2

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How to eat paleo chinese food?

Answered on December 11, 2014
Created February 05, 2013 at 6:38 PM

I'm pretty happy with my nutritional ketosis diet now, it's high in fat, moderate protein, and low in carbs... and I've pretty much weaned myself from all processed foods, sugar, high fructose corn syrup, wheat products etc...

I don't really crave any of those things....

But what I do crave is Chinese food. Pork buns, beef noodle soup, dumplings, minced pork and rice, scallion pancake, shaved ice, boba milk tea, suncake, pineapple cake, dim sum, are just a few things...

and I when looking at the macro content of these things I know that it's just horrible, and the way they're made now uses lots of processed foods and wheat products.. but I can't shake the craving for them.

Any way to be paleo and still eat these things... or are they all relegated to the cheat meal/cheat day category..

Thanks!

Bbefed11fa0321228c32c189dfdac3c9

on July 18, 2014
at 05:06 PM

Update: This was really good! Process together 1 plantain (green to yellow), 2 eggs, pinch Real Salt, 1 T. sesame oil, 1 T. red palm oil (or exp. pressed coconut oil). Put in oiled and parchment-lined cast iron skillet (9 in.?) Cover with chopped scallions and push them in a bit. Bake at 350 until browned on the edges, 15 to 20 minutes probably.

Bbefed11fa0321228c32c189dfdac3c9

on July 18, 2014
at 04:02 PM

I worked at a very popular, rather posh Chinese restaurant in the 80's. When someone asked for steamed veggies, the cooks would put the veggies in a strainer and put the strainer with the veggies into the boiling vat of chicken stock to cook. I don't think that was what the macrobiotic folks who were ordering had in mind! I have no doubt that chicken was the cheapest factory-farmed chicken available, which isn't very paleo. :-(

0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on August 12, 2013
at 02:38 AM

Good question. Since going paleo, I've been looking into the possibility of joining my friends when they eat Chinese food (my options were always limited as a vegan). Isn't there a type of ground beef and lettuce dish? Meat sung?

B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

(694)

on February 08, 2013
at 09:56 PM

Excellent idea!

B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

(694)

on February 08, 2013
at 09:56 PM

I starting to think you're right... no more buns for me then.... I wonder if they can be made out of coconut flour. But one of the benefits of chinese food is the convenience... and making my own buns and then the inside stuffs may require more effort than I'm accustomed to.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:11 PM

Indeed. I tried to have some Chinese from my local take-away and specifically asked for a dish that has no flour or soy in it. I tried 2-3 times now in the 1.5 years I do Paleo, and every time it ends with me running to the toilet (I'm gluten intolerant). Interestingly, this does NOT happen on Japanese sushi places with plain rice and fish (I use my own soy sauce there, from home).

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17 Answers

best answer

2
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on February 05, 2013
at 07:54 PM

mmmmm msg. They put flour and sugar in sauces and soups without telling you, too. And soy, soy everywhere. I wouldn't even try, honestly.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:11 PM

Indeed. I tried to have some Chinese from my local take-away and specifically asked for a dish that has no flour or soy in it. I tried 2-3 times now in the 1.5 years I do Paleo, and every time it ends with me running to the toilet (I'm gluten intolerant). Interestingly, this does NOT happen on Japanese sushi places with plain rice and fish (I use my own soy sauce there, from home).

best answer

3
217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

on February 06, 2013
at 02:01 PM

I make lots of different types of food, including Chinese food. I recommend going to an Asian market and getting lots and lots of authentic spices. Meat or Seafood stir fry with cashews, carrots, water chestnuts, snow peas (I know some paleo people don't eat peas), red and yellow peppers, homemade chili sauce. WAY better than takeout.

4
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 05, 2013
at 08:27 PM

Make your own and use chopsticks :)

2
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 12, 2013
at 03:01 AM

IMHO, Chinese food -> high temperature fat cooking. Wok sizzling. And in my opinion in a paleo framework you can be quite liberal with fat, but it can not be fat heated past the smoke point. It is just toxic, no matter the type of fat that was heated to that point. In paleo you get your fats from soups (212F fat), from raw butter or olive oil or raw milk or chocolate, from roast drippings in root vegetables, or in gently sauteed meats and vegetables, but you should think of avoiding fat that has been changed at the molecular level (for margarine the same argument applies). Even bacon should be cooked slowly.

2
6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d

(726)

on February 05, 2013
at 07:41 PM

Beef noodle soup with arrowroot or yam noodles is good Chinese paleo.

B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

(694)

on February 08, 2013
at 09:56 PM

Excellent idea!

1
5d81827456aac9fdb88bdff39e9c109c

on August 12, 2013
at 01:41 AM

Roast duck, won ton soup - just the broth and veggies, roast pork, steamed mixed veggies, mushrooms with oyster sauce - sauce on the side, steamed asparagus with oyster sauce - sauce on the side. That's what I do at Chinese restaurants.

