in your posts! =) For example: http://paleohacks.com/questions/5877/are-you-extremely-judgemental-do-neolethal-eaters-hit-your-nerve

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:05 PM

Which leads me to ask:http://paleohacks.com/questions/10955/modern-wilderness-survival-guide

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:03 PM

Nicely edited Melissa. Thanks! :)

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:01 PM

Completely reformatted, thanks Melissa, my above comment is now oddly out of place

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 23, 2010
at 04:00 PM

This was flagged by several people as being impossible to read and/or irrelevant. I think it IS relevant and interesting, so I translated it to modern English.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 23, 2010
at 03:59 PM

I would like to add, that hurt me to read. If you'd like people to answer your questions, please take the time to use grammar and spelling.

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15 Answers

4
0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

on September 23, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Locally, we have a "hunters against hunger" program that gets hunters to clean out their deep freezes twice a year and donate the meat to food pantries, homeless kitchens, etc. It keeps game meat and fowl available in the various shelters/kitchens here. Now wether or not that food kitchen breads and fries that meat in soy bean oil is another story....

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on September 23, 2010
at 08:09 PM

Trying to second the program Tim has called out.

3f61ba25dff05b513c7769a22408169a

on September 23, 2010
at 08:08 PM

Not an answer but a call to action: I would like to encourage any of us that have the means should contribute more paleo friendly goods to their local food bank. We had a drive where I work and I observed that the items that people bring are not the most helpful. If we all make an attempt perhaps we can help.

4
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:10 PM

If I were homeless, I would not forage or dumpster dive as a first option, because it would be important for me not to accidentally get sick. Instead, I would fully take advantage of local foodbanks. The Greater Boston Food Bank, for example, has fairly nutritious menu options. There is less processed food on their shelves than in an average person's kitchen.

Sometimes, getting calories is more important than getting strict paleo foods, if you are very low on money. More tubers could help, as could cheeses, coconut milks, etc. For protein, stew beef is cheap.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 24, 2010
at 03:41 AM

The trick is, you learn the disposal routine and so you can insure the food is relatively safe. As for meat, the smell is a better indicator than the expiration date anyway. Same with veggies.

3
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on January 22, 2011
at 07:10 PM

Two words: chuck roasts.

My local Kroger (big supermarket chain) had them on sale for $3.49/lb. Oh and it was buy one get one, so cut that price in half.

Meanwhile, filet mignon and ribeye prices were ridiculous. These big stores set low advertised prices on certain meat items to get people in the store. Abuse them by walking in and spending the $50 you just got at the plasma center on buy one get one chuck roast and you've just walked away with 20 king-sized meals...that's over 30 pounds of meat). AND you're eligible to donate plasma again, in only two days' time. This leaves you with enough for gas, garlic, Trader Joe's wine, and canned sardines for the lean times ahead.

3
3c7ae2aec385cb1e2cdbf18fed30c0fe

on September 24, 2010
at 12:39 AM

economically disadvantaged = poor.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 24, 2010
at 04:06 AM

I'm just being politically correct :)

3
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:18 PM

Canned tuna in just water or oil. Pretty inexpensive and 5 oz of meat each can. And it's already cooked!

C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on September 24, 2010
at 01:27 AM

>forgot to mention, just in case: because of the Hg. :)

C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on September 24, 2010
at 01:26 AM

I'm a tightly-budgeted Paleo and also go the canned fish route. But for someone who eats as much canned fish as I do, I think its important to avoid tuna and farmed salmon, and to try and vary the other fish with mackerel and haddock and trout and even mussels.

Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on September 23, 2010
at 09:11 PM

For me canned salmon & mackerel is even cheaper. $2.29 for 14 oz of wild alaskan salmon or $1.99 for 14 oz mackerel. I'm not destitute but eat these pretty regularly for some cheaper meals.

3
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:02 PM

Dumpster diving is a great option!!

I know people here in SoCal who hold down perfectly normal jobs and have enough money to buy groceries but who get 85% of their food from dumpsters! They've been working with local agencies to get some of this salvaged food to homeless shelters.

There's a shortish sort of documentary called Dive! that explains it all and explains how and why they don't get sick.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 23, 2010
at 06:04 PM

It is speculated that there was some cannibalism going on in the Upper Paleolithic - you could always try that. (Oh My Gosh! Just Kidding!)

50ebeeef39261e51e84324530ab95956

(110)

on November 01, 2011
at 01:44 PM

I also think Dumpster diving is a very good idea. I'd love to find people who are doing that on paleo!

2
2434d0588509cd2d362cc5edc416f757

on October 22, 2010
at 02:22 AM

Gardens can be a relatively inexpensive way to get some vegetables. Even though the weather is cooling down there are some vegetables that thrive in cooler climates, like lettuces, spinach, and brussels sprouts. Also, most communities have classes to teach you how to forage wild plants safely.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on January 22, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Yes! I grew potatoes and sweet potatoes and stored them, great source of calories and starch for cheap.

