2

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Interesting Additions to Bone Broths

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 06, 2012 at 11:05 PM

I like mine straight up with just sea salt and pepper -- but I also LOVE it with surprising/nuanced/subtle additions. One of my favorites is to add whole star anise to chicken broth.

How about you?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 08, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Melts in your mouth :) Thanks for asking - it is super easy.

992862b1b9e443f83aa4e46d14833418

(264)

on May 08, 2012
at 12:58 PM

That looks interesting. How would you describe the flavor? Is it chewy or does it melt in your mouth?

992862b1b9e443f83aa4e46d14833418

(264)

on May 08, 2012
at 12:52 PM

Whole spice. Aside from the taste, it's also really pretty. I wouldn't say it's easy to locate but Whole Foods *should* have it. If not, see if they can order it for you. If you get it in bulk it keeps for a long time in a sealed bag away from heat or light.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 08, 2012
at 05:41 AM

I like adding seaweed too, and sometimes I'll make miso soup using chicken broth.

D2db41500a9385fafe0f50e178717e80

(193)

on May 08, 2012
at 04:05 AM

Forgive my ignorance: star anise as the whole spice or ground? Also, is it a relatively easy to locate spice (Whole Foods, natural food stores) or does it take a little hunting?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:52 PM

-- but if you want a subtle citrus flavor, you could always zest the lemon/lime/orange and that might be good?!

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:51 PM

The pith (white part) of citrus peels are bitter and the taste tends to linger- I personally wouldn't want them in my stock. Not sure it would add any significant nutritional value either.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 07, 2012
at 04:38 AM

I try making plain broth, but I always keep saying "just one more ingredient and it'll be perfect" and before you know, I've emptied my entire fridge into a crock pot.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:14 AM

Star anise is AWESOME in chicken broth! Sometimes I add coconut milk and lemon for a Thai taste (after its cooked, when I'm making my morning mug).

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:01 AM

Yes, it is one kind of seaweed. At the Asian markets there are generally quite a few types...just watch ingredients. Sometimes they sneak stupid stuff in there.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 06, 2012
at 11:56 PM

Oh! That sounds good. Is wakame the dried seaweed?

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9 Answers

3
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on May 06, 2012
at 11:36 PM

I add all kinds of veggies (especially ones that NEED to be used) but I almost always add a bay leaf. Also, once done if you add some seaweed, I use wakame, and a bit of coconut aminos it is reminiscent of a lovely miso soup.u

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:01 AM

Yes, it is one kind of seaweed. At the Asian markets there are generally quite a few types...just watch ingredients. Sometimes they sneak stupid stuff in there.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 06, 2012
at 11:56 PM

Oh! That sounds good. Is wakame the dried seaweed?

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 08, 2012
at 05:41 AM

I like adding seaweed too, and sometimes I'll make miso soup using chicken broth.

3
16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

on May 06, 2012
at 11:09 PM

I often turn mine into pho.

This is a good one to start with: http://www.latestinpaleo.com/blog/2011/3/22/latest-in-paleo-pho-recipe-vietnamese-beef-soup.html

1
9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on May 07, 2012
at 12:19 AM

Stock is an excellent way to not waste anything for me. I throw in everything from the past week or two that's left over: onion and garlic scraps and peels, apples/sweet peppers/broccoli/carrots/hot peppers/spinach/etc. that are left over or about to go bad, egg shells, and generous amounts of thyme, oregano and rosemary. I keep a container in my freezer where I collect all of the above.

Throw in the veggies only in the last 10 mins or so of the simmering. My vegetarian co-worker says that way you don't kill the vitamins in them.

Just occurred to me: has anyone tried lemon/lime/orange peels in stock?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:52 PM

-- but if you want a subtle citrus flavor, you could always zest the lemon/lime/orange and that might be good?!

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:51 PM

The pith (white part) of citrus peels are bitter and the taste tends to linger- I personally wouldn't want them in my stock. Not sure it would add any significant nutritional value either.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 06, 2012
at 11:48 PM

I like to make hot and sour soup (sort of) with shiitakes, scallions, ginger, hot chilies, garlic, something sour (usually rice vinegar), a little thinly sliced meat, and some eggs.

Tom yum soup is also a favorite here. I do something similar to this, save without sugar: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/hot-and-sour-thai-soup-tom-yum-goong-recipe/index.html

Or pho (like invisible ink said). Of course now I have a wicked craving for pho.

Egg drop soup is also nice (and pretty inexpensive).

I actually eat these things for breakfast quite a bit, and when I'm not feeling well.

0
089881b3dc26f1d4ce66043302169701

on May 07, 2012
at 10:28 AM

I just had a giant mug of Japanese inspired soup... I premake the broth and let it gel, it keeps for a long time in the fridge that way. When I want soup, I spoon some out into a pot with water, add salt/spices, and warm it but don't boil.

I like to add in seaweed, and I might try seeing if I can source some nice, clean, traditionally made miso and tofu, and turn it into miso soup. I know some people avoid soy on paleo, but I think that if it's good and clean, organic, not GMO, it's fine every now and again. Plus, miso is fermented and super tasty :-)

0
E12ead3bf63c94b5b619b03722ef554f

on May 07, 2012
at 08:26 AM

I love egg drop soup! :)

0
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 07, 2012
at 06:32 AM

Here is a Korean recipe for bone broth soup, easy but delicious:

http://muffintop.wordpress.com/2006/12/20/sullung-tang-korean-beef-knucklebone-soup/

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 08, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Melts in your mouth :) Thanks for asking - it is super easy.

992862b1b9e443f83aa4e46d14833418

(264)

on May 08, 2012
at 12:58 PM

That looks interesting. How would you describe the flavor? Is it chewy or does it melt in your mouth?

0
7e13e284a1bafd7b4de14a50ee96140c

on May 07, 2012
at 05:07 AM

I like eating it plain with a generous tablespoon of coocnut oil and 2 egg yolks per serving.

a tip for those who can't stomach bone broth: try it with yogurt..soo good

0
4bd765bafe9640f90b40b2d3ca9a25a6

on May 07, 2012
at 04:30 AM

I like plain broth with sea salt and a tablespoon of coconut oil.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 07, 2012
at 04:38 AM

I try making plain broth, but I always keep saying "just one more ingredient and it'll be perfect" and before you know, I've emptied my entire fridge into a crock pot.

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