Bbefed11fa0321228c32c189dfdac3c9

on July 18, 2014
at 04:02 PM

I worked at a very popular, rather posh Chinese restaurant in the 80's. When someone asked for steamed veggies, the cooks would put the veggies in a strainer and put the strainer with the veggies into the boiling vat of chicken stock to cook. I don't think that was what the macrobiotic folks who were ordering had in mind! I have no doubt that chicken was the cheapest factory-farmed chicken available, which isn't very paleo. :-(

1
0322015c4939fe66483d9af05079ad87

on February 06, 2013
at 08:02 AM

I often stir fry meat with finely cut or shredded cabbage instead of noodles. I don't use store-bought sauces, I make mine from broth, arrowroot, chili, honey, ginger - just experiment. It is not exactly a chinese dish but I love it. And when I crave real Chinese, I go out and do a cheat day (once in a month or two).

1
A5127d60bca783084f191f38ffa357a6

on February 06, 2013
at 07:31 AM

Dude make this stuff I make, cook 1 inch chicken pieces in a pan then throw in cashews and mangos for a minute to heat up. Then add a little honey after and stir

1
61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

on February 05, 2013
at 08:23 PM

I personally don't worry about any fermented soy product, but you are going to have a hell of a time recreating that menu. Some people consider rice paleo, or at least acceptable, rice noodles(depending on the ingredients) would not be far off. Also roast pork and duck vs BBQ pork and duck are easy subs...

1
3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

on February 05, 2013
at 06:55 PM

The closest I think you're going to come is by creating Perfect Health Diet friendly dish.

B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

(694)

on February 08, 2013
at 09:56 PM

I starting to think you're right... no more buns for me then.... I wonder if they can be made out of coconut flour. But one of the benefits of chinese food is the convenience... and making my own buns and then the inside stuffs may require more effort than I'm accustomed to.

0
7c696cca56ed89ff43d21a79d750fe8d

on December 11, 2014
at 04:08 AM

Definitely cheat day goodies. 

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on July 28, 2014
at 05:25 PM

There are recipes out there to make some of your favorites Paleo, but you need to be aware of carbs if you want to remain in ketosis

Here are some common substitutions:

Soy sauce: fish sauce, sesame oil, and coconut aminos (I mix all 3, and use sparingly)

Rice: cauliflower "rice" or chopped shiritaki noodles

Noodles: shiritaki noodles or veggies sliced into ribbons (zucchini, carrot, cabbage)

Flour: nut or coconut flour--this will work for scallion pancakes, for example.

If you choose to use tofu, find the fermented kind, not the usual grocery store stuff.

Bready stuff like pork buns is probably not doable, but you can follow a recipe for the filling and forget the bun.

I've been experimenting with resistant starches while maintaining ketosis. Rice pasta, rice wrappers, and cooked and cooled rice are not knocking me out of ketosis. The starch in these items has gelled into RS. Ymmv, be sure to test yourself.

0
992085791de15fd69b64e5b91a3e1e92

on July 27, 2014
at 04:17 PM

lol, I totally feel you..

1, you can try substituting noodles with shirataki noodles. they test and feel more like vermicelli though.. but it's basically carb free fibre.

Keep the soups, like bittergourd, watercress, etc, since they're usually nice the said veggies with pork.

0
52ad7ee5eef0d7339d0977bd7a2ceb8a

on July 27, 2014
at 05:08 AM

personally, i would just make gluten free versions of the dishes that you are speaking of. it might not be paleo, nutrient dense or sugar and soy free, but its without the wheat (which is much worse than soy and sugar) and it's only once in a while. i'm sure there are tons of gluten free chinese recipes... all of that could definitely be recreated with gluten free flours, honey, etc. enjoy.

revision: sorry, just realized you said you were in ketosis. gluten free flours tend to be high glycemic. there are kelp noodles and shiratake noodles (BUT MADE OF SOY but just throwing it in there), and also the flour for the scallion pancake could be made of almond, coconut, and egg. i still stand by my first answer. comfort food is healthy... for the soul. :]

0
0f8f77156cd0667d43194fc4b8bc3b5d

on July 18, 2014
at 03:44 AM

I have a hard time trying to eat in Chinese restaurants. Maybe due to hidden gluten or soy-sauce? Or something else I can't figure out just makes me feel lousy afterward.

Not wanting to give up Chinese food meant I had to learn to make my own. Here is my own recipe for a paleo version of Chicken Fried Rice that always goes over well with paleo and non-paleo eaters alike.

0
Bbefed11fa0321228c32c189dfdac3c9

on July 16, 2014
at 09:28 PM

Plantain bread from Purely Twins, with addition of scallions and sesame oil might work to satisfy a craving for scallion pancake. It's sure going to be part of my dinner! For dipping sauce, I'd wing a sauce with coconut aminos.

Bbefed11fa0321228c32c189dfdac3c9

on July 18, 2014
at 05:06 PM

Update: This was really good! Process together 1 plantain (green to yellow), 2 eggs, pinch Real Salt, 1 T. sesame oil, 1 T. red palm oil (or exp. pressed coconut oil). Put in oiled and parchment-lined cast iron skillet (9 in.?) Cover with chopped scallions and push them in a bit. Bake at 350 until browned on the edges, 15 to 20 minutes probably.

0
229faa9f9cb551cbf9d1d766b84cf8f5

on August 12, 2013
at 04:26 AM

No, you cannot eat them. To do so would be to forfeit your new identity as a primitive human undoing all the god-like powers you have gained. I suggest you never step foot into a Chinese restaurant again, let alone follow your cravings, if you wish to survive past the age of 60.

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