2

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Paleo and traditional world cuisines

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 06, 2012 at 7:07 AM

Out of all the culinary traditions from any given country or region, do any in particular stand out as more paleo-compliant than others? That is, featuring more meat and green vegetables than grains as part of its usual recipes?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 06:21 PM

Nothing like grilled beef from the parilla, served criolla style with some fried plaintains and dirty looking rice. Colombian potato stew (ajiaco) is close to paleo as well.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 06:18 PM

Cheating slightly less on dim sum, my favorite is steamed sticky rice/meat rolled in a lotus leaf (lo mai gai). And there's always the BBQ pork slices by themselves.

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 06, 2012
at 05:48 PM

My husband is Korean, and I will say that Asians find a great way to hide sugar, soy, wheat and MSG in EVERYTHING. I tend to avoid Asian food on a non-cheat basis. Cheating though, I will kill a round of dim sum because there is no substitute for that dumpling-y goodness.

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 06, 2012
at 05:45 PM

That's even better!

0d7be15fd1a76c7a713b0e2e75381e75

(307)

on November 06, 2012
at 03:44 PM

http://www.amazon.com/Ohsawa-Organic-Shoyu-Unpasteurized-Sauce/dp/B001A4DWUA

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 03:24 PM

The Swiss made sandwiches using cheese slices for bread.

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6 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 01:17 PM

Nomadic and seminomadic Amerind cultures had no grains and relied on meat and seafood for most of the year, either fresh or dried. Non meat foods included berries and roots such as camas and wapato.

2
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 06, 2012
at 02:05 PM

I always always always do well at Latin American restaurants. Obviously the Brazilian steakhouse but also Colombian, Chilean and even Puerto Rican or Cuban food is excellent for Paleo. Lots of focus on meats and root veggies. So you'll get your starch from plantains and yucca. I mean c'mon, the Cubans and Puerto Ricans make a sandwich with plantains instead of bread...HELLO!

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 06, 2012
at 05:45 PM

That's even better!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 03:24 PM

The Swiss made sandwiches using cheese slices for bread.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 06, 2012
at 10:35 AM

I think the less cultures were into gardening and more into hunting/herding and gathering, the more paleo-compliant they were.

I have just finished reading two books on traditional cultures - the info is VERY inconsistent, incomplete and sketchy. No recipes, no accurate descriptions, no in-depth analysis. And those people call themselves anthropologists? I was greatly disappointed.

0
8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on November 06, 2012
at 10:41 PM

I think traditional asian cultures. I don't think japanese, chinese, actually use that much soy sauce, or it's truly fermented there, not like what you would use here.

My two cents:

traditional french: lots of organ meat - kidneys, sweet breads, brain. aspic - lots of collagen. charcuterie - liver, aspic, saucisson (fat pork sausage, so yum)

they never drink milk straight up - usually lots of yogurt, or cheese.

many many fresh vegetables. and yes, cream and butter, but also duck fat, tallow, lard. traditional cooking fats. and natural presence of extra virgin olive oil and alcoholic beverages (it's against the law to water the grapes - only what the weather provides!)

they eat seasonally (or used to), and the areas near the coast indulge in great seafood, use local herbs/flavors (say, lavender in provence, local honey)

french people eat a tiny amount of flour, believe it or not. like, a miniscule amount of bread. i actually wonder if it could be good because it's hormesis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hormesis

and plus the way they prepare grains is A LOT of fermentation time.

But of course, it's changing now. they are using more corn oil, canola oil, etc. we will see.

but a traditional restaurant, will Almost always have meat and fresh vegetables.

Vietnamese/other pacific islander (say hawaii): every part of the animal is used - broth, blood, lots of green vegetables, sweet potatoes, bananas. hawaii uses taro for poi (sometimes fermented), pork, etc. no grains. tons of bone broth!

both have lots of coconut that naturally grows there, lots of tropical fruits.

and more paleo - they take naps! in vietnam you get 2 hours for lunch so everyone can nap.

a traditional vietnamese meal has:

greens rice a soup a meat dish + something fermented (fish sauce, vegetable pickles, etc.)

i also think korean and japanese meals are structured this way too. traditional cuisine which are of course changing.

so it depends.

0
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on November 06, 2012
at 05:12 PM

I always have an easy time with Ethiopian and Columbian food.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 06:21 PM

Nothing like grilled beef from the parilla, served criolla style with some fried plaintains and dirty looking rice. Colombian potato stew (ajiaco) is close to paleo as well.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 06, 2012
at 03:10 PM

I find that chinese and japanese cuisine (without the rice) is very paleo friendly IF THEY WOULD JUST NOT USE SOY SAUCE...Ugghhh...I cheat sometimes and go to Panda Express and get their steak and asparagus stir-fry with a side of veggies. But of course it has a bunch of soy sauce and who knows what else. But you could make your own mock soy sauce (recipes online) at home and cook up a ton of asian style recipes that are delicious.

0d7be15fd1a76c7a713b0e2e75381e75

(307)

on November 06, 2012
at 03:44 PM

http://www.amazon.com/Ohsawa-Organic-Shoyu-Unpasteurized-Sauce/dp/B001A4DWUA

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 06, 2012
at 05:48 PM

My husband is Korean, and I will say that Asians find a great way to hide sugar, soy, wheat and MSG in EVERYTHING. I tend to avoid Asian food on a non-cheat basis. Cheating though, I will kill a round of dim sum because there is no substitute for that dumpling-y goodness.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 06, 2012
at 06:18 PM

Cheating slightly less on dim sum, my favorite is steamed sticky rice/meat rolled in a lotus leaf (lo mai gai). And there's always the BBQ pork slices by themselves.

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