2
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on September 26, 2010
at 01:10 AM

Sometimes you just have to survive the lean times. I had couple years living on bread and mustard with occasional additions of cheap bologna or ramen soup. When you are really poor you do what you can, but some things are just impossible to achieve.

If I were really poor at the moment I would focus on getting a few elements as healthy as possible - tuna, eggs, chicken, ground meat and stretch it as possible with whatever is available. the rest - fillers with whatever they have in food banks that's least unhealthy. I would stay away from grain and sugar, but try to get other foods.

There are soup kitchens that may have some dishes really nutritious or at least not too unhealthy.

I can't come up with anything else that would be practically useful and didn't sound paternalist or insensitive.

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 24, 2010
at 03:44 AM

I trade other items for meat from a friend of mine who is a hunter. I give him burl wood for his wood projects, which I gather in the hills on my hikes. He gives me frozen slabs of wild game meat. My advice, see if you can trade favors or items for food. Or just ask for food. Many people have some canned food they don't really fancy that much that is just sitting on the shelf. There are also food shelters that will provide meals and food. Not all of it will be paleo but some of it will be decent.

2
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:31 PM

Roadkill! There's a guy on Youtube who lives off animals recently killed on the road. Sounds grim, but a good source of meat. He eats lots of badger, even odd things like owls. I believe he also freezes them.

50ebeeef39261e51e84324530ab95956

(110)

on November 01, 2011
at 01:41 PM

There are a lot of guys who do crazy sh*t on youtube. This is a bad joke! Dumpster diving is much much safer.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:32 PM

You think taking food out of refuse that could contain who knows what, is safer than a freshly killed, wild animal??

1
Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

on January 22, 2011
at 06:59 PM

Potatoes (without skin) and sweet potatoes are quite inexpensive and much better carb sources than grains. If you combine it with some inexpensive but nutritious meat cuts (bones could even be free in some areas) you would have a basic grain and legume free diet. You would still need some fish meat to complement, perhaps from canned fish.

1
Medium avatar

on January 22, 2011
at 06:05 PM

this sounds really weird, but you can ask your friends to save their bones for you. Just tell them to stick them in a zip lock in their freezer. When the zip lock is full, you take the bones off their hands. Making stock out of bones is a great way to get nutrients without having to buy meat.

My favorite book on foraging is this one: "The Forager's Harvest" by Samuel Thayer http://www.amazon.com/Foragers-Harvest-Identifying-Harvesting-Preparing/dp/0976626608/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1295718333&sr=8-1 It is organized by season. So flip to the current season to see whats out there and what it looks like in the season you are currently in. He tells you where to find it, what it looks like, other things it looks similar to that are dangerous, and how to prepare it. He also tells you whether it is flavorful or just useful for survival. This book is great and I've used it some to forage.

If you don't have money to buy it, try swap.com you can list books/cds/dvds/games you don't want anymore and swap with someone who has what you want and you have what they want. All you have to pay is to ship your item to them.

Also look into getting into wild mushroom foraging if you are in an area that supports it. I have a friend from Oregon who collected morel mushrooms and sold them and made good money doing it. You might be able to swap mushrooms with a nice restaurant in exchange for bones or meat.

Also, I've found that supermarkets that cater to certain cuisines have those food staples for cheaper prices. Whole foods doesn't have any coconut oil for less than $8 a jar. The local Indian grocery store has it for $3.00.

Oh, and also look for weird cuts of meat at the grocery store. I saw a beef tongue that weighed over 2 pounds and only cost $3.00. That's lots of meat for the money.

I totally agree with dumpster diving too.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on September 23, 2010
at 03:58 PM

Get into the wilderness and hunt/forage...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 23, 2010
at 04:05 PM

Which leads me to ask:http://paleohacks.com/questions/10955/modern-wilderness-survival-guide

95f407502f92a7bc460e8f83652341de

(288)

on October 22, 2010
at 04:45 PM

Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild by Steve Brill He has made his living and reputation off of teaching people to forage for food in NYC

0
5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on October 31, 2011
at 10:08 PM

Offal is stupidly cheap. Heart meat even has a very similar taste/consistency to normal muscle meat.

0
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on October 31, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Many farmers markets accept food stamps. Even if you don't have food stamps, this may be a way to get good fresh vegetables and lean grassfed meats. As you shop, strike up a conversation with the farmer (they love talking about their farms!). As you develop a relationship with the farmer, possibly over several visits, you can find out what they do with the bones, organ meats etc. after slaughter or what they do with "ugly" produce -- the stuff with blemishes, slightly wilted etc. They may be willing to sell it to you at a greatly reduced price, especially if you discuss your financial situation with them. Also, if you've been buying food with food stamps from them, they will know that you are really in financial need. I have a farmer who saves her "ugly" apples for me, and a friend who works on a farm who salvages food from the "scrap pile" for her family and her friends' families--stuff that probably wouldn't sell in a grocery store but is still nutritious.

The WIC program has also greatly expanded its nutritional choices and offers fresh vegetables and canned meats now. If you are a pregnant or nursing woman or have children 5 years old and younger, you could get a lot of generally healthy foods--some Paleo and some not too bad nutritionally, like brown rice and peanut butter.